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Comment: Re:This is about money (Score 1) 53

by Smidge204 (#49568843) Attached to: Feds Say It's Time To Cut Back On Fluoride In Drinking Water

Too much fluoride causes tooth discoloration (fluorosis). It's harmless but unsightly.

But that aside, I wonder what's less expensive: Fluoridation programs, or dental treatment for the extra problems that would arise from stopping fluoridation. That would be an interesting study to thumb through...
=Smidge=

Comment: Re:I love KSP, but sometimes... (Score 3, Informative) 49

by Smidge204 (#49568057) Attached to: Kerbal Space Program 1.0 Released After 4 Years of Development

But, in typical Squad fashion, they gave us the ability to overheat - but failed to give us the ability to cool off.

Parts act as blackbody radiators and will cool off just like any object would.

Solar panels also now act as passive radiators (source) so they now have dual functionality.

They also gave us a more advanced (and accurate) aerodynamics and engine performance model - but at the cost of the game's much vaunted simplicity and user friendliness.

I dare say the new model makes it *easier* to get a rocket or space plane flying. Too easy, actually... my rockets and planes from 0.90 are all way too fast and destroy themselves much faster than they used to. I haven't had time to really dig into the new mechanics but so far it's promising that my 2000+ ton rockets might actually fair better than before!
=Smidge=

Comment: Re:Curse you, Entropy! (Score 1) 430

Thermodynamics

...means nothing with respect to carbon emissions.

In contrast, using the "renewable energy source" directly yields much higher net benefit.

Only for certain values of "benefit."

Liquid fuels are extremely energy-dense, portable and stable. Yes, you might trade total net energy for that benefit, but that's not a deal breaker if the energy is extremely cheap (renewable). You can have battery powered cars (of which I'm a major proponent), even battery powered/hybrid trucks. You're not going to have a battery operated cargo plane any time soon, nor an all-electric cargo ship, and I can't imagine a battery powered rocket.

Then there's transport. You can put liquid fuels on a truck or train car, or on a boat, and transport it anywhere. You can even use a pipe: A 6" pipe carrying diesel fuel can transport as much power as the entire output of a large nuclear power plant (~1.8GW).

The density and portability of liquid fuels is a HUGE benefit and worth paying the energy price for in many circumstances.
=Smidge=

Comment: Re:My summary on systemd (Score 1) 421

by jbolden (#49567475) Attached to: Debian 8 Jessie Released

So far you've been wrong about just about everything. I know you think that prefacing nonsense with insults makes it an argument but it isn't.

Mainframes do precisely what you claim cannot be done and have done since long before Unix. So your categorical assertions of what can and can't be done are simply and obviously provably false. The fact that rather than admit this and engage you continue to be rude proves that you lack character as well as knowledge.

Comment: I love KSP, but sometimes... (Score 3, Insightful) 49

by DerekLyons (#49567211) Attached to: Kerbal Space Program 1.0 Released After 4 Years of Development

"Now, not only temperature but also energy flux is considered when making heat calculations, meaning radiative, conductive, and convective heating and cooling are all simulated and all parts have their individual thermal properties."

But, in typical Squad fashion, they gave us the ability to overheat - but failed to give us the ability to cool off.

They also gave us a more advanced (and accurate) aerodynamics and engine performance model - but at the cost of the game's much vaunted simplicity and user friendliness.

Seriously, I love KSP - but the developers don't always think through the consequences of their design decisions. With the 1.0 update to the aerodynamics and engine performance, I'll no longer be recommending it to friends. The part of the game you spend the least amount of time doing (launching into Kerbin orbit) has now become a wearying slog with a steep learning curve and a roadblock to the fun parts of the game.

Comment: Re:Inflation, slow Internet, skill, slow PC (Score 1) 149

by tepples (#49566547) Attached to: Valve Pulls the Plug On Paid Mods For Skyrim

A much better analogy would be watching other people play board games.

In certain circles, chess and poker have become spectator sports.

Also, we're talking "let's plays" here. There's no "skilled play" involved. It's an idiot with a camera playing a game poorly while making dumb jokes. It's dumb, it's pointless, and it's copyright infringement. Just ask Nintendo.

This is why e-sports won't take off, as the publisher has power to shut down any league competing with the publisher's approved league.

Comment: Inflation, slow Internet, skill, slow PC (Score 5, Insightful) 149

by tepples (#49566435) Attached to: Valve Pulls the Plug On Paid Mods For Skyrim

Now we're getting "day one DLC." What the fuck?

In the Super NES era, games used to cost $60, which is about $90-something in today's money after inflation. Now in the Xbox 360 and Xbox One era, games still cost $60. Day one expansions make the extra $30 of content optional to buy.

Why the hell would anyone per-order a digital game, where there's no chance it'll sell out and they won't be able to get a copy?

Because they can't afford an Internet connection that'll transfer 30 GB in one hour. So instead, they let Steam download the game over the preorder period and then install it on release day.

Why are people sitting around watching OTHER PEOPLE play games that they themselves could be playing?

Lack of skill, lack of strong enough PC, lack of the correct console, game being out of print, etc. Why do people watch football instead of playing football?

Comment: Re:Easy fix (Score 0) 185

by DerekLyons (#49566337) Attached to: The Engineer's Lament -- Prioritizing Car Safety Issues

The thing that the public needs to learn is to trust engineers.

Engineers designed the original SRB field joint for the Space Shuttle. When it had problems during testing, engineers designed the slapdash fix. Then that had problems, engineers decided it was OK to continue to fly while they worked on a fix.

Engineers put seamed pipe into the engine room of Thresher. And wrote the procedures that kept heat in a scrammed reactor rather than allowing it to be extracted to drive the ship in a life-or-death emergency. And designed a high pressure air system without putting a dryer in the system.

Tell me again why I should blindly put my trust in engineers?

Engineers are not angels, they're human. Sometimes they fuck up. Sometimes the fuck up really badly, and people die.

Comment: Re:Easy fix (Score 1) 185

by DerekLyons (#49566317) Attached to: The Engineer's Lament -- Prioritizing Car Safety Issues

I doubt very very much if the final decision was made by an engineer. It was far more likely made by either an accountant or a lawyer.

Why? You've never heard of an engineer estimating costs? Or of being given a cost and told to design to that cost? Brace yourself, because both of these are bog standard parts of engineering.

Engineers are not angels. They're human, and they fuck up too.

Comment: Depends on how you define JavaScript (Score 1) 185

by tepples (#49566159) Attached to: JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

You can't use jQuery without knowing ECMAScript, but you can use it without knowing W3C-standard DOM API. This technically means you can use it without knowing JavaScript, so long as you define JavaScript as the sum of ECMAScript and DOM API. I'm assuming that the so-called guru implicitly defines it as such.

"Consequences, Schmonsequences, as long as I'm rich." -- Looney Tunes, Ali Baba Bunny (1957, Chuck Jones)

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