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Comment: Re:Even worse. (Score 1) 289

Read the law? Are you crazy? Without that we can't have "blah, blah, blah... Obama is Hitler, blah, blah, blah". You might think ObamaHitler propaganda is bad, but we need it. It has electrolytes. It's what plants crave. If you pull the plug on ObamaHitle propaganda, a good chunk of the economy could collapse.

Comment: Closest I came to an Easter Egg (Score 1) 290

by istartedi (#49406957) Attached to: Is This the Death of the Easter Egg?

The closest I came to an Easter Egg was putting the string "EREIAMJH" in code some place. I don't recall exactly. Perhaps it was off the end of the simple help text in a CLI app or something. There were a few times I'd stick that in code. It'd only be visible to somebody running strings on the code or something. It's very few bytes. No additional execution is involved. It's a Brazil reference in case you're wondering.

Comment: Re:Oklahoma, as an example (Score 4, Informative) 143

The USA in general has more forest now then it did 100 years ago. The first industrial revolution was really hard on trees. For example, In NorCal there is a town called Guerneville. Next to the Safeway you can read a historical marker that explains it was once called "stumptown". Reason? Redwoods cut down to make railroad ties and other structures. Guerneville is now surrounded by 2nd growth redwood. It looks great, even if you know that it's not the amazing beauty that it must have been before.

Comment: Re:Why would a PDP8 be expensive? (Score 1) 92

by istartedi (#49357449) Attached to: Rebuilding the PDP-8 With a Raspberry Pi

Absent interference in the market by governments and/or corporations, price is determined by supply and demand, not capability. I can't think of any rational reason for anybody to interfere with the market for PDP8s, so I'm going to assume it's a free market. Although economic theory with its neat little graphs might give one the impression that it's some kind of science, the actual shape of the supply and demand graphs (and thus the equilibrium price) are determined by emotional "ugly bags of mostly water".

Comment: Re:Time (Score 1) 298

by istartedi (#49357217) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Makes Some Code Particularly Good?

Scrolled down for this. I would add, "time and testing" and "testing" usually involves wide distribution. Yes, JPEG, PNG and Open Source compression libraries have had bugs, sometimes very serious ones. I still consider it some of the best code out there. I don't think being able to read the code matters. That's a red herring, unless you need to work on it. If everybody needs to work on it, it's too unfinished to be particularly good code. The only thing I've read in some of these libraries is the headers, and mostly the comments in there. It was literally self-documenting in comments the last time I looked at it. That's some good code.

Comment: Re:End the Fed! (Score 1) 160

by istartedi (#49332017) Attached to: Energy Company Trials Computer Servers To Heat Homes

Not to mention that many diseases were a death sentence in 1913. Sure, health care was cheap. The doctor would take a chicken in trade; but all he had was a black bag. Appendicitis? surgical mortality was much higher. Polio? No vaccine. That's why FDR was in a wheel chair. Today? We can even cure some cancers if we catch them in time. Yeah, paying premiums sucks. I just paid mine today. Hate it; but I have no desire to go back to 1913.

Comment: The design is relatively simple (Score 2) 341

by istartedi (#49331939) Attached to: Feds Attempt To Censor Parts of a New Book About the Hydrogen Bomb

The design of the bombs is not the problem. Getting fissile material to build the trigger is the problem. Even a large corporation could probably not enrich uranium without attracting attention. Unless the book contains some method that Joe Sixpack can use to leach highly-enriched uranium from tailings or something, it's not a threat.

Comment: Reminds me of my old decision process (Score 1) 110

by istartedi (#49311225) Attached to: A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute

It's been years since I've thought about it. When I was young and first got exposed to the whole concept of "making big decisions" I realized something. The process was like this: 1. Gather data. 2. Make chart of pros-and cons. 3. Come up with some kind of way to weight the data, ultimately arriving at some numbers that suggested the best course of action. 4. Screw it all and go with your gut.

It's obvious to think that you could cut out the first 3 steps. The big revelation for me was to realize that while steps 1-3 were important, the disappointment I felt over the numerical outcome was important too. It was like there was symbiosis between data and emotion.

An extreme example of "only looking at numbers" came to me in my late 30s. It was suggested that I should remain on the East Coast because "taxes are high in California".

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