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Comment: Re:Hmmm ... (Score 1) 122

by quantaman (#48685685) Attached to: Sony Accused of Pirating Music In "The Interview"

Almost certainly this was just some production screwup. Someone at Sony thought the the license was taken care, because of that they stopped calling back and the music never got licensed.

What probably happened was the music supervisor was working on getting the clearance right up until the day of the hack, and he hasn't been able to get onto his computer since -- all of the PCs at Sony have been down ever since the Day because they're doing a huge forensic audit. And then a week went by and Sony announced they weren't going to release the movie, and the music sup just forgot about locking down the last licensing deal since it seemed like a dead letter.

And then Sony announced they were going to screen the movie with one days notice and they rushed the due-diligence.

I don't think they're related, the film was almost ready to release when the hack occurred meaning they had a final or very nearly final cut. I don't see Sony putting themselves in the position of having not-yet licensed music in the final cut, that gives the publisher far too much leverage when negotiating terms.

Comment: Ask yourself (Score 1) 57

by sjames (#48685589) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With Companies With Poor SSL Practices?

What are the actual risks? Just how likely is it that someone will breech your email and what would the consequences be? What would you suggest as an alternative means of delivering both password and password changes?

Consider that if the lost password procedure involves email, then there is no security benefit to keeping passwords out of email (the key to getting a valid password is just as harmful as the actual password if it leaks).

Comment: Re:Please shame whomever it is (Score 1) 57

by Shavano (#48685463) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With Companies With Poor SSL Practices?

And make sure that that password manager is only able to run locally and NEVER transfer your password file, even though it's encrypted, via a non-secure means. If you have it on a mobile device make sure your device settings prevent it from being uploaded to a server that you do not own.

Comment: Re:Hmmm ... (Score 1) 122

by quantaman (#48685457) Attached to: Sony Accused of Pirating Music In "The Interview"

So, once again, if we do this we get crushed under the heel of a team of lawyers.

But a multinational like Sony does it and I bet they'll just dicker and claim some bullshit like fair use they routinely deny exists.

I sincerely hope Sony has to pay a massive fine for this ... something on par with what we'd get beat down with.

They should get decently hammered though I don't think it should be crazy. The summary suggests Sony wilfully used the song despite knowing they didn't have a license, but that's a stretch based on the quote from the label

“There were initial discussions for using ‘Pay Day‘ in the movie, but at some point, the discussions ceased and we assumed that it would not follow through,” Feel Ghood Music says.

Almost certainly this was just some production screwup. Someone at Sony thought the the license was taken care, because of that they stopped calling back and the music never got licensed.

Comment: Re:Hmmm ... (Score 1) 118

by ultranova (#48684987) Attached to: Sony Accused of Pirating Music In "The Interview"

If we do it, people say that no one loses anything if you make a copy, and that sharing has been part of human culture for ages. These people should have nothing to whine about if Sony then goes to do the same thing.

Sony has been one of the advocates for de facto life-ruining punishment for copyright violation. They will almost certainly continue being that in the future too. So why shouldn't they get hoisted by their own petard when it turns out they're not just cruel but also hypocrites? Avenge their victims and dethrone the malefactor.

Comment: Re:You mean first POTUS to program while in office (Score 1) 65

by Shavano (#48684873) Attached to: White House Touts Obama's 1-Liner as 2014 Tech Highlight

Carter graduated from the Naval Academy in 1946. Clinton studied politics and law in the 60's and early 70's. There wasn't much chance back then to program in those programs. However, Clinton had a reputation of being always curious about details and it wouldn't be at all surprising if he asked somebody to show him how to make a computer do what he wanted it to do at some point, maybe to help Chelsea with her schoolwork.

Comment: Re:No unicomp ? (Score 1) 139

by JanneM (#48683833) Attached to: Know Your Type: Five Mechanical Keyboards Compared

And no Happy Hacking Pro. That's my go-to keyboard for any stationary use.

I do like the feel of the new chicklet Lenovo Thinkpads as well; I don't know why many people don't like them. Whoever decided on the layout, though (PrtSc between right-alt and ctrl?!) should be sent to the unemployment line as fast as possible.

Comment: Re:Millions used this... one complained. (Score 1) 192

by quantaman (#48682925) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes For 'Year In Review' Photos

I didn't complain but I found some of the pictures it unearthed to be painful reminders, the early part of the year was lousy for me individually which evolved to be generally fantastic. Nevertheless, I think it's legit to complain and remind them that we upload pictures for a number of reasons, and the emotions attached to them change a lot over a year. Complaining in the form of feedback is perfectly acceptable. It's the incessant lawsuits and mass media editorials that wear on our nerves.

I think the reasonable solution is to make this an optional feature that they advertise for instead of just dump on your page. Even allow you to choose the photos to show and save for posterity.

I agree. The photo on mine was completely innocuous but I'd still rather it never showed up.

Facebook seems to have forgotten the fact that they're a social network, people tend to care about the social signals they send out, and the year in review sends out a message on their behalf that they may not like.

I have my own standard for things I like to post, some random photo from my feed surrounded by tacky dancing figures isn't the kind of message I'd send out or want associated with myself. It's not a big deal, but then again not using Facebook isn't much of a big deal either. Between things like this and the feed ads I don't use Facebook as much more than an instant messaging service.

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