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Media

Tired of Flash? HTML5 Viewer For YouTube 372

Posted by timothy
from the that-taste-great-together dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Instead of spending the next 10 years trying to find a Flash implementation for Linux or OS X that doesn't drain CPU cycles like there's no tomorrow, NeoSmart Technologies has made an HTML5 viewer for YouTube videos. It loads YouTube videos in an HTML5 video container and streams (with skip/skim/pause/resume) against an MP4 resource, and an (optional) userscript file can update YouTube pages with the HTML5 viewer. The latest versions of Firefox, Chrome, and Safari are supported. Personally, I can't wait until the major video sites default to HTML5 and we can finally say goodbye to Flash."
Hardware Hacking

Reusing Old TiVo Hardware? 197

Posted by Soulskill
from the self-warming-feline-nap-station dept.
buss_error writes "I have old TiVo hardware that I'd like to reuse — however, I find in searching that the most frequent reply is: 'Don't cheat TiVo!' I don't want to cheat TiVo — in fact, I'd like to nuke the drive with a completely open-source distro with no TiVo drivers at all. Some uses I think would be interesting: recording video for security cameras or a drive cam; a unit for weather reporting; fax/telephone; a power monitor for the home; or other home automation. I would prefer a completely TiVo-free install — this is because I have major issues with TiVo and don't want the slightest taint of their intellectual property. But, since I paid for the hardware, I'd like to wring some use out of it rather than simply putting it in the landfill."

Comment: Re:The One Million Nodes Slashdot Story (Score 1) 5

by OldMiner (#30011614) Attached to: Everything2 hits 2 million nodes

There are 342,302 total writeups on E2 that haven't been removed from view which weren't automatically added from the Webster 1913 dictionary. (102,719 entries were "auto-noded" from Webster's and most have been around since E2's inception.) Given that a great many of nodes from before 2000 were deleted in recent years, I'd wager about 300,000 of those writeups have been created since March 2001.

Comment: The One Million Nodes Slashdot Story (Score 1) 5

by OldMiner (#30007688) Attached to: Everything2 hits 2 million nodes
One of E2's little historical items was its hitting 1 million nodes back in March of 2001. Perhaps foreshadowing the move of the site away from "irreverent encyclopedia" and more towards "good writing" can be seen in the comment on that story left by Jimbo Wales, promoting Wikipedia, then with 2000 articles "many of very good quality".
Image

The Thirteen Greatest Error Messages of All Time 623 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the let-them-down-easy dept.
Technologizer writes "They add insult to injury — and computing wouldn't be the same without 'em. So I rounded up a baker's dozen of the most important error messages in computing history — from Does Not Compute to Abort, Retry, Fail to the Sad Mac to the big kahuna of them all — the mighty Blue Screen of Death. And just in case my judgment is off, I include a poll to let the rest of the world vote for the greatest error message of all." I can't believe that "I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that" didn't make the list.
Image

Slashdot's Disagree Mail 188 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the I-want-back-in dept.
Since we covered people who wanted out of Slashdot last week, I thought we'd look at some people who wanted back in. These users found that living without Slashdot was a lot harder than they thought. Maybe you've just been married and are finding out your wife is less interesting than Slashdot or maybe you were bad and want to make amends. These people found out it's hard to make it without your favorite website. Keep reading to find out what they'll do to get back.
Privacy

iPhone Takes Screenshots of Everything You Do 225

Posted by kdawson
from the watchbird-is-watching-you dept.
The_AV8R writes "Jonathan Zdziarski showed that every time you press the Home button on your iPhone, a screen capture is taken in order to produce a visual effect. This image is then cached and later deleted. Zdziarski says that there have been cases of law enforcement looking up sex offenders' old data and checking recovered screenshots." This revelation occurred in the midst of a webcast on iPhone forensics, demonstrating how to bypass the iPhone's password security (not trivial, but doable). Video from the talk is not online yet but is promised soon over at O'Reilly.
Image

Slashdot's Disagree Mail 264 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the keep-your-cool dept.
In this week's Disagree Mail, I try to show the range of messages I get. It's not all angry or insane, sometimes it's sent to us for no apparent reason. We start off a little mad, slip into a whole bunch of crazy and finish with someone who has a complaint about racism at his favorite restaurant. Read below to get started.
The Internet

The Beginnings of a TLD Free-For-All? 489

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the bad-ideas dept.
Mordok-DestroyerOfWo writes "According to the BBC, ICANN is considering opening up the wholesale creation of TLDs by private industry. While I'm sure this is done for the convenience of the companies and has nothing to do with the several thousand dollars they will be charging for each registration, I was curious what the tech community at large thought about this idea. It seems to me that this will simply open the doors for a never-ending stream of TLD squatters."
Programming

The Principles of Project Management 125

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-all-about-it dept.
zedguy writes "Ask someone what 'project management' is and you're liable to get a few blank stares — it's one of those fields people have heard of, but probably have problems pinning down a definition. So that is what the first section of the book does: provides a definition that can be summed up as applying tools and skills to complete a project. That then leads to what exactly is a "project": a set of tasks with a time-frame and goal of somehow adding value. So yes, the introduction does involve a fair bit of terminology that isn't going to be familiar to many readers coming from a coder's background, but there's a helpful appendix that lays out many of the terms. Just as important, the introduction explains what project management is not, some of the misconceptions and why it's good to know." Keep reading for the rest of Zoltan's review.
Communications

Lycos Deletes Emails and Says 'Too Bad!' 513

Posted by Zonk
from the now-that's-customer-service dept.
Billosaur writes "The Consumerist brings us a tale of woe which is apparently generating outrage in some quarters, along with death threats. Lycos email customer Whitney did not access her account for 30 days. This resulted in Lycos deleting over two years worth of email. It isn't so much Lycos' policy that's the problem (though that requires some scrutiny), but the response of the 'manager of all of Customer Service,' Mike Jandreau. Apparently he's not too service oriented, as his exchange with Whitney shows. And since this story was posted to The Consumerist, apparently Mr. Jandreau has become the focus of some unwanted attention. Of course, his final response to her might have something to with it: 'I'm sorry, no one here has any intentions of helping you with anything. I am the manager of all of Customer Service. There is no one higher than me that you will speak with. You violated our policy, which is, despite what you say, completely clear. No one is holding anything hostage. Your e-mails have been completely deleted, and no amount of money can now restore them.'"
Education

What Micro-Controller Would You Use to Teach With? 175

Posted by Cliff
from the technology-in-a-school-environment dept.
Rukie asks: "I'm looking into starting some sort of robotics class for my high school, which severely lacks any sort of technological classes. I am now wondering what micro-controllers are best for an educational environment. I definitely want something more advanced than the Legos, but something that won't fly over people's heads. Are there cheap, scaleable micro-controllers for learning in a classroom or at home? I'm curious how my fellow readers have hacked up toys to make their own robotics at minimal cost."

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