Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

+ - Android "Not Compatible" Malware "maturing"->

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Mobile malware reaches new heights

By Cory Bennett — 11/20/14 04:58 PM EST
Cyber criminals are reaching a level of sophistication when targeting smartphones previously only seen in desktop computer attacks.

Mobile security research firm Lookout revealed findings on Thursday showing hackers can now effectively turn Android phones into so-called botnets, a compromised device that can be used to communicate with other infected devices for nefarious purposes.

The company estimates between 4 million and 4.5 million phones in the U.S. have been turned into botnets this year as a result.
For years, cybersecurity experts knew malware targeting smartphones was a growing threat as the Internet-connected devices became more ubiquitous.

Lookout thinks this malware shows the threat has finally taken a dangerous jump.

The malware has been getting onto smartphones by first infecting a legitimate website. When users visit that website from their phone, they unwittingly download the malicious code.

This particular strategy is “one of the first times hacked websites were used at a large scale to specifically target and infect mobile devices,” said Tim Strazzere, Lookout’s lead research and response engineer, in a blog post.

The malware behind it, dubbed NotCompatible, was initially “compelling threat” when the company started tracking it two years ago, Strazzere explained. But NotCompatible has evolved.

The newest iteration “set a new bar for mobile malware sophistication and operational complexity,” Strazzere said. “This malware is a prime example of how mobile malware complexity is advancing and is borrowing technical tactics already seen in PC malware.”

National Security Agency Director Michael Rogers sees mobile hacking as a Top 3 concern in 2015.

“The greatest growth these days” in cyberattacks “is not in the corporate fixed, large-network structures,” he testified before the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday.

“We are all turning to mobile digital devices as vehicles to enhance our productivity,” Rogers added.

That makes those devices a desirable target for hackers.

Lookout said the hackers behind the malware are renting out the infected devices to criminals who then conduct large-scale scams — from buying up tickets in bulk to sending out more spam.

“We expect more of this type of sophistication in mobile malware,” Strazzere said. “Mobile malware maturity is here.”"

Link to Original Source

Comment: LA Time article (Score 4, Informative) 337

by SternisheFan (#48390217) Attached to: Philae's Batteries Have Drained; Comet Lander Sleeps
From http://www.latimes.com/science...

Fifty-six hours after landing on the surface of a comet, Philae sent one more round of data about its new home across 310 million miles of space. Then, its power went out.

"@Rosetta, I'm feeling a bit tired, did you get all my data? I might take a nap..." read a message on the @philae2014 Twitter feed.

The Rosetta mission's twitter response: "You've done a great job Philae, something no spacecraft has ever done before."

All the experiments on board the lander had a chance to run and return information back to Earth. Philae's instruments scooped up material from the comet's surface, took its temperature, sent radio waves through its nucleus, and went hunting for hints of organic material. Cameras took the first panoramic images from the surface of a comet.

It has been a whirlwind ride for the lander, which was dropped onto the surface of the mountain-sized comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday morning. Two harpoons that were designed to tether it to the surface failed to fire, and scientists say the lander made two bounces before becoming stable. The first bounce caused the lander to go one-third of a mile into the air.

Friday morning, ESA officials expressed concern that the lander would not have enough battery power left to send back any more data from experiments it was conducting on its new, icy home.

When Philae landed on the comet on Wednesday, it had enough battery power for about 60 hours of work. Scientists initially hoped that it would continue to operate on solar power, but the lander seemed to have settled in a hole on the comet, where it was surrounded by rock-like structures that block the sun.

Stefan Ulamec, the lander manager from DLR, said the that one of the solar panels on the lander was getting about an hour and 20 minutes of sunlight a day. Two other panels got just 20 to 30 minutes a day, he said.

At a news conference Friday morning before the last signal was received, Ulamec said it was possible that scientists would not hear from the lander again.

"We are hoping to get contact again this evening, but it is not secured," he said. "Maybe the battery will be empty before it talks to us."

Happily, that turned out not to be the case. On Friday evening, ESA reported that all the science experiments had been deployed, and that the lander had been rotated 35 degrees in an attempt to get more sun on one of its larger solar panels.

There is a chance that as the comet flies closer to the sun, the increase in solar energy will allow ESA to communicate with Philae once again.

ESA officials say the odds of that happening are small, but with Philae, the little lander that could, anything is possible.

Comment: And..., battery's out of juice (Score 1) 223

by SternisheFan (#48389649) Attached to: Comet Probe Philae To Deploy Drill As Battery Life Wanes
From www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-philae-lander-data-20141114-htmlstory.html

Fifty-six hours after landing on the surface of a comet, Philae sent one more round of data about its new home across 310 million miles of space. Then, its power went out.

"@Rosetta, I'm feeling a bit tired, did you get all my data? I might take a nap..." read a message on the @philae2014 Twitter feed.

The Rosetta mission's twitter response: "You've done a great job Philae, something no spacecraft has ever done before."

All the experiments on board the lander had a chance to run and return information back to Earth. Philae's instruments scooped up material from the comet's surface, took its temperature, sent radio waves through its nucleus, and went hunting for hints of organic material. Cameras took the first panoramic images from the surface of a comet.

It has been a whirlwind ride for the lander, which was dropped onto the surface of the mountain-sized comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday morning. Two harpoons that were designed to tether it to the surface failed to fire, and scientists say the lander made two bounces before becoming stable. The first bounce caused the lander to go one-third of a mile into the air.

Friday morning, ESA officials expressed concern that the lander would not have enough battery power left to send back any more data from experiments it was conducting on its new, icy home.

