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Comment: Re:Hosted in the US? (Score 1) 83

by perpenso (#47970247) Attached to: Service Promises To Leak Your Documents If the Government Murders You

Upload the file(s) as a single encrypted image file. Break that image into stripes. Store each stripe and the decryption key in a different legal jurisdiction? Not foolproof but it does make it more difficult for a single entity.

If you do that, how is the site supposed to publish your documents in the event of your death? They're going to have to get access to the data so they can do the job.

You only do the uploading of the image. The service does the striping and jurisdictionally diverse storage.

Comment: Station wagon full of tapes ... (Score 3, Interesting) 83

by perpenso (#47969985) Attached to: Service Promises To Leak Your Documents If the Government Murders You

The USA would have the keys to all of them, since they seem to 0wnz the entire world's internet. (NSA spying on all the pipes, etc.)

Believe it or not, it is possible to move digital information (like a key) around the world without using the internet.

Drive that station wagon full of tapes to a port and have the station wagon loaded into a cargo container? :-)

Comment: Re:Hosted in the US? (Score 1) 83

by perpenso (#47969923) Attached to: Service Promises To Leak Your Documents If the Government Murders You

But then stopping any of the stripes will stop the entire revelation.

OK. That's not the problem I was trying to address, but I think striping can help here too.

Rather than an additive approach use a subtractive approach. For instance instead of each site having only 1 of 3 pieces, it has 2 of 3 pieces - 1 piece missing. Each site is missing some number of stripes, so a single entity can not read on its own. However there would be redundancy in that any particular stripe is in more than one jurisdiction. So coordination between jurisdictions is need for both release and denial. Again, not foolproof.

Comment: NYSE:BABA Cayman Islands variable-interest entity (Score 1) 118

by perpenso (#47957431) Attached to: Is Alibaba Comparable To a US Company?

Alibaba Group Holding Limited (NYSE: BABA) is a publicly traded Hangzhou-based group of Internet-based e-commerce businesses, including business-to-business online web portals, online retail and payment services, a shopping search engine and data-centric cloud computing services.

That business is **not** what is traded on the NYSE under BABA. What is actually traded is a Cayman Islands "variable-interest entity". It seems that foreigners are not allowed to own shares in the business you describe.
http://www.marketwatch.com/sto...

Comment: US investors don't have shares in Alibaba ... (Score 4, Insightful) 118

by perpenso (#47957401) Attached to: Is Alibaba Comparable To a US Company?
You seem to be speaking of Alibaba the Chinese retailer, so you are off on a tangent since that is not what US investors are putting their money into.

What US investors are buying is interest in a Cayman Island “variable-interest entity”. Stockholders won't have the usual influence on corporate governance or management, such as it is. My understanding is that Chinese law doesn't allow foreigners to own a Chinese strategic asset. So this Cayman Island entity was created.

http://www.marketwatch.com/sto...

Comment: US investors don't own Alibaba the retailer ... (Score 5, Informative) 190

by perpenso (#47952361) Attached to: Why a Chinese Company Is the Biggest IPO Ever In the US

On the other hand who owns Alibaba's 120 billion? Americans now.

US investors don't own Alibaba, the Chinese retail giant. Chinese law doesn't allow foreigners to own a Chinese strategic asset. What US investors are buying is interest in a Cayman Island “variable-interest entity”. Stockholders won't have the usual influence on corporate governance or management.
http://www.marketwatch.com/sto...

Comment: Was Blackberry ever secure ? (Score 1) 503

by perpenso (#47939317) Attached to: Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

Blackberry used to be secure until they wanted to sell phones in India and the Indian government demanded a backdoor in order for them to sell phones there.

Was Blackberry ever secure? I thought that they always had the user's encryption key. No backdoors or changes necessary. It was simply that the government demanded that they turn over the user keys that they already possessed.

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