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Comment: Extreme views on all sides. (Score 1) 214

Congratulations, fellow Slashdotters, for (predictably?) hewing to the opposite end of the spectrum from the people in the articles.

If their side says, "Hawaiian culture and spirituality is of paramount importance, your science has no place on our sacred mountain," calling them extreme and then saying that science is of paramount importance and their culture and spirituality should be given no weight whatsoever... doesn't make you look like the good guys. In fact, it only gives them more evidence that supporters of science are every bit as extreme and closed-minded.

I work full-time at a big telescope on Maunakea, and have a further part-time job using one of the smaller telescopes on Maunakea, as well as other jobs outside astronomy. I go to Maunakea in person, and interact with TMT's opponents in person. The situation is a lot more nuanced to me than a bunch of Internet Tough Guys could hope to begin to understand, but I just wanted to let you know that no, you're actually not helping.

Comment: Re:I WISH he was a candidate (Score 1) 235

by squiggleslash (#49603597) Attached to: Bernie Sanders, Presidential Candidate and H-1B Skeptic

Registered Democrats in many areas of Florida in 2000 (and to a certain extent today) are Dixiecrats, not people to the left of the editorial columns in the Washington Post. They tend to vote Republican for everything except local politics. They may vote for a Democratic Senator, Congressman, or State Governor, but only if the candidate is a Dixiecrat too.

Comment: I found it works on Slashdot (Score 4, Funny) 29

by squiggleslash (#49602121) Attached to: Researcher Bypasses Google Password Alert For Second Time

Surprisingly, with Chrome, if you enter your Google password in the Subject box of a new comment and then press the "Submit" button, the warning dialog comes up and your post won't get sent until you confirm it. Only discovered that because my Google password is (well, was) "systemd?".

Comment: Re:Motive (Score 2) 143

Yeah I thought the summary's equation of "Protestors" and "Rioters" (headline uses the latter, main text the former, apparently referring to the same people - for the record, the number of protestors in Baltimore last week was some figure conservatively estimated in the tens of thousands; the number of rioters was less than 2,000 - probably much less, being made up largely of local gangs) was rather reflective of the kneejerk reaction against any politicial activity by "the masses" in this country.

The other day I mentioned the (thankfully debunked) neo-urban-legend about a nearby Florida sheriff saying it was OK to run over protestors if they get in your way to some people in the office. At least one was fully in favor, giving a whoop when he heard it.

I was brought up in the UK, moving to the US when I was 25. The idea of treating political protests as something horrific astounds me, it's normal activity over there, you'd expect it to be accepted and supported in the country that invented the first amendment. But apparently not.

Comment: Re:Leaping to assumptions (Score 1) 81

Psychologists who collaborate with torturers are ethically complicit

Absolutely, which is obviously something you and I agree upon completely.

Boycotting the torturers is the only ethical stance here

If it is (and it isn't) then ethics be damned. The only moral stance is to do whatever is in your power to prevent torture from happening. Standing idly and refusing to intervene by is utterly reprehensible, even if it's an ethical one according to some code of ethics I'm unfamiliar with.

Comment: Re:systemd? (Score 1) 48

by squiggleslash (#49599767) Attached to: Debian GNU/Hurd 2015 Released

Well in fairness some modern operating system components that ship with Debian, such as recent GNOMEs, are transitioning (or have transitioned) to having systemd as a dependency. Yeah, you can "just not use GNOME", but over time more and more of the operating system will transition that way.

And it kinda ignores why systemd exists. Over time, I'd expect Debian to make itself more systemd dependent, as doing so allows Debian to introduce long awaited security and stability improvements by allowing it to transparently use cgroups and run unprivileged daemons that can listen to privileged ports, things that are not practical under sysvinit (though might be under Upstart.)

What I'd like to see is Hurd to introduce the functionality that systemd is reliant upon so it too can be ported.

Comment: Re:this is science, so you have to ask... (Score 1) 271

Then if that were her reason, she'd be wrong.

The science is what the reviewer is supposed to review. Truth is that if it had happened the other way, this thread would consist entirely of people yelling "It's PC gone mad/SJWs suck/Feminists want to take away our computer games!"

For some reason, however, when a woman is shat upon for being a woman everyone's so eager to try to find excuses for the jerk who did it. I'm not seeing this as a positive trend.

Comment: Re:They forgot the best feature.... (Score 3, Insightful) 79

by QuietLagoon (#49596257) Attached to: OpenBSD 5.7 Released

BSD is a major commodity ecosystem for end-consumer products. I'd wager that there are more MacBooks and iPods out there running OSX and iOS flavors of BSD than there are Linux ones. They just suck in the server space, though, and that's where Linux cannot at the moment be questioned, let alone defeated.

My FreeBSD servers run just fine, thank-you. I moved those servers from Linux to FreeBSD a number of years ago, and never had the need to look back.

Comment: Leaping to assumptions (Score 3, Insightful) 81

I know nothing about the relationship between the APA and the CIA/FBI/TSA/NSA/GOP here, so it may all be terrible. But: there are reasons to cooperate with a body that might misuse your work that do not involve encouraging them to misuse it. One example might be if the advise offered was on how to get answers out of someone without torturing them.

One community that would, presumably, be very good at the whole knowing how to "Get information out of people without torturing them" would be psychologists (well, at least 43% of the time ;-)).

Yes, I may be wrong here. But the truth is I'd rather wait until this report is published, than leap to assumptions.

Comment: Re:Also, stop supporting sites with poor encryptio (Score 1) 307

by Just Some Guy (#49594697) Attached to: Mozilla Begins To Move Towards HTTPS-Only Web

You should find another bank.

Yep. There are plenty of banks to choose from that - whatever their other flaws - at least take security seriously. If your bank can't or won't lock down their website, then you already know that they're negligent in at least one area. What else are they neglecting?

Comment: Re:Wait a minute... (Score 1) 307

by Just Some Guy (#49594671) Attached to: Mozilla Begins To Move Towards HTTPS-Only Web

I don't think it's extreme at all. I think we're past the point that's it's socially reasonable or responsible not to encrypt all traffic by default.

Even if you're 100% OK with visitors to your site being snooped on, consider that adding to the amount of crypto in use worldwide makes it hard for repressive governments to tell what their citizens are doing online. Maybe your site would be the straw that broke the Great Firewall's back and lets some kid read uncensored news.

"When the going gets tough, the tough get empirical." -- Jon Carroll

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