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Comment: Related CNET article (Score 1) 2

by SternisheFan (#47933909) Attached to: Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police
Just days after Apple CEO Tim Cook discussed the company's privacy record with Charlie Rose, Apple has published a new privacy policy that explains how it handles its users' personal information and government requests for that information.

In an open letter published Wednesday, Cook reiterated points he made during the interview with Rose, in which he said Apple takes "a very different view" of privacy than its Silicon Valley brethren, which often make a business out of collecting and leveraging customer information.

"We don't build a profile based on your email content or Web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don't 'monetize' the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don't read your email or your messages to get information to market to you," Cook wrote in the letter, which was published on Apple's privacy page.

On the heels of the release of several private, nude images of celebrities pilfered from Apple iCloud accounts, the new privacy section includes guidelines from protecting online accounts. After an Apple investigation determined that the image release was the result of a targeted attack on individual accounts and not poor security on its part, Cook said the company would bolster its security alert system on the online storage service.

In addition to reactivating iCloud's two-factor identity verification system earlier this week, Apple urged customers to use of strong passwords and said iCloud data is encrypted while in transit, and in most cases, during storage.

Cook's letter also sought to reassure Apple's customers that their data was safe from the prying eyes of government surveillance agencies, which have reportedly procured information on electronic communications from Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo, among others.

"I want to be absolutely clear that we have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services," Cook said. "We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will."

The same policy now applies to users' personal portable devices, Cook wrote. He noted that data on devices running iOS 8, the new mobile operating system Apple released Wednesday, are protected by users' personal passcodes that Apple can't bypass.

"So it's not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8," Cook wrote.

http://www.cnet.com/news/tim-c...

+ - Study Finds Link Between Artificial Sweeteners and Glucose Intolerance

Submitted by onproton
onproton (3434437) writes "The journal Nature released a study today that reveals a link between the consumption of artificial sweeteners and the development of glucose intolerance, a leading risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, citing a critical alteration of intestinal bacteria. Paradoxically, these non-caloric sweeteners, which can be up to 20,000 times sweeter than natural sugars, are often recommended to diabetes patients to control blood glucose levels. Sugar substitutes have come under additional fire lately from studies showing that eating artificially sweetened foods can lead to greater overall calorie consumption and even weight gain. While some, especially food industry officials, remain highly skeptical of such studies, more research still needs to be done to determine the actual risks these substances may pose to health."

+ - Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police-> 2

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "By Craig Timberg September 17 at 9:51 PM
Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user data.

The move, announced with the publication of a new privacy policy tied to the release of Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, amounts to an engineering solution to a legal dilemma: Rather than comply with binding court orders, Apple has reworked its latest encryption in a way that makes it almost impossible for the company – or anyone else but the device’s owner – to gain access to the vast troves of user data typically stored on smartphones or tablet computers.

The key is the encryption that Apple mobile devices automatically put in place when a user selects a passcode, making it difficult for anyone who lacks that passcode to access the information within, including photos, e-mails, recordings or other documents. Apple once kept possession of encryption keys that unlocked devices for legally binding police requests, but will no longer do so for iOS8, it said in a new guide for law enforcement.

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” Apple said on its Web site. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”"

Link to Original Source

+ - Snowden's Leaks Didn't Help Terrorists 1

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "The Interecept reports that contrary to lurid claims made by U.S. officials, a new independent analysis of Edward Snowden’s revelations on NSA surveillance that examined the frequency of releases and updates of encryption software by jihadi groups has found no correlation in either measure to Snowden’s leaks about the NSA’s surveillance techniques. According to the report "well prior to Edward Snowden, online jihadists were already aware that law enforcement and intelligence agencies were attempting to monitor them (PDF).” In fact, concerns about terrorists' use of sophisticated encryption technology predates even 9/11.

Earlier this month former NSA head Michael Hayden stated, “The changed communications practices and patterns of terrorist groups following the Snowden revelations have impacted our ability to track and monitor these groups”, while Matthew Olsen of the National Counterterrorism Centre would add “Following the disclosure of the stolen NSA documents, terrorists are changing how they communicate to avoid surveillance.” Snowden’s critics have previously accused his actions of contributing from everything from the rise of ISIS to Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine. "This most recent study is the most comprehensive repudiation of these charges to date," says Murtaza Hussain. "Contrary to lurid claims to the contrary, the facts demonstrate that terrorist organizations have not benefited from the NSA revelations, nor have they substantially altered their behavior in response to them.""

