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Comment: Re: If you hate Change so much...... (Score 1) 451

by jbolden (#49138973) Attached to: Users Decry New Icon Look In Windows 10

As you decrease unnecessary color those colors that exist become much more visible from far away (i.e. at small sizes). Think about a match sized fire in a completely dark room or a single drop of red paint on a giant white wall. Decreasing distracting information increases the information density you can absorb.

Comment: Re: If you hate Change so much...... (Score 1) 451

by jbolden (#49138943) Attached to: Users Decry New Icon Look In Windows 10

I haven't seen an increase in screen sizes over the last few years. Moreover screen sizes as people migrate to smaller form factors like tablet style laptops are quite likely to go down not up. And you add in things like 2-3 pixels repeated a 5-10x across the screen x 1/2 dozen of these type of wastes and you are in the 100 pixels of waste. That can be something like 15% wasted space.

Comment: Re:If you hate Change so much...... (Score 3, Interesting) 451

by jbolden (#49136293) Attached to: Users Decry New Icon Look In Windows 10

Yes they are. The new style of design allows for less borders between boxes which makes screens more efficient in how they use space. Being able to visually comprehend more on a screen occupying the same physical space is an upgrade.

Moreover once you introduce touch and thus have an inaccurate pointing device borderless works far better since you want the pointing device to be closest center not border and except for circles that's not going to be the same thing.

Comment: Re:git blame (Score 1) 276

by jbolden (#49128665) Attached to: Moxie Marlinspike: GPG Has Run Its Course

True. Good point. AFAIK the way Microsoft handles that is you send what you want. Exchange forwards the email to Microsoft. The recipient gets a link they can only open via. their Microsoft Live account. For those with servers using Windows Azure Rights Management it goes through transparently.

So still annoying but getting better. Main thing is it is part of Outlook.

Comment: Re:Companies ask for it (Score 1) 185

by jbolden (#49127705) Attached to: Jury Tells Apple To Pay $532.9 Million In Patent Suit

You are right enforcement is difficult. The problem is upstream.

1) We need to have a discussion if as a society we want software patents to exist at all. We may want to consider software to be more like a book and so simply not subject to patents at all.
2) Assuming we do the rules regarding patenting math / code need to be tightened. Most people in the tech field what an innovation to have to be far greater to be worthy of a patent.
3) For this to happen the patent office doesn't do enough research. They need to verify originality. Also going back to the policy that a patent requires submitting a functional prototype. They also can help out in determining if a violation is taking place in advance rather than this being a function of the courts.
4) However they can't do this because there are too many patents. Patents are fundamentally too cheap. Patents need to be much much more expensive to pay for the research requires to enforce 1-3.
5) There needs to be better good faith licensing terms like in Europe. Violations need to be sanely priced but easier to prove.

Comment: Re:Patent reform will never happen (Score -1, Flamebait) 185

by jbolden (#49127625) Attached to: Jury Tells Apple To Pay $532.9 Million In Patent Suit

The big fish hate the current patent regime to the point Obama and many Democrats made a stink about it. The problem for patents are centered on tech and that's a Democratic constituency. The move for more aggressive enforcement is really centered on a group of Republican judges.

Comment: Re:Let me explain.... :-) (Score 2) 276

by jbolden (#49126137) Attached to: Moxie Marlinspike: GPG Has Run Its Course

I've always thought the best people to handle community signatures is banks. Banks are already trusted. Banks are used to and setup for verifying identity. Generate a key on USB and submit to a bank which verifies your real life keys for a marginal fee. They could also optionally store a copy of the private key for you in case of loss.

For not tied to your real life accounts... there is no need for verification the email provider can just self sign.

Comment: Re:Another bad omen for privacy and security (Score 1) 276

by jbolden (#49126103) Attached to: Moxie Marlinspike: GPG Has Run Its Course

I agree with your post. In the 1990s there was a lot of enthusiasm around crypto.

I think what's happening though is groups like Apple and Google have made crypto pretty easy. Since the original article mentions email, for example in Apple's standard / free / included mail.app I can easily:

a) self sign a certificate and include the public key in my email
b) send an encrypted email to anyone who has ever sent me their certificate

Similarly with the iPhone / iPad application. That's a pretty good implementation. It isn't perfect since it isn't obvious to the user how to move certificates around systems so multiple devices does lose some user friendliness. This all works automatically with Exchange.

So I think we are getting user friendly it is just taking a long time. Email is an area where I blame Microsoft for not acting like a leader and driving standards.

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