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Comment: Re:Disable Advertising (Score 2) 37

by SternisheFan (#47950513) Attached to: SteadyServ Helps Keep the Draft Beer Flowing (Video)
Right?! Can we have another category in the top left of the main page? You know,

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stories

submissions

popularstories

submissions

popular

blog

build NEW

ask slashdot

book reviews

games

idle

yro

slashvertisements

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So when I want to read a slashvertisement, I can go there?!!

+ - Intel Putting 3D Scanners in Consumer Tablets Next Year, Phones to Follow-> 1

Submitted by Zothecula
Zothecula (1870348) writes "Intel has been working on a 3D scanner small enough to fit in the bezel of even the thinnest tablets. The company aims to have the technology in tablets from 2015, with CEO Brian Krzanich telling the crowd at MakerCon in New York on Thursday that he hopes to put the technology in phones as well."
Link to Original Source

+ - Pot black market still thrives after Colorado legalization->

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Although recreational use of marijuana has been legal in the state of Colorado for nine months, some people are still choosing to buy it on the black market. Critics say legalization has created two systems: a legal market for those who can afford it and an underground market for people who can't. PBS NewsHour Special Correspondent Rick Karr reports from Denver.

(excerpted transcript from video below)

RICK KARR: One of the benefits attached to legalization was that it would eliminate the black market. But that market is still thriving, according to a 39 year old marijuana grower who asked us to call him John Doe and to conceal his identity because he sells on the underground market.

The illegal trade is doing especially well in black and Latino communities, and he says it works the same way it did when pot was illegal.

JOHN DOE: You have that one guy, that guy that shines, that’s the Robin Hood of the neighborhood. This man supplies a little ghetto area. Simple as that. Breaks his own pound into little ounces and helps everybody in his community. So they can afford it with him. That’s how it’s happened.

RICK KARR: Yeah. And that’s how it happened before, too.

JOHN DOE: Yeah. Yeah. Nothing’s changed.

RICK KARR: John Doe says low-income buyers turn to the black market because prices are higher at legal retail stores. There’s conflicting information, but an ounce of pot on the black market can cost as little as 180 dollars. At the store Andy Williams owns, you have to pay around 240 dollars for an ounce.

That’s partly because the price includes a 15 percent excise tax, a 10 percent marijuana tax, the state sales tax, and Denver’s marijuana sales tax.

LARISA BOLIVAR: The taxes are an overreach and excessive. And it’s a regressive tax and it impacts the poor most."

Link to Original Source

+ - Supermassive Black Hole Discovered Inside Tiny Dwarf Galaxy->

Submitted by mpicpp
mpicpp (3454017) writes "Astronomers using data from the Hubble Space Telescope say they've discovered a ginormous black hole within one of the tiniest galaxies known to exist.

The supermassive black hole is about five times more massive than the one at the center of the Milky Way, but the dwarf galaxy in which it was found--known to astronomers as M60-UCD1--is about 500 times smaller than our own galaxy, according to NASA.

"It is the smallest and lightest object that we know of that has a supermassive black hole," Dr. Anil C. Seth, a University of Utah astronomer and the lead author of a new paper about the discovery, said in a written statement. "It's also one of the most black hole-dominated galaxies known."

The discovery suggests that supermassive black holes may be twice as numerous in the nearby universe as previously thought, Nature reported."

