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Submission Why Is RAM Suddenly So Cheap?->

jfruh writes: The average price of a 4GB DDR3 memory DIMM at the moment $18.50 — a price that silicon tech blogger Andy Patrizio calls "just crazy." Why is it so cheap? The memory business tends to go in boom and bust cycles, but the free availability of Windows 10 means that fewer people are upgrading their PCs, reducing RAM demand — and prices might stay low for another two years.
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Submission Nissan Creates The Ultimate Distracted Driving Machine->

jfruh writes: More and more research is suggesting that it isn't safe to text or even talk on our phones hands-free while driving, but one brave car company is pushing full-speed in the other direction. Nissan has created a concept car in which every surface, including the entire dashboard and even the seats, is a display device. The car is the result of "extensive" surveys with the younger generation that came to the conclusion that, according to Nissan, young people "feel that time spent in a car should be time for connecting and sharing experiences with friends."
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Submission 30 years a sysadmin->

itwbennett writes: Sandra Henry-Stocker’s love affair with Unix started in the early 1980s when she 'was quickly enamored of the command line and how much [she] could get done using pipes and commands like grep.’ Back then, she was working on a Zilog minicomputer, a system, she recalls, that was 'about this size of a dorm refrigerator’. Over the intervening years, a lot has changed, not just about the technology, but about the job itself. 'We might be ‘just' doing systems administration, but that role has moved heavily into managing security, controlling access to a wide range of resources, analyzing network traffic, scrutinizing log files, and fixing the chinks on our cyber armor,’ writes Henry-Stocker. What hasn’t changed? Systems administration remains a largely thankless role with little room for career advancement, albeit one that she is quick to note is ‘seldom boring’ and ‘reasonably' well-paid.
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Submission Apple, Microsoft Tout Their Privacy Policies To Get Positive PR->

jfruh writes: Apple hasn't changed its privacy policy in more than a year — but that didn't stop the company from putting up a glossy website explaining it in layman's terms. Microsoft too has been touting its respect for its users's privacy. This doesn't represent any high-minded altruism on those companies' parts, of course; it's part of their battle against Google, their archrival that offers almost all of its services for free and makes its money mining user data.
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Submission Uber's Rivals Forming An International Alliance->

jfruh writes: Didi Kuaidi is China's biggest native ride-sharing app, and it's using its cash hoard to build an alliance and global giant Uber. On the heels of a $100 million investment in Lyft, the company is also investing in Ola, India's biggest entry in the market. The deals have been described as involving sharing technology and market knowledge.
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Submission Europe Agrees To Agree With Everyone Except US What 5G Should Be->

itwbennett writes: Following agreements signed by the EU with South Korea in June 2014 and with Japan in May 2015, the EU and China 'have agreed to agree by the end of the year on a working definition for 5G,' reports Peter Sayer. 'About the only point of agreement so far is that 5G is what we'll all be building or buying after 4G, so any consensus between the EU and China could be significant,' says Sayer.
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Submission 7% Of Americans Were Victims Of Identity Theft In 2014->

jfruh writes: Nearly 18 million people were victims of identity theft in the U.S. last year — an alarmingly high number that nevertheless has held steady for the last several years. Victims spanned racial groups and income levels, and about 40% had their credit card or bank accounts compromomised.
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Submission EFF To Offer Trusted SSL Certificates To the Public, For Free->

itwbennett writes: The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has jumped through all the necessary hoops to become a certificate authority and soon will begin offering trusted SSL certificates to the public, for free. The official certificate authority is called Let's Encrypt and it just issued its first certificate 10 days ago, but it has not yet been added as a trusted authority. Let's Encrypt has set a public availability date of November 14th 2015, at which time their root certificate will have been cross-signed and the general public will be able to obtain free, trusted certificates.
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Submission IBM's Watson Is Now Analyzing Your Vacation Photos->

jfruh writes: IBM's Jeopardy-winning supercomputer Watson is now suite of cloud-based services that developers can use to add cognitive capabilities to applications, and one of its powers is visual analysis. Visual Insights analyzes images and videos posted to services like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, then looks for patterns and trends in what people have been posting. Watson turns what it gleans into structured data, making it easier to load into a database and act upon — which is clearly appealing to marketers and just as clearly carries disturbing privacy implications.
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Submission HP Adds Protection Against Firmware Attacks to Enterprise Printers->

itwbennett writes: Researchers have been demonstrating attacks against printers for years. Now, Hewlett-Packard has started building defenses directly into its printers' firmware instead of just patching individual vulnerabilities. The company's new M506, M527 and M577 series of LaserJet Enterprise printers, set to go on sale in October and November, will have built-in detection for unauthorized BIOS and firmware modifications.
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Submission Hack iOS 9 and Get $1 Million, Cybersecurity Firm Says->

itwbennett writes: Exploit acquisition company Zerodium has $3 million to buy iOS jailbreaks. 'Eligible submissions must include a full chain of unknown, unpublished, and unreported vulnerabilities/exploits (aka zero-days) which are combined to bypass all iOS 9 exploit mitigations including: ASLR, sandboxes, rootless, code signing, and boot chain,' Zerodium said on its iOS 9 Bug Bounty page
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Submission Legislation Requiring Tech Industry To Report Terrorist Activity Dropped->

itwbennett writes: John Ribeiro reports that 'the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee has dropped a provision that would have required Internet companies to report on vaguely-defined terrorist activity on their platforms.' The draft legislation, which was unanimously passed by the Committee in July, was widely derided by the tech industry for its technical difficulty and by users for invasion of privacy.
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Submission Michigan Sues HP Over Decade Long, $49 Million Incomplete Project->

itwbennett writes: On Friday, embattled HP was hit with a new lawsuit filed by the state of Michigan over a 10-year-old, $49 million project that called for HP to replace a legacy mainframe-based system built in the 1960s. Through the suit filed in Kent County Circuit Court, the state seeks $11 million in damages along with attorney's fees and the funds needed to rebid and reprocure the contract.
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Submission U.K. Man Gets Britain's First Ever Conviction For Illegal Drone Use->

jfruh writes: Nigel Wilson of Nottingham was quite a drone enthusiast: he flew a drone over a Champions League soccer match low enough to startle police horses, and at other times flew drones over iPro Stadium in Derby, the Emirates Stadium in north London, and near the Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace, the HMS Belfast and the Shard tower in London. He's been convicted under the Air Navigation Order 2009 and fined £1,800.
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Submission Intel Kills a Top-of-the-Line Processor->

itwbennett writes: In June of this year, Intel announced a processor branded as Broadwell-C. Now, the company has confirmed that the part was cancelled but would not give an official reason. Why did Intel kill the Broadwell-C? ITworld's Andy Patrizio speculates that it's a 'combination of increased cost, lower yield and potential product cannibalization' — cannibalization of the company's newly-launched Skylake processor, which the Broadwell-C outperformed.
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"The urge to destroy is also a creative urge." -- Bakunin [ed. note - I would say: The urge to destroy may sometimes be a creative urge.]