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Submission + - Who Makes The Decision To Go Cloud and Who Should?

Esther Schindler writes: It’s a predictable argument in any IT shop: Should the techies — with their hands on their keyboards — be the people who decide which technology or deployment is right for the company? Or should CIOs and senior management — with their strategic perspective — be the ones to make the call? Ellis Luk got input from plenty of people about management vs. techies making cloud/on-premise decisions... with, of course, a lot of varying in opinion.

Comment Re:REALLY? (Score 1) 698

Ha!

I started in mainframe days when SO MANY PROGRAMMERS I KNEW TYPED IN ALL CAPS BECAUSE THAT WAS THE ONLY THING THE COMPILER UNDERSTOOD.

And then those people tried to use email, and thought that it was perfectly fine to write all non-programming correspondence that way. Including my brother-in-law... and you can't tell your BiL he's an idiot. Not if you want your sister to keep talking to you.

Submission + - Why do we still have caps lock prominently on keyboards?

Esther Schindler writes: The developers at .io are into tracking things, I guess. In any case, a few weeks back they decided to track team performance in terms of keyboard and mouse activity during the working day. They installed a simple Chrome plugin on every macbook and collected some statistics. For instance, developers have fewer keypresses than editors and managers—around 4k every day. Managers type more than 23k characters per day. And so on. Some pretty neat statistics.

But the piece that jumped out at me was this:

What’s curious—the least popular keys are Capslock and Right Mouse Button. Somewhere around 0.1% of all keypresses together. It’s time to make some changes to keyboards.

I've been whining about this for years. Why is it that the least-used key on my keyboard not just in a prominent position, but also bigger than most other keys? I can I invest in a real alternate keyboard with a different layout (my husband's a big fan of the Kinesis keyboards, initially to cope with carpal tunnel). But surely it's time to re-visit the standard key layout?

Submission + - Paul Hudak, co-creator of Haskell, has died

Esther Schindler writes: Yale is reporting that Paul Hudak, professor of computer science and master of Saybrook College, died last night after a long battle with leukemia. He was known as one of the principle designers of Haskell, which you probably don't need to be told he defined as "a purely functional programming language."

Submission + - Good: Companies care about data privacy. Bad: No idea how to protect it. 1

Esther Schindler writes: Research performed by Dimensional Research demonstrated something most of us know: Just about every business cares about data privacy, and intends to do something to protect sensitive information. But when you cross-tabulate the results to look more closely at what organizations are actually doing to ensure that private data stays private, the results are sadly predictable: While smaller companies care about data privacy just as much as big ones do, they’re ill-equipped to respond. What’s different is not the perceived urgency of data privacy and other privacy/security matters. It’s what companies are prepared (and funded) to do about it.

For instance:

When it comes to training employees on data privacy, 82% of the largest organizations do tell the people who work for them the right way to handle personally identifiable data and other sensitive information. Similarly, 71% of the businesses with 1,000-5,000 employees offer such training.

However, even though smaller companies are equally concerned about the subject, that concern does not trickle down to the employees quite so effectively. Half of the midsize businesses offer no such training; just 39% of organizations with under 100 employees regularly train employees on data privacy.

Presumably, your employer cares about data security and privacy, too (if for no other reason than to keep its name out of the news). But what is it really doing to ensure that protection?

Businesses

We'll Be the Last PC Company Standing, Acer CEO Says 417

Velcroman1 writes: At a sky-high press conference atop the new World Trade Center in lower Manhattan, Acer unveiled a sky-high lineup of goods – and placed a flag in the sand for the sagging PC industry. "There are only four or five players in the PC industry, and all of us are survivors," Jason Chen, CEO of Acer Corp, told an international group of reporters. "We will be the last man standing for the PC industry." To that end, the company showed off a slew of new laptops and 2-in-1s, the new Liquid X2 smartphone, and introduces a new line of gaming PCs, called Predator. I suspect Apple will outlive Acer; who do you think will fall next (or rise next)?

Submission + - Modern Supercomputers Have Just Hit the End of Another Architectural Era->

An anonymous reader writes: There has been a steady climb toward accelerators for top-ranked machines, but with the self-hosted model of the upcoming Knights Landing architecture, this offload model and the bottleneck of data movement between the GPU and other elements, will likely go away. The OpenPower efforts of IBM and Nvidia to use NVlink to speed that communication will be put to the test with the Power9 based systems coming to other centers in the next couple of years, including the future 150-petaflop “Sierra” machine coming to Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, but Gara says that these are still using what amounts to an offload model in that data has to be pushed between multiple components.

It is not clear how the Top 500 folks will choose to classify systems that have a GPU that is part of the compute since the accelerators classification generally just refers to a coprocessor that sits across a bus. The main question, however, is how long it will take for this classification to disappear entirely. As it stands, the new top-tier systems that will start to come online, possibly for the November rankings, will sport Knights Landing, wherein the accelerator is not a discrete unit. Gara says the shift away from the offload model is already starting to happen, and will continue with the introduction of Knights Landing into the full HPC market (right now just the national labs—at least as far we know) are part of the early access program for these chips.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - NTP's Fate Hinges On 'Father Time'

Esther Schindler writes: In April, one of the open source code movement's first and biggest success stories, the Network Time Protocol, will reach a decision point, writes Charlie Babcock. At 30 years old, will NTP continue as the preeminent time synchronization system for Macs, Windows, and Linux computers and most servers on networks?

Or will this protocol go into a decline marked by drastically slowed development, fewer bug fixes, and greater security risks for the computers that use it? The question hinges to a surprising degree on the personal finances of a 59-year-old technologist in Talent, Ore., named Harlan Stenn.

Submission + - End of grocery store checkout lanes? Maybe.

Esther Schindler writes: NCR says it's developed a "whole store scanner" that will allow shoppers to buy items in a store with no need to checkout at a traditional checkout lane. The system was made public today for the first time in a U.S. patent application by NCR.

"With these approaches," NCR says,"it is possible to revolutionize the checkout process for retailers and consumers. To summarize, the process can be as simple as placing items in a cart, picking up an electronic or paper receipt, and leaving the store."

Here's how it works: "The system employs dozens of low-cost cameras to watch the customer, the customer's shopping cart or basket, and the view of visible items as the customer moves through a store.When a customer enters a store, a first camera takes his or her image that is then linked with the empty shopping cart he or she's selected, NCR says. The shopper then links a mobile phone or other payment mechanism with that image." ...and more, of course, but that does give us an idea of what they're envisioning.

Think they can pull it off?

Whom computers would destroy, they must first drive mad.

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