Link to Original Source

+ - Local Motors to 3D Print More Cars, Then Boats, Planes & Satellites Are Next->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Local Motors last week 3D printed the first ever car from an ABS/carbon fiber composite. Now, their CEO, Jay Rogers, plans to 3D print additional car models, as well as "other kinds of vehicles. Boats, planes, [and] satellites." The company plans to open 100 microfactories throughout the world, and print with a number of new polymer materials."
Link to Original Source

+ - Russia to be disconnected from the Internet?-> 2

Submitted by GlowingCat
GlowingCat (2459788) writes "The issue of security of the Russian segment of the Internet will be a topic for discussion at the meeting of the Russian Security Council, with the participation of President Vladimir Putin and several high-ranking officials. The meeting will take place next week. According to various reports, the officials will make a number of decisions regulating the use of the Internet in Russia, providing for the ability to cut the Russian Internet, known as Runet, from the outside world, in case of emergency."
Link to Original Source

+ - Why Banana skins are slippery wins IgNobel->

Submitted by gbjbaanb
gbjbaanb (229885) writes "This year's Ig Nobel prize was won by Japanese researchers investigating why banana skins produced a frictionless surface compared to apple and orange peels.
(apparently "The polysaccharide follicular gels that give banana skins their slippery properties are also found in the membranes where our bones meet." so its not all fun and jollity)

Other prizes were awarded for noting that dogs only defecate when aligned with north-south magnetic fields, and that 'night owl' people are more likely to be psychopaths than early risers. Yes, that probably includes you."

Link to Original Source

+ - Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police-> 4

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "By Craig Timberg September 17 at 9:51 PM
Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user data.

The move, announced with the publication of a new privacy policy tied to the release of Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, amounts to an engineering solution to a legal dilemma: Rather than comply with binding court orders, Apple has reworked its latest encryption in a way that makes it almost impossible for the company – or anyone else but the device’s owner – to gain access to the vast troves of user data typically stored on smartphones or tablet computers.

The key is the encryption that Apple mobile devices automatically put in place when a user selects a passcode, making it difficult for anyone who lacks that passcode to access the information within, including photos, e-mails, recordings or other documents. Apple once kept possession of encryption keys that unlocked devices for legally binding police requests, but will no longer do so for iOS8, it said in a new guide for law enforcement.

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” Apple said on its Web site. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”"

Link to Original Source

+ - Snowden's Leaks Didn't Help Terrorists 1

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "The Interecept reports that contrary to lurid claims made by U.S. officials, a new independent analysis of Edward Snowden’s revelations on NSA surveillance that examined the frequency of releases and updates of encryption software by jihadi groups has found no correlation in either measure to Snowden’s leaks about the NSA’s surveillance techniques. According to the report "well prior to Edward Snowden, online jihadists were already aware that law enforcement and intelligence agencies were attempting to monitor them (PDF).” In fact, concerns about terrorists' use of sophisticated encryption technology predates even 9/11.

Earlier this month former NSA head Michael Hayden stated, “The changed communications practices and patterns of terrorist groups following the Snowden revelations have impacted our ability to track and monitor these groups”, while Matthew Olsen of the National Counterterrorism Centre would add “Following the disclosure of the stolen NSA documents, terrorists are changing how they communicate to avoid surveillance.” Snowden’s critics have previously accused his actions of contributing from everything from the rise of ISIS to Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine. "This most recent study is the most comprehensive repudiation of these charges to date," says Murtaza Hussain. "Contrary to lurid claims to the contrary, the facts demonstrate that terrorist organizations have not benefited from the NSA revelations, nor have they substantially altered their behavior in response to them.""

+ - Study Finds Link Between Artificial Sweeteners and Glucose Intolerance

Submitted by onproton
onproton (3434437) writes "The journal Nature released a study today that reveals a link between the consumption of artificial sweeteners and the development of glucose intolerance, a leading risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, citing a critical alteration of intestinal bacteria. Paradoxically, these non-caloric sweeteners, which can be up to 20,000 times sweeter than natural sugars, are often recommended to diabetes patients to control blood glucose levels. Sugar substitutes have come under additional fire lately from studies showing that eating artificially sweetened foods can lead to greater overall calorie consumption and even weight gain. While some, especially food industry officials, remain highly skeptical of such studies, more research still needs to be done to determine the actual risks these substances may pose to health."

