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Comment: Re:Use the technology on a chromebook (Score 1) 58

by swb (#48269219) Attached to: Google Announces Project Ara Developer Conference, Shows Off First Prototype

I think some of the technology issues involving size, etc. will eventually get fixed. The price may actually end up being less if the value proposition includes using modules in multiple devices, desktops, etc.

The software issue is two-pronged -- one, hardware advances so rapidly right now that I mostly give OEMs a break for bad support of older devices (maybe more nods to Apple, less to Android).

The biggest obstacle for both software and an Ara-like system with modularity is the economics of monolithic device release cycle. OEMs know they can count on a huge amount of sales as entire devices get bought every year.

It's hard to see Apple or Samsung giving up those economics for the economics of incrementalism or even bothering to support incremental component upgrades.

Comment: Re:CP/M needs to buried ... (Score 1) 64

by LWATCDR (#48268503) Attached to: Check Out the Source Code For the Xerox Alto

CP/M was written for hobbyists. PIP was from a time when even floppy disks were uncommon. As far as ease of use CP/M beat the daylight out of toggle switches. The issue is that once CP/M became mainstream it was going to be hard to change the syntax. Kind of like MS-DOS using \ for paths and / for switches.

Comment: This is why (Score 2) 335

by SuperKendall (#48267443) Attached to: Imagining the Future History of Climate Change

Crop yields are expected to decline because plants need more water as the temperature goes up:

We already know from historical records agriculture was better with the climate a few degrees warmer overall - also a warmer climate increases ocean evaporation, leading (as it has) to more rain in many areas.

If you are thinking regionally instead of globally, like say California, that is simply reverting to historical norms after a decade or two of above average precipitation - plus of course really badly managed water rights that hate agriculture.

As for your link, good luck with the magical thinking.

Comment: Why not the Golden Age? (Score 4, Interesting) 335

by SuperKendall (#48266829) Attached to: Imagining the Future History of Climate Change

What gets me is the mild warming we are obviously going to be experiencing (since large CO2 increase have not shown not to correlate to rapid temperature increases as previously thought) is going to bring an overall boon to the planet, just as it did in ages past - a wider range of arable land.

Sure some land will change for the worse, but overall as a species we will be better off - and the rate the climate is changing allows for plenty of time for people, plants and animals to adapt.

Comment: Re:Use the technology on a chromebook (Score 1) 58

by swb (#48266707) Attached to: Google Announces Project Ara Developer Conference, Shows Off First Prototype

There's all kinds of reasons this won't work, but I'm glad someone disagrees and is spending time developing it anyway because it seems like a cool concept and the idea of a modular phone/phablet/tablet/laptop/desktop system is appealing.

I think a lot of components are rapidly approaching the point where they're good enough for most people -- how many more ppi is Joe Sixpack going to want once a phone is over 300 ppi?

Comment: Re:Sanity? (Score 1) 409

by LWATCDR (#48259729) Attached to: Ken Ham's Ark Torpedoed With Charges of Religious Discrimination

You like many people say that but do understand what it means.

A big company wants to build a theme park and gets development money from the state.
A church wants to build a theme park and gets development money from the state.
That is okay because both are treated the same.

If only the church or only the commercial company get money then you have a failure of separation of church and state.

And just so you understand this is the exact wording in the constitution
""Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof ..." and Article VI specifies that "no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States." "
In other words the original intent allowed states to actually have state religions. It only restricted the Federal government and even those restrictions are very limited and DO NOT LIMIT WHAT A CHURCH CAN DO! Some states have also embraced the separation of church and state but all those laws would make it illegal to exclude a church from receiving the same breaks that a non-church entity does from a state.
It is not a law to protect you from religion or to restrict religion. It is a law to protect the church.

Comment: Re:Obvious (Score 3, Insightful) 51

by HuguesT (#48259059) Attached to: Getting Lost In the Scientific Woods Is Good For You

Most people think that scientist are strange people who have amassed a huge amount of very precise facts about an extremely specific field, some of which might be useful (facts or fields), but most of which are useless to the common people. The prototype is the scientist lady in the TV series "Bones". Scientists are assimilated to dorks who have not only not an ounce of creativity in them but also no social skills.

In reality scientists need to be extremely creative in their work, and need to have the humility to accept that they know or understand only a tiny amount of the world that is around us. It is very easy and quick to tread into the complete unknown. We cannot at present even reconcile the most established theories we have about the way the world works (relativity and quantum mechanics).

Comment: Re:The hardest part.. (Score 1) 51

by HuguesT (#48259033) Attached to: Getting Lost In the Scientific Woods Is Good For You

No, that is easy. Most paths in science have never even been tried.

What is hard is to find a path that leads to somewhere. Then just as hard it getting the somewhere you discovered to be accepted by the scientific community. Think plaque tectonics, relativity, quantum mechanics, even something as fundamental as cosmology, and so on.

Faith may be defined briefly as an illogical belief in the occurence of the improbable. - H. L. Mencken

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