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+ - Was Microsoft Just Forced To Pay $136M In Back Taxes To China?->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "An report from Xinhua, China's state-run news agency, desscribes a hefty bill for unpaid back taxes paid by "M company," a tech firm described in terms that seem to only fit Microsoft's Chinese subsidiary. The company apparently used accounting trickery to hide profits, resulting in an investigation and a hefty back tax bill."
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+ - How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "For too long, it looked like SSD capacity would always lag well behind hard disk drives, which were pushing into the 6TB and 8TB territory while SSDs were primarily 256GB to 512GB. That seems to be ending. In September, Samsung announced a 3.2TB SSD drive. And during an investor webcast last week, Intel announced it will begin offering 3D NAND drives in the second half of next year as part of its joint flash venture with Micron. Meanwhile, hard drive technology has hit the wall in many ways. They can't really spin the drives faster than 7,200 RPM without increasing heat and the rate of failure. All hard drives have now is the capacity argument; speed is all gone. Oh, and price. We'll have to wait and see on that."
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+ - Is Ruby on Rails Losing Steam?->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "In a post last week, Quartz ranked the most valuable programming skills, based on job listing data from Burning Glass and the Brookings Institution. Ruby on Rails came out on top, with an average salary of $109,460. And that may have been true in the first quarter of 2013 when the data was collected, but 'before you run out and buy Ruby on Rails for Dummies, you might want to consider some other data which indicate that Rails (and Ruby) usage is not trending upwards,' writes ITworld's Phil Johnson. Johnson looked at recent trends in the usage of Ruby (as a proxy for Rails usage) across MS Gooroo, the TIOBE index, the PYPL index, Redmonk's language rankings, and GitHut and found that 'demand by U.S. employers for engineers with Rails skills has been on the decline, at least for the last year.'"
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+ - Slack Now Letting Employers Tap Workers' Private Chats-> 1

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Chat app maker Slack is hoping to make inroads in the enterprise with a new paid plan that will include an optional feature called Compliance Exports that will let administrators access their team's communications, encompassing public and private messages. The tool is far-reaching, potentially including the edit history for workers' messages as well as messages workers have marked for deletion, if the supervisor so desires."
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+ - EU Lawmakers: Breaking Up Google Just One Possible Antritrust Option->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "A draft version of a European Parliament resolution, reported by news outlets over the weekend, calls on the Commission to break up Google as one way to solve competition issues with the search engine provider, which is the biggest in Europe. But there are other options as well. "We want fair and neutral search in the interest of consumers. Unbundling is one of the ideas but we proposed several ideas of solutions that are on the table," said German Parliament member Andreas Schwab and Ramon Tremosa of Spain, who drafted the resolution. One of the other solutions is a rotation mechanism, which would display commercial services from Google and its competitors in the same location and with the same prominence on the search results page. And another option for resolving Google's antitrust issues is to adopt legal measures that would specifically prevent anticompetitive behavior in search, Tremosa and Schwab said."
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+ - Intel Is Hitting The Wall On Moore's Law->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Fifty years ago, Gordon Moore observed that the number of transistors engineers were managing to squeeze onto a chip was doubling every two years. Four years later, Moore co-founded Intel, a company that elevated this observation into a law and put it at the heart of its business. But now, with chip engineering reaching the point where components are measured in terms of individual molecules, Moore's Law may have reached it's limits — with dire results for Intel."
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+ - Molecular Clusters That Can Retain Charge Could Revolutionize Computer Memory->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Computing devices have been gobbling up more and more memory, but storage tech has been hitting its limits, creating a bottleneck. Now researchers in Spain and Scotland have reported a breakthrough in working with metal-oxide clusters that can retain their charge. These molecules could serve as the basis for RAM and flash memory that will be leagues smaller than existing components."
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+ - Synergy! Bezos-Owned Washington Post App Now Free On Kindle Fire->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "When Jeff Bezos bought the Washington Post, people wondered how the tech heavyweight would approach the business of running a traditional print outlet, and how Amazon would fit into the picture. Well, here's a first tiny step: Kindle Fire owners will now be getting a free six month subscription to the Post's slick new Web app, whether they ask for it or not."
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+ - Number Of Coders In Congress To Triple (From One To Three)->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Last weekend, Tim Berners-Lee said that the UK needs more members of parliament who can code. Well, the most recent U.S. congressional election has obliged him on this side of the Atlantic: the number of coders in Congress has tripled, with the downside being that their numbers have gone from one to three."
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+ - Nokia's N1 Android tablet is actually a Foxconn tablet-> 1

Submitted by sfcrazy
sfcrazy (1542989) writes "Nokia surprised everyone when it announced the N1 Android tablet during the Slush conference in Finland, today. There is a twist in the story though: This is not a Nokia device.

Nokia doesn’t have a device unit anymore: it sold its Devices and Services business to Microsof, in 2013. N1 is made by Chinese contract manufacturing company Foxconn, which also manufactures the iPhone and the iPad.

But Nokia’s relationship with Foxconn is different from Apple’s. You buy iDevices from Apple, not Foxconn; you call Apple for support, not Foxconn. You never deal with Foxconn.

In the case of N1, Nokia will be nowhere in the picture. Foxconn will be handling the sales, distribution and customer care for the device. Nokia is licensing the brand, the industrial design, Z Launcher software layer and IP on a running royalty basis to Foxconn."

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+ - Facebook's Flow Could Help JavaScript Programmers Spot Elusive Bugs->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Facebook has released as open source a debugging tool for JavaScript, called Flow. Flow is a static type checker, one that ensures that when a program is run that its variables, functions and other elements of code will adhere to their original specifications. 'Flow improves speed and efficiency so developers can be more productive while using JavaScript,' Facebook engineers said in a blog post on Tuesday."
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+ - Latest Construction Tools: 3D Glasses, Drones->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "There's a lot more to building a new hospital than just unrolling a blueprint these days. This video shows some of the tools used to help people better navigate the complex infrastructure that underlies a high-tech building: designs that can be viewed with 3D glasses, and tiny drones that can fly into the worksite to check on hard-to-reach spaces."
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+ - Facebook Wants To Be Your Cloud Office Suite->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Facebook, not satisfied with being the site you sneak peeks with at the office when you should be doing real work, now wants to be someplace where you actually do that real work, with work collaboration and document editing features supposedly in the works. Of course, Facebook also says that "For users who are truly concerned with sharing their information with a particular platform, honestly, you might not want to share information with that platform.""
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+ - Superbugs: 10 Long-Lived Software Bugs->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Earlier this week, Microsoft patched a 19-year-old security vulnerability that has been present in every version of its operating systems since the release of Windows 1995. As the IBM researchers who discovered the bug put it, it’s been 'sitting in plain site' while other vulnerabilities in the same library have been fixed over the years. While it may seem surprising that a critical error in such a major piece of software, used by so many people, could go unnoticed for decades, it’s actually not that uncommon, writes ITworld's Phil Johnson, who rounded up 10 more examples of software bugs that were particularly long-lived — not all of which have yet been fixed."
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