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Comment: Re:Its Urban Trees (Score 1) 442

by DerekLyons (#48470565) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

You're the exception that proves it. Most of the region has great uptime, and also lots of trees, urban and rural both.

You're assuming something I didn't say - because I said nothing about uptime at all. (And for good reason, it's irrelevant to the your nonsensical claim that there is no impact from trees, and because it's not an issue... I've only lost power in the heaviest of storms.) The rest of the message is just more of the same - claiming I'm being "pillaged" not based on facts but on assumptions you've pulled out of thin air
 

Heavy rain doesn't impact the lines at all.

Except for when it does of course. If you lived in this area, you'd know it's very hilly and pieces of it do slide and trees do fall over when the ground gets saturated (in many places the topsoil is fairly thin with hardpan relatively close to the surface). Wherever you are isn't the whole of the Northwest, stop assuming that what hold true there holds true here.

Comment: Re:Its Urban Trees (Score 1) 442

by DerekLyons (#48469291) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

All things, right here in the Pacific Northwest, that have caused power outages at my house. And my utility is a public traded company

Really? Which company would that be? The only "investor-owned" electric utility in this region that I'm familiar with failed miserably in the stock market and was taken private years ago to keep them limping along.

My mistake, but that's irrelevant - because they still aren't the public utility you cited.

Comment: Re:Its Urban Trees (Score 1) 442

by DerekLyons (#48467009) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

My advice to communities... have a public utility that isn't controlled by the city or other general-purpose politicians, and elect engineers to the board. It works really well.

That is why in the Pacific Northwest where trees grow faster than any other part of the US, and cities are full of trees, there is reliable power almost everywhere.

Except for when snow causes a tree to sag on the lines. Or a windstorm causes a tree to fall on the lines. Or very heavy rain causes a tree to sag onto the lines.

All things, right here in the Pacific Northwest, that have caused power outages at my house. And my utility is a public traded company, which covers the entire Puget Sound Basin. You may have a perfect idyllic power utility and reliable power that never has problems with trees - but you aren't the whole of the Pacific Northwest.

Comment: Re:Ross Perot is awesome! (Score 1) 118

by operagost (#48466963) Attached to: How the World's First Computer Was Rescued From the Scrap Heap
Did you actually read the article? He didn't ask for the ENIAC, specifically. They could have just grabbed an old IBM, but the guy assigned the project kicked it up a few notches. Parts of it are still unaccounted for, and one panel they recovered was destroyed. The missing panels would have to be recreated from plans-- if they still exist-- and the existing ones would have to be extensively repaired.

Comment: Re:Ross Perot is awesome! (Score 1) 118

by operagost (#48466909) Attached to: How the World's First Computer Was Rescued From the Scrap Heap
I have to agree that if we had a runoff system, people would probably stop complaining about the elector system that they know nothing about. Having a de facto two party system is simply not working. We probably should get rid of physical electors to streamline the process, but the idea of citizens electing their president through the states is a logical, consistent one.

"It's when they say 2 + 2 = 5 that I begin to argue." -- Eric Pepke

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