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+ - Robot Arm Will Install New Earth-Facing Cameras On The Space Station->

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Canada’s robotic Canadarm2 will install the next two Urthecast cameras on the International Space Station, removing the need for astronauts to go outside to do the work themselves, the company announced today (Sept. 30).

Urthecast plans to place two Earth-facing cameras on the United States side of the station (on Node 3) to add to the two they already have on the Russian Zvezda module. Technical problems with the cameras forced the Russians to do an extra spacewalk to complete the work earlier this year."

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+ - Code.org: Blame Tech Diversity on Education Pipeline, Not Hiring Discrimination

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes ""The biggest reason for a lack of diversity in tech," writes Code.org's Hadi Partovi in a featured Re/code story, "isn't discrimination in hiring or retention. It’s the education pipeline" (Code.org just disclosed "we have no African Americans or Hispanics on our team of 30"). Supporting his argument, Partovi added: "In 2013, not one female student took the AP computer science exam in Mississippi" (left unsaid is that only one male student took the exam in Mississippi). Microsoft earlier vilified the CS education pipeline in its U.S. Talent Strategy as it sought "targeted, short-term, high-skilled immigration reforms" from lawmakers. And Facebook COO and "Lean In" author Sheryl Sandberg recently suggested the pipeline is to blame for Facebook's lack of keg stand diversity (actual Facebook diversity 'disclosure'). "Girls are at 18% of computer science college majors," Sandberg told USA Today in August. "We can't go much above 18% in our coders [Facebook has 7,185 total employees] if there's only 18% coming into the workplace.""

+ - Denmark Scientists invented a New Material which can suck and release Oxygen ->

Submitted by Brian Conrad
Brian Conrad (3818221) writes "Now you suddenly needed to vacuum all the oxygen from a room which caught fire and all you have to do is to place the "unnamed" material in the room and it will suck all the oxygen. Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have synthesized crystalline materials that can bind and store oxygen in high concentrations. Just one spoon of the substance is enough to absorb all the oxygen in a room. The stored oxygen can be released again when and where it is needed."
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+ - Creepy Guys Inspire Women To Create New Dating App

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Tricia Romano reports at the Seattle Times that Susie Lee and Katrina Hess have developed Siren, a new online dating app designed to protect against men inundating women with messages that are by turns gross, hilarious, objectifying and just plain sad. A 2012 experiment by Jon Millward, a data journalist, found that women were messaged 17 times more than men; the best-looking woman received 536 messages in four months, while the best-looking guy received only 38. Lee hopes to change the nature of the messages and put women in the driver’s seat. As online dating options have grown, Lee noticed that her friends' frustration did, too: With every good introduction often came a slew of lewd ones. "I just started looking (at online dating options) and very quickly realized how many things are out there and how immediately my 'creepy meter' went up," Lee says. The free iPhone app, currently launched to a select market in Seattle in August, allows women to peruse men’s pictures and their answers to the “Question of the Day” (“You found a magic lamp and get three wishes. What are they?”) and view their Video Challenges (“Show us a hidden gem in Seattle”). If a woman is suitably impressed by a man’s answers, she can make herself visible to him. Only then can he see what she looks like. "It’s a far more thoughtful — and cautious — approach than the one taken by the dating app of the moment, Tinder, which is effectively a “hot or not” game, with little information beyond a few photos, age and volunteered biographical tidbits," writes Romano. "And the implicit notion that it’s a “hookup” app can be uncomfortable for some women." Lee and Hess are betting that men are less shallow and want more repartee. And they know that women want a little more flirtation than crude references. After all, Siren’s motto is “Charm Someone’s Pants Off.” “Before the ‘pants off,’ it’s more about charming someone,” says Hess. “Be charming.”"

+ - Whose car is it? Bricked Model S a no go unless Tesla says so.-> 3

Submitted by blagooly
blagooly (897225) writes ""SAN DIEGO — A San Diego man bought a high-end Tesla at auction for nearly half price, but now he can't get the company to activate the car.
He says repairing the car has been easy; dealing with Tesla has been the challenge.
Rutman says he needs a Tesla-certified mechanic to switch on the car's brain so it will accept a charge. But Tesla won't do it unless he signs a liability release form. The form also gives Tesla the final say on whether the car is roadworthy."
Should a manufacturer have the power to shut down your gadget, your car, your refrigerator? For what reason? We have just seen shutdown devices for folk's who miss car payments. Buyer beware."

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+ - Hidden Symmetry Observed for First Time in Solid State Matter

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "An international team of researchers from various institutions have discovered "a nanoscale symmetry hidden in solid state matter". The group experimented with the one-atom-wide magnetic material cobalt niobate, tuning it with an applied magnetic field to turn it quantum critical (i.e., a quantum uncertain state). Using neutron scattering, the researchers observed magnetic resonance with the first two of a series of resonant notes showing frequencies related to each other by the golden ratio (1.618... or, for a>b>0, a/b = (a+b)/a). The golden ratio is usually associated with architecture and art. This study is the first time that a hidden symmetry has been observed in the atomic composition of solid state matter."

