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+ - Four Paths To A Rock-Star Tech Career->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Some people want to break out of just an ordinary nine-to-five life, and would rather turn their tech skills into a path to superstardom. While this sort of gambit is always a long shot, career expert Eric Bloom outlines some possible strategies: You can become a true expert in a psecific technology, make yourself an authority on a specific application area, hitch your start to an emerging tech field, or wade into the more nebulous world of being a "futurist.""
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+ - Simple.TV Lets You Share DVR'd Content With Friends: When's The Crackdown?->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Simple.TV is a DVR for over-the-air television programs with a lot of nifty functionality, and it just gained a new one: the ability to share recorded content with friends over the Internet. The question is, how long will media companies tolerate the ability to stream media to other people, even media that arrived for free over the publicly owned airwaves?"
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+ - Intel's Tiny Galileo Board Gets Custom Windows 8.1 Version->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Intel, trying to work its way into the hobbyist market revealed by enthusiasm around the tiny Raspberry Pi computer, has come up with its own credit-card-sized Arduino-certified gadget, the Galileo. Now Microsoft is getting in on the game by offering a customized version of Windows 8.1 that can run on the hardware."
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+ - Why Chinese Hackers Would Want US Hospital Patient Data->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "In a follow-up to yesterday's story about the Chinese hackers who stole hospital data of 4.5 million patients, IDG News Service's Martyn Williams set out to learn why the data, which didn't include credit card information was so valuable. The answer is depressingly simple: people without health insurance can potentially get treatment by using medical data of one of the hacking victims. John Halamka, chief information officer of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network, said a medical record can be worth between $50 and $250 to the right customer — many times more than the amount typically paid for a credit card number, or the cents paid for a user name and password. 'If I am one of the 50 million Americans who are uninsured ... and I need a million-dollar heart transplant, for $250 I can get a complete medical record including insurance company details,' he said."
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+ - Hackers Steal Data On 4.5 Million US Hospital Patients->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Community Health Systems said the attack occurred in April and June of this year, but it wasn't until July that it determined the theft had taken place. Working with a computer security company, it determined the attack was carried out by a group based in China that used 'highly sophisticated malware' to attack its systems. The hackers got away with patient names, addresses, birthdates, telephone numbers and Social Security numbers of the 4.5 million people who were referred to or received services from doctors affiliated with the company in the last five years. The stolen data did not include patient credit card, medical or clinical information."
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+ - Vehicle-To-Vehicle Networks Could Save Over 1,000 Lives a Year->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "On Monday, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) published a research report on vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology and is seeking input from the public and industry. In the report, it estimated the safety benefits of just two possible applications of V2V, called Left Turn Assist and Intersection Movement Assist. Together, they could prevent as many as 592,000 crashes and save 1,083 lives per year, the agency said."
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+ - Baidu Partners With U.N. To Tackle E-waste In China->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "A Web-based app called "Baidu Recycle Station" launched Monday as part a new joint lab established by Baidu and the United Nations Development Program that will use Baidu's Internet services and data analytics to develop programs targeted at helping the environment, health care, education and more. The app is meant to help streamline the recycling of e-waste in China by helping users easily sell their old electronics to legitimate recycling factories. And none too soon: The country is the second largest producer of electronic trash, creating over 3.6 million tons of it each year, according to a U.N. study."
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+ - Chinese National Indicted Over Boeing Hacks->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Su Bin, a Chinese citizen arrested in Canada, has been indicted over a series of hacks of Boeing's network in which documents pertaining the C-17 military aircraft and F-22 and F-35 fighter planes were stolen. Su allegedly communicated with hackers in China to direct the attacks using free Gmail accounts, excerpts from which were included in FBI affidavits on the case."
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+ - British Spy Agency Ran Port Scans On Entire Nations->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "As part of its so-called "Hacienda" program, the British spy agency GCHQ ran port scans for vulnerabilities across the networks of at least 27 entire countries, a German news site reveals. The site also reported that the Canadian spy agency CSEC has indentified a number of computers it could take over and use as operational relay boxes to launch attacks."
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+ - Groundwork Layed For Superfast Broadband Over Copper->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Telecom equipment vendor Adtran has developed a technology that will make it easier for operators to roll out broadband speeds close to 500Mbps over copper lines. Adtran's FDV (Frequency Division Vectoring), enhances the capabilities of two technologies — VDSL2 with vectoring and G.fast — by enabling them to better coexist over a single subscriber line, the company said. VDSL2 with vectoring, which improves speeds by reducing noise and can deliver up to 150Mbps, is currently being rolled out by operators, while G.fast, which is capable of 500Mbps, is still under development, with the first deployments coming in mid-2015. FDV will make it easier for operators to roll out G.fast once it's ready and expand where it can be used, according to Adtran."
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+ - Samsung Buys Kickstarter-Funded Internet Of Things Startup->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "In September of 2012, SmartThings took to Kickstarter with the promise of delivering an "Internet of things" package to backers, including a hub device that would control various home gadgets via the user's smartphone. They aimed to raise $250,000. They got $1.2 million. And now they've been bought by Samsung for a reported $200 million, as the South Korean electronics market tries to get a foothold into this emerging market."
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+ - I'll Have What She's Having: Top Technologies Startups Are Using->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Leo Polovets, a former LinkedIn and Google engineer turned VC, recently examined data from AngelList, an online community for startups, looking at the self-reported use of technologies by startups. Here's a sampling of what came out on top: JavaScript is by far the dominant programming language choice, followed by Ruby and Python. MongoDB is tops in databases, followed by MySQL. And AWS was the clear top choice for infrastructure and hosting."
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+ - Dozens Of US Tech Firms Violating Privacy Promises To EU Citizens->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "Since 2000, many U.S. companies have signed on to the voluntary EU Safe Harbor framework, agreeing to treat the personal data of European citizens with more care and privacy than they otherwise would. The problem, as one might expect from an entirely voluntary agreement that runs against a company's finacial interests, is that many of the companies are simply ignoring their own promises. Violators include Adobe, AOL, and Salesforce.com."
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+ - How Seven Forward-Thinking Countries Are Teach Kids To Code->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "In South Korea, programming becomes a required subject for middle schoolers starting this year. In the UK, all state school students will need to learn to write algorithms in two languages by age 11. These are just two countries that are making a dedicated effort to inculcate a coding culture into their children, but there are a more across the world."
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