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Submission + - LinkedIn-Based Intelligence Gathering Campaign Targets the Security Industry->

itwbennett writes: Researchers from F-Secure have found that an intelligence-gathering campaign has been using fake LinkedIn recruiter profiles to map out the professional networks of IT security experts. It's not clear what the end goal of the suspicious LinkedIn recruiting campaign is, and it could just be part of a research project, but as IDG News Service's Lucian Constantin points out, 'There are multiple cases where attackers have used fake LinkedIn profiles to gather sensitive information about organizations and their employees.'
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Submission + - Uber Ride Data Publicly Accessible Through Google->

itwbennett writes: On Thursday, ZDNet reported that Uber ride data had leaked into Google search results. And Zach Minors confirmed in an ITworld article that a 'site-specific Google search for trip.uber.com produced dozens of links to Uber rides that have been completed and cancelled, in countries around the world including the U.S., England, Russia, France and Mexico. Each link leads to a Web site with a map showing the ride's route, with the pickup and destination tagged with markers. A card on the page also shows the first name of the rider and driver, along the driver's photo, make and model of the car, and license plate number.' But, what was on the surface a privacy red flag was not a 'data leak,' according to an Uber spokeswoman: 'We have found that all these links have been deliberately shared publicly by riders. Protection of user data is critically important to us and we are always looking for ways to make it even more secure.'
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Submission + - Pioneer Looks To Laserdisc Tech for Low-Cost LIDAR->

itwbennett writes: Pioneer is developing a 3D LIDAR (light detection and ranging) sensor for use in autonomous vehicles that could be a fraction of the cost of current systems (the company envisions a price point under $83). Key to this is technology related to optical pickups once used in laserdisc players, which Pioneer made for 30 years.
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Submission + - Future Wearables Could Use Your Body As A Network->

jfruh writes: Many wearable computing devices communicate with each other via Bluetooth, but there's a problem with that: the human body actually absorbs much of the signal, meaning that wearables have to crank up the power (and burn through their battery). Researchers at UC San Diego are exploring a different option: using magnetic signals sent through the body itself rather than the air around it to communicate.
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Submission + - FTC: Machinima Took Secret Cash To Shil Xbox

jfruh writes: The Machinima gaming video network took money from a marketing agency hired by Microsoft to pay "influencers" up to $45,000 to promote the Xbox One. Crucially, the video endorsers did not disclose that they'd been paid, which has caused trouble with the FTC. For its part, Machinima notes that this happened in 2013, when the current management was not in charge.

Submission + - It's Still Windows 95's World. We Just Live In It.->

jfruh writes: I'm a Mac guy — have been ever since the '80s. When Windows 95 was released 20 years ago, I was among those who sneered that "Windows 95 is Macintosh 87." But now, as I type these words on a shiny new iMac, I can admit that my UI — and indeed the computing landscape in general — owes a lot to Windows 95, the most influential operating system that ever got no respect.
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Submission + - Tech Nightmares That Keep Turing Award Winners Up At Night->

itwbennett writes: At the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany this week, RSA encryption algorithm co-inventor Leonard Adelman, 'Father of the Internet' Vint Cerf, and cryptography innovator Manuel Blum were asked 'What about the tech world today keeps you up at night?' And apparently they're not getting a whole lot of sleep these days. Cerf is predicting a digital dark age arising from our dependence on software and our lack of 'a regime that will allow us to preserve both the content and the software needed to render it over a very long time.' Adelman worries about the evolution of computers into 'their own species' — and our relation to them. Blum's worries, by contrast, lean more towards the slow pace at which computers are taking over: '"The fact that we have brains hasn't made the world any safer,' he said. 'Will it be safer with computers? I don't know, but I tend to see it as hopeful.'
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Submission + - Amazon Reportedly Laid Off Dozens from Fire Smartphone Team->

itwbennett writes: In recent weeks, Amazon has laid off an unspecified number (but in the dozens) of engineers from its Lab126 hardware development center in Silicon Valley who worked on the Fire smartphone, according to a Wall Street Journal news report. The company has also reorganized Lab126, as well as scaled back and killed some other projects in the division.
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Submission + - What Not To Say To Your Non-IT Coworkers (And What To Say Instead)->

jfruh writes: Do your interactions with non-tech staff at your company end in tears and acrimony? It may be that the skills you've developed to good effect to communicate with your peers aren't applying across department boundries. We talked to various tech staff and communications pros for some tips and talking to normals.
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Submission + - Why Modular Smartphones Are Such a Nightmare To Develop->

itwbennett writes: Last week Google postponed tests of its Project Ara until next year. Mikael Ricknäs has written about why developing such devices is particularly difficult. The biggest challenge, writes Ricknäs, 'is the underlying architecture, the structural frame and data backbone of the device, which makes it possible for all the modules to communicate with each other. It has to be so efficient that the overall performance doesn't take a hit and still be cheap and frugal with power consumption.' For more on Project Ara and its challenges, watch this Slashdot interview with the project's firmware lead Marti Bolivar.
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Submission + - Court: FTC Can Punish Companies With Sloppy Cybersecurity->

jfruh writes: The Congressial act that created the Federal Trade Commission gave that agency broad powers to punish companies engaged in "unfair and deceptive practices." Today, a U.S. appeals court affirmed that sloppy cybersecurity falls under that umbrella. The case involves data breaches at Wyndham Worldwide, which stored customer payment card information in clear, readable text, and used easily guessed passwords to access its important systems.
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Submission + - Skylake Has a Voice DSP and Listens To Your Commands->

itwbennett writes: Intel's new Skylake processor (like the Core M processor released last year) comes with a built-in digital signal processor (DSP) that will allow you to turn on and control your PC with your voice. Although the feature is not new, what is new is the availability of a voice controlled app to use it: Enter Windows 10 and Cortana. If this sounds familiar, it should, writes Andy Patrizio: 'A few years back when the Xbox One was still in development, word came that Kinect, its motion and audio sensor controller, would be required to use the console and Kinect would always be listening for voice commands to start the console. This caused something of a freak-out among gamers, who feared Microsoft would be listening.'
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Submission + - Linus Torvalds: Security Will Never Be Perfect->

jfruh writes: Linus Torvalds was a surprise speaker at this year's LinuxCon, and in a typically provocative speech, he declared that chasing after perfect security will always fail. Instead, he touted the open source model, which he said led to bugs and security holes in production environments being fixed as quickly as possible.
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Submission + - SAP Paid Bribes To Panamanian Officials->

jfruh writes: A former SAP exec has pled guilty to bribing Panamanian officials in a successful attempt to sell SAP licenses to the Panamanian government. Vicente Eduardo Garcia, SAP’s former vice president of global and strategic accounts for Latin America, says that he wasn't the only SAP employee who knew about the scheme.
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"A complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that worked." -- John Gall, _Systemantics_

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