+ - Windows 10: Last Hurrah for Microsoft's OS?->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "There’s a reason why Microsoft executives spent the bulk of their Sept. 30 presentation emphasizing Windows 10’s security, app store, and management features—i.e., everything usually glossed over in presentations—and it’s that the new operating system isn’t a revolutionary step forward. If anything, It seems more like an iterative upgrade to Windows 7 than anything else. That could satisfy business customers, who usually aren’t enthused about change, but it’s unlikely to generate much excitement among consumers, many of whom increasingly rely on other operating systems such as Android and iOS. Is Windows 10 a step in the right direction for Microsoft, and a way to fix the ill reception and anemic upgrade rate of Windows 8? Or is Windows' peak years behind it, even if Microsoft seems determined to place it on as many tablets, smartphones, and PCs as possible?"
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+ - Elon Musk: We Must Put a Million Humans On Mars To Safeguard Humanity->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Elon Musk's ambitions for SpaceX keep getting bigger. First he wanted to make the trip to Mars affordable, then he wanted to establish a city-sized colony, and now he's got his eye on the future of humanity. Musk says we need a million people on Mars to form a "sustainable, genetically diverse civilization" that can survive as humanity's insurance policy. He continued, "Even at a million, you’re really assuming an incredible amount of productivity per person, because you would need to recreate the entire industrial base on Mars. You would need to mine and refine all of these different materials, in a much more difficult environment than Earth. There would be no trees growing. There would be no oxygen or nitrogen that are just there. No oil." How fast could we do it? Within a century, once the spacecraft reusability problem is solved. "Excluding organic growth, if you could take 100 people at a time, you would need 10,000 trips to get to a million people. But you would also need a lot of cargo to support those people. In fact, your cargo to person ratio is going to be quite high. It would probably be 10 cargo trips for every human trip, so more like 100,000 trips. And we’re talking 100,000 trips of a giant spaceship.""
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+ - Sophisticated iOS malware targets Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A sophisticated iOS malware named Xsser affecting the operating systems of iPhones and iPads have popped up, targeting Hong Kong protesters. Cyber-security firm Lacoon Mobile Security has said the iOS virus, capable of stealing all the personal details from the Apple devices including contacts, passwords, and photographs, was inadvertently identified during an investigation on Android equipment for spywares.
The firm squarely pointed fingers at the Chinese administration, saying such a cross-platform attack involving both iOS and Android indicates that it is launched by a "very large organisation or nation state"."

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+ - Calling Mr Orwell, rejigged executive order makes collecting data not collecting->

Submitted by sandbagger
sandbagger (654585) writes "'...it is often the case that one can be led astray by relying on the generic or commonly understood definition of a particular word.' Specifically words offering constitutional protections against unreasonable search and seizure. TechDirt looks at the redefinition of the term collection as redefined by Executive Order 12333 to allow basically every information dragnet, provided no-one looks at it. "Collection" is now defined as "collection plus action." According to this document, ot still isn't collected, even if its been gathered, packaged and sent to a "supervisory authority." No collection happens until examination. It's Schroedinger's data, neither collected nor uncollected until the "box" has been opened. This leads to the question of aging off collected data/communications: if certain (non) collections haven't been examined at the end of the 5-year storage limit, are they allowed to be retained simply because they haven't officially been collected yet? Does the timer start when the "box" is opened or when the "box" is filled?"
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+ - Something keeps coming and going in a sea on Titan

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "Cassini images taken in 2007, 2013, and 2014 of one of Titan’s largest hydrocarbon seas find that a mysterious feature there keeps appearing and disappearing.

The mysterious feature, which appears bright in radar images against the dark background of the liquid sea, was first spotted during Cassini’s July 2013 Titan flyby. Previous observations showed no sign of bright features in that part of Ligeia Mare. Scientists were perplexed to find the feature had vanished when they looked again, over several months, with low-resolution radar and Cassini’s infrared imager. This led some team members to suggest it might have been a transient feature. But during Cassini’s flyby on August 21, 2014, the feature was again visible, and its appearance had changed during the 11 months since it was last seen.

Scientists on the radar team are confident that the feature is not an artifact, or flaw, in their data, which would have been one of the simplest explanations. They also do not see evidence that its appearance results from evaporation in the sea, as the overall shoreline of Ligeia Mare has not changed noticeably. The team has suggested the feature could be surface waves, rising bubbles, floating solids, solids suspended just below the surface, or perhaps something more exotic.

That the seasons are slowly changing on Titan is probably contributing to the transient nature of this feature."

+ - Are the world's religions ready for ET?-> 2

Submitted by Science_afficionado
Science_afficionado (932920) writes "At the current rate of discovery, astronomers will have identified more than a million exoplanets by the year 2045. That means, if life is at all common in the Milky Way, astronomers will soon detect it. Realization that the nature of the debate about life on other worlds is about to fundamentally change lead Vanderbilt astronomer David Weintraub to begin thinking seriously about how people will react to such a discovery. He realized that people's reactions will be heavily influenced by their religious beliefs, so he decided to find out what theologians and leaders from the world's major religions have to say about the matter. The result is a book titled "Religions and Extraterrestrial Life" published by Springer this month. http://www.springer.com/social... He discovered that from Baptists to Buddhists, from Catholics to Mormons, from Islam to the Anglican Communion religious views differ widely."
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Somebody ought to cross ball point pens with coat hangers so that the pens will multiply instead of disappear.

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