Comment: Related CNET article (Score 1) 4

by SternisheFan (#47933909) Attached to: Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police
Just days after Apple CEO Tim Cook discussed the company's privacy record with Charlie Rose, Apple has published a new privacy policy that explains how it handles its users' personal information and government requests for that information.

In an open letter published Wednesday, Cook reiterated points he made during the interview with Rose, in which he said Apple takes "a very different view" of privacy than its Silicon Valley brethren, which often make a business out of collecting and leveraging customer information.

"We don't build a profile based on your email content or Web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don't 'monetize' the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don't read your email or your messages to get information to market to you," Cook wrote in the letter, which was published on Apple's privacy page.

On the heels of the release of several private, nude images of celebrities pilfered from Apple iCloud accounts, the new privacy section includes guidelines from protecting online accounts. After an Apple investigation determined that the image release was the result of a targeted attack on individual accounts and not poor security on its part, Cook said the company would bolster its security alert system on the online storage service.

In addition to reactivating iCloud's two-factor identity verification system earlier this week, Apple urged customers to use of strong passwords and said iCloud data is encrypted while in transit, and in most cases, during storage.

Cook's letter also sought to reassure Apple's customers that their data was safe from the prying eyes of government surveillance agencies, which have reportedly procured information on electronic communications from Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo, among others.

"I want to be absolutely clear that we have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services," Cook said. "We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will."

The same policy now applies to users' personal portable devices, Cook wrote. He noted that data on devices running iOS 8, the new mobile operating system Apple released Wednesday, are protected by users' personal passcodes that Apple can't bypass.

"So it's not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8," Cook wrote.

http://www.cnet.com/news/tim-c...

Comment: Re:More importantly (Score 1) 386

by SternisheFan (#47930205) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

More importantly, the fact that the majority of the value in the car is in a perishable resource. That battery will NOT last forever, and when it needs a new one you'd be better off scrapping the entire car and buying a new one. How good is that for the environment?

Even if the battery is easily swapped out?

+ - MIT's Cheetah Robot Runs Untethered->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "It's easy to make a robot walk, but hard to keep it from falling over. We've seen a number of crazy robot prototypes, but they're usually tethered and stuck on a treadmill. Now, researchers from MIT have developed an algorithm that allows their giant robot cheetah to run around outdoors at up to 10mph. They expect the robot to eventually hit speeds of 30mph. "The key to the bounding algorithm is in programming each of the robot’s legs to exert a certain amount of force in the split second during which it hits the ground, in order to maintain a given speed: In general, the faster the desired speed, the more force must be applied to propel the robot forward. ... Kim says that by adapting a force-based approach, the cheetah-bot is able to handle rougher terrain, such as bounding across a grassy field." The MIT cheetah-bot also runs on a custom electric motor, which makes it significantly quieter than gas-powered robots. "Our robot can be silent and as efficient as animals. The only things you hear are the feet hitting the ground.""
Link to Original Source

+ - What Is the Universe? Real Physics Has Some Mind-Bending Answers->

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Thhe questions are as big as the universe and (almost) as old as time: Where did I come from, and why am I here? That may sound like a query for a philosopher, but if you crave a more scientific response, try asking a cosmologist.

This branch of physics is hard at work trying to decode the nature of reality by matching mathematical theories with a bevy of evidence. Today most cosmologists think that the universe was created during the big bang about 13.8 billion years ago, and it is expanding at an ever-increasing rate. The cosmos is woven into a fabric we call space-time, which is embroidered with a cosmic web of brilliant galaxies and invisible dark matter.

It sounds a little strange, but piles of pictures, experimental data and models compiled over decades can back up this description. And as new information gets added to the picture, cosmologists are considering even wilder ways to describe the universe—including some outlandish proposals that are nevertheless rooted in solid science:"

Link to Original Source

I never cheated an honest man, only rascals. They wanted something for nothing. I gave them nothing for something. -- Joseph "Yellow Kid" Weil

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