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Comment Re:On the Morton-Thiokol test range (Score 1) 320

Not the original naysayer, but I can answer those questions. I'll do half so others can prove their own inside info.

1) Charlie Murphy, self-taught electronics genius, designed nearly all the DIDACS hardware that plugged into the NEFF. So mostly likely him, working with Mark Momcilovich on the software side.

2) Doug Sprout, because it was on the PDP and not on Leonard's SEL system - but I don't know which PDP, probably Ernest?

If you were there, you'll know who I am by my slashdot username. :)

Comment Nice Feynman reference (Score 1) 234

Idiot Xians believe the Bible is infallible in detail, when the majority merely believes that it is a powerful, meaningful book that can lead to insight regarding both moral behavior and the history of the Jewish people and the Judeo-Christian faiths.

Idiot Buddhists worship Buddha as a deity, and idiot Jains don't understand the nature of atheistic religion, and idiot Jews think that all Xians are alike in their beliefs, and idiot atheists think that atheism is fundamentally incompatible with all religion. Idiot agnostics don't know what "agnostic" means (but they still come out the least idiotic in the idiot sweepstakes).

If you want the minimum number of idiots around you, join a Unitarian Universalist church. But sadly you'll find that "minimum number" does not actually equate to "zero."

Comment Re:On the Morton-Thiokol test range (Score 1) 320

As I remember it, Boisjoly and a couple other engineers told their management "if you launch lives will be lost." The Mormons (which is what we called corporate upper management after Morton Salt bought out Thiokol) called NASA and said "our engineers say you mustn't launch" to which the NASA boys replied "we know what we are doing, don't worry about it". The Mormons told the engineering staff "we talked to NASA, they say it's OK, they will launch". Boisjoly, believing that the Salt Boys (another nickname for corporate) hadn't conveyed the severity of the situation to NASA, then called NASA himself and said "if you launch lives will be lost". At which point NASA said "sure, sure, thanks for calling" and then immediately called the Salt Jockeys and said "You have a loose cannon and you need to tie it down immediately, shut this asshole up". Then they launched and killed seven astronauts, which ruined the President's speech celebrating the first teacher in space, but luckily Peggy Noonan was able to quickly plagiarize John Magee's poem High Flight to provide a new speech in response to the disaster.

Of course it was a long time ago, but that's how I remember it going down. I was working at the Elkton plant, so I wasn't directly involved with shuttle SRBs.

Comment Cameras are so, so tiny these days (Score 4, Insightful) 233

You cannot physically enforce security of code sources you are allowing people to see - unless you are going to have them work entirely naked, under constant physical observation, with full body cavity searches every time they enter or leave the workroom.

Hire someone trustworthy, pay them well, and have them work on-site. That is the path to success. Anything else is almost guaranteed to create the situation you're trying to avoid; paranoia breeds dissent and distrust breeds subterfuge.

Comment Re:MOD PARENT UP (Score 1) 388

Delaware? The state that's home to every 30 percent credit card in the country?

I'm afraid I don't know if that's true or false. Is there a reason I should care either way?

I'll note in passing that libertarians usually support the idea that lenders should be able to charge whatever interest the customer agrees to pay, though.

Comment Re:Why the emphasis on Lets Encrypt? (Score 5, Informative) 123

Most other CAs have cert lifetimes of a year (or longer). Then the question surfaces - how useful is cert revocation? Do all TLS clients check for cert revocation?

Most SSL/TLS clients do not check for a relevant CRL. The few that do (such as Firefox and other web browsers) typically require configuration and won't check for revocation by default out of the box.

In contrast, nearly all SSL/TLS clients that I am aware of (certain MTAs being an exception) will refuse to use an expired certificate unless specifically instructed to do so by the end user. So expiration is more likely to have an effect than revocation.

Comment MOD PARENT UP (Score 3, Interesting) 388

I don't know what situation would really require a switchblade, either, but I think that's a poor reason to make them illegal. Needing to have a compelling reason for things to be legal is a shitty way to run a society. Things should only be made illegal if there is an overwhelmingly compelling reason to do so.

Base principle of effective government right there.

Complexity is the enemy of reliability, and when laws are most numerous, the state is most corrupt (with sincere apologies to Alan Robertson, Tacitus, and Sun Tzu).

The Georgists who moved to Arden, Delaware with the same basic idea as the Free Staters (that is, to go to a small state where their ideas would have more impact on society) had a long-term positive effect on the area, reaching even beyond Delaware's borders. People who are willing to pull up roots and work in order to achieve their ideas - people who are willing to strive towards their goals - sometimes build vibrant, dynamic and productive communities... although not always, as the ruins of Salubria and Icaria attest.

Comment Re:GM producers are shooting themselves in the foo (Score 1) 514

ve said this before -- if you want labels to differentiate, then add a label to non-GMO food (and obviously, enforce truth-in-advertising laws on that). That's not something that a producer of GMO food can reasonably lobby to prevent.

"Reasonable" has nothing to do with it.

In Pennsylvania the big dairies tried to make it illegal to use a "no BGH" label on milk, regardless of whether such a label was accurate or not.

Similarly, the so-called "DARK act" (stupid name) would allow genetically engineered organisms to be marketed with "all natural" labels, in order to defeat negative labeling.

It seems to me that this whole thing smells like a clever attempt by certain corporate powers to undermine a hundred years of consumer information law. They probably don't really care about GMOs so much as they care about regulatory capture.

They want to go back to the caveat emptor era. This is just a skirmish in that ongoing war. They've already crushed the USDA, after all, now they are going after the FDA.

Comment Re:Not actually that bad... (Score 1, Interesting) 387

I read the article...

You must be new here.

...expecting to read Bill slamming NASCAR, but in reality he acknowledges the excitement of speed in a race and the level of engineering involved which is why he suggested a fuel limit to spur advancements in fuel consumption (due to the competitive nature of the race and the engineering component that already exists).

Oh, stop interfering with the narrative. It's important to discredit Bill Nye because he might believe in global warming or something equally non-slashdottish. He probably doesn't even get a woody whenever nuclear power is mentioned! You shouldn't be telling people that he's actually suggested a way to make NASCAR more of an engineering challenge, you're messing everything up with your "facts" and "objective viewpoint".

Comment We used to call those tenements (Score 1) 412

All the downsides of a small rural community (everybody knows everything you're doing and they all gossip so you live inside a potentially absurd reputation maintenance loop) combined with all the downsides of city apartments (you don't really own anything and are subject to the arbitrary decisions of the owners and politicals).

America was for many immigrants a chance to escape the tenements of Europe and carve a new life out of the American Indian...

But if you hate and fear the challenges of freedom, and want to live your life in a totally safe space, maybe tenements are perfect? I dunno.

Comment It should be a plugin, not a feature. (Score 1) 134

what's wrong with firefox sync?

It should be a plugin. I don't want it, don't need it, and it gets in my way because it's on by default. I've deactivated it on three systems this week alone.

I find it pretty useful.

That's exactly why it should be available to you as a plugin.

Firefox was created because Mozilla (now seamonkey) was too bloated. The stated design philosophy of FF was that a browser should browse the web, and have no other features except as provided by way of rich plugin support.

I don't run FF without SDC and Noscript. But I wouldn't dream of inflicting my needs on everyone else who runs the browser... apparently the devs of sync, pocket and hello feel differently.

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