When Philae landed on the comet on Wednesday, it had enough battery power for about 60 hours of work. Scientists initially hoped that it would continue to operate on solar power, but the lander seemed to have settled in a hole on the comet, where it was surrounded by rock-like structures that block the sun.

Stefan Ulamec, the lander manager from DLR, said the that one of the solar panels on the lander was getting about an hour and 20 minutes of sunlight a day. Two other panels got just 20 to 30 minutes a day, he said.

At a news conference Friday morning before the last signal was received, Ulamec said it was possible that scientists would not hear from the lander again.

"We are hoping to get contact again this evening, but it is not secured," he said. "Maybe the battery will be empty before it talks to us."

Happily, that turned out not to be the case. On Friday evening, ESA reported that all the science experiments had been deployed, and that the lander had been rotated 35 degrees in an attempt to get more sun on one of its larger solar panels.

There is a chance that as the comet flies closer to the sun, the increase in solar energy will allow ESA to communicate with Philae once again.

ESA officials say the odds of that happening are small, but with Philae, the little lander that could, anything is possible.

+ - US Justice Department Used Fake Cell Towers In Planes To Track Criminals->

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "US Justice Department Used Fake Cell Towers In Planes To Track Criminals
By Tyler Lee on 11/13/2014

There is a lot of concern regarding privacy at the moment, especially in the wake of the Snowden reports which revealed that for the past few years, the government has been spying on its citizens. A recent study also revealed that a vast majority of adults feel like they have no control over their personal information anymore.
Well if all of that bothers you, then this might bother you even more. According to a report from The Wall Street Journal (via MacRumors), it has been revealed that the United States Justice Department has been using fake cell towers installed in airplanes to acquire cellphone data that is used to track criminals. Apparently this is a program that has been in place since 2007 and uses Cessna airplanes (not the commercial plans, thankfully) to operate out of at least five metropolitan area airports.
These planes have been outfitted with a “dirtbox” that is meant to replicate cellular towers, thus tricking cellphones into reporting information to them, which in turn is used to help track individuals who are under investigation. Given that non-criminals’ data can be captured in the process as well, there are some who are questioning the legality of the practice as well as raising concerns about the safeguarding of the information that they have captured in the process."

Link to Original Source

Comment: paste from Reddit... (Score 4, Informative) 132

Got fresh news from the team, they are broadcasting live right now on french TV ! Philae landed, and bounced slowly for 2 hours, and travelled 1km away the targeted site. Yes 1000m. It's now stopped slanted, some cams are shooting the sky, other the ground, and other nearby rocks, as seen on the first photo. It's inside some kind of hole, not much sun for the solar panels. EDIT1: It landed on the core of the comet, it sees the light from the sun for about 1 to 2 hours per day. In the next days/week the angle of the comet will change relative to the sun, and it very likely the solar panel will get more sunlight so more power for the probe. EDIT2 : Many labs are performing right now and performed the whole night. For now they put the drilling on hold since they don't know if it's tied to the ground or not. Drilling op is also power hungry so it's kinda a good thing it's on hold since there's not much sun available for the panels. Battery life been re-estimated to 50-55hours due to the lack of sunlight. This includes the 7 hours of descent.They are constantly adjusting missions goals, depending on conditions, power available, etc, EDIT3 : The probe has been working to gather scientifict data the whole time, including during the bounces. There's already a large amount of data available, whatever happens next.

EDIT4 : It's resting on "hard" ground, with a layer of dust about 30cm, and that's good news because it allows measurements to proceed as planned. As in, it's not burried into soft soil.

EDIT5 : Solar panels are deployed, radio link is up and running, but the fact the probe is slanted/in a hole/random ground limits the time it can communicate with the orbiter, altho that's not jeopardizing the mission. There's already a lot of things transmitted successfully to the orbiter. Contact between the orbiter and the probe can be done twice per day. EDIT6 : The first place it touched the comet was exaclty where it was planned, flat and cosy, too bad it didn't harpoon there. EDIT7 : Next contact will be near 19:30GMT, until 23:45GMT approx. This night they made contact with the probe (from the orbiter) at about 4:00GMT, and at 5:30GMT they had safely recovered all the data from the first batch of tests. From the ESA blog :

The team are ensuring that Rosetta maintains an orbit that is optimised for lander communication support; they are planning a manoeuvre (thruster burn) today to be conducted on Friday that will help keep Rosetta where it should be. Rosetta already conducted a burn last night as part of this effort.

Rosetta is presently sending signals to the ground stations at about 28 Kbps; Ignacio says that the spacecraft's own telemetry downlink uses about 1 or 2 Kbps of this, so the rest is being used to download science data from Rosetta and lander science and telemetry from the surface.

Important press conference from ESA at 13:00GMT. Over now. http://rosetta.esa.int/ EDIT8 : So there was more photos, and details. Important bit, they're planning on righting the lander, studying the best way to do it. First rebound was about 1000m long, 0.38m/s up, lasted 2 hours. 2nd rebound was 0.03m/s, 7 minutes long. Then it stuck itself in the side of the crater at the 3rd impact.

EDIT9 : Harpoons received the signal to fire, but didn't activate. There's no indication of damage on solar panels. The lander can hibernate and may likely still work several monthes from now, even if under limited power. They confirmed the orbiter will make adjustement tomorrow morning (friday) to optimize communication time with the lander. Operations are prioritized, from the less risky to the most.

permalink

"Don't worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you'll have to ram them down people's throats." -- Howard Aiken

Working...