Comment: Re:More importantly (Score 1) 308

by SternisheFan (#47930205) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

More importantly, the fact that the majority of the value in the car is in a perishable resource. That battery will NOT last forever, and when it needs a new one you'd be better off scrapping the entire car and buying a new one. How good is that for the environment?

Even if the battery is easily swapped out?

Comment: Re:Parallax. (Score 1) 401

by Khyber (#47927141) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

"Automobile magazines take pictures of cars from as far away as practical, so that the part of the car closer to the camera doesn't look substantially larger than the part of the car further from the lens."

Funny, most car magazines I have use forced perspective to make that front end look a lot bigger. That's everything from Auto Trader to Motorsports Magazine.

Comment: Re:Parallax. (Score 1) 401

by Khyber (#47927123) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

Yea. You're trying to argue with someone that deals with optics for a living (specifically, LED lighting and concentrating lenses.)

You can bring your insults around all you want. You're an amateur in the face of a global professional. This is why I've been on the BBC for making plants grow WITHOUT LIGHT AT ALL. I know light better than most anybody here on this site.

Comment: Re:No you don't. Saw your post history (Score 1) 401

by Khyber (#47927109) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

No, he didn't show shit. He posted nonsense without any backing links. He deliberately went off-topic to keep talking.

He's not going to be talking for much longer. People he's pissed off have his info, I have it now.

Do I dox or do I take care of business myself?

Comment: Re:Welcome to the world of "YOU FAIL", loser (Score 1) 401

by Khyber (#47927097) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

You annihilated nobody.

By the way, I know your address. Expect a few 'well-being' check ups, if not a visit from myself, personally, with the white coats in tow.

So 'secure' in your HOSTS that you forget that your personal info, which can do a lot more damage, is already out on the net thanks to people you've pissed off.

Comment: Re:Parallax. (Score 1) 401

by Khyber (#47927079) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

Zoom and telephoto are one and the same, just one is adjustable. Who's the one that needs to do their homework?

Oh, and go to Edmund Optics so you can get kits to MAKE YOUR OWN. You can get a 10mm-1000mm focal length kit for around $300.

Back to school for you. I've been at this for 17 years, since high school photography elective.

Comment: Re:Parallax. (Score 0) 401

by Khyber (#47923401) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

Hi, welcome to the world of 10mm-1000mm focal length telephoto lenses. You know, the ones so large you need to have an additional bipod minimum to support the lens while the tripod holds the camera. *shakes head* Seriously? How the hell do you think amateur astronomers get decent pictures of Jupiter and Saturn without a telescope? Lenses with a HUGE adjustable focal length, that are almost the size of the telescope itself. Might as well be a telescope at that point. Nice large aperture, too. AND THEN for shits and giggles you can throw a 5x Vivitar telezoom lens between that lens and the camera (assuming you have lenses using the same mount style.)

You must be confused with the DSLR world, thinking typical DSLR lenses. Plenty of HUGE lenses from back in the 60s even that have adapters to work with cameras of today.

Comment: Re:Parallax. (Score 1) 401

by Khyber (#47923377) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

Hey, look, someone else that OBVIOUSLY knows what they're talking about, opposed to the dozen or so other idiots on here that can't be bothered to DO THE RESEARCH THEMSELVES and come to the exact same conclusion.

Betting 10:1 Kyosuke, Graphius, etc are Apple fans talking absolute nonsense Especially graphius, who has never heard of anything with a possible 30X optical.

Comment: Re:Parallax. (Score 1) 401

by Khyber (#47923331) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

"Otherwise you wouldn't be trying to hide something using perspective from across a room."

You wouldn't for large objects, no. You would for small objects, as at smaller sizes and greater distances detail drops. It's like you failed some of that basic geometry, yourself. Do you even raster render or 3D model?

Comment: Re:Parallax. (Score 0) 401

by Khyber (#47921351) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

You very obviously have zero respect for the scientific process, which includes testing every angle, variable, or possibility.

So no, you're the one doing things wrong. Meanwhile, I've run through every available option and come to the conclusion that this is indeed photographic manipulation.

What've you done, again?

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