Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:It all depends on the workload... (Score 1) 120

by slinches (#49517009) Attached to: New PCIe SSDs Load Games, Apps As Fast As Old SATA Drives

Yeah, I meant specifically PCIe mass storage support in consumer grade BIOS and OSs. If you know what you're doing (and have a MB that doesn't lock out most of chip set features), it isn't terribly difficult to set up. It's just that it's nowhere near as brain dead simple as a booting from a standard SATA drive.

Comment: Re:Help me out here a little... (Score 1) 498

by shutdown -p now (#49516461) Attached to: Utilities Battle Homeowners Over Solar Power

I actually wonder if anyone needs to be paid to handle this stuff. It's a useful service, and hence potentially profitable - why wouldn't the market deal with it? Once we start getting substantial excesses of power from residential solar, the energy companies would be seeking for places to dump it, and one can offer such a thing, for a fee. And then sell that power back to the company when they need it (peak of consumption) at a slightly higher rate. So long as this roundtrip is cheaper than the cheapest generated power, the energy companies would participate.

Comment: Re:Help me out here a little... (Score 1) 498

by shutdown -p now (#49516445) Attached to: Utilities Battle Homeowners Over Solar Power

As the amount of electricity you draw from their generators goes down, they're going to reach the point of needing to charge you a flat fee just for the connection to the power lines, plus the usual fees for actually using their electricity.

Natural gas is already paid separately for the connection and for the gas itself, so adopting such a model wouldn't be breaking any new ground.

Comment: Re:It all depends on the workload... (Score 2) 120

by slinches (#49515447) Attached to: New PCIe SSDs Load Games, Apps As Fast As Old SATA Drives

Booting from PCIe is not well supported at this point and that may be interfering with the boot times. As for the game loading benchmark results, these drives are usually used for high speed working file space in servers/workstations (e.g. latency critical databases, video editing, scientific computing). If you aren't trying to solve an I/O bottleneck problem for a specific application, PCIe SSDs probably aren't what you're looking for. And even if you are, you have to know exactly what type of I/O is critical for your application because the different models target different needs (various combinations of IOPS, sequential speeds, read/write balance, write endurance).

Comment: Re:Well done! (Score 1) 476

I missed the part where you explained why Mexican citizens are entitled to emigrate here. See...they're not.

Sure. And a starving guy who can't find a job is not entitled to the contents of your wallet if he finds it on the street, but you'd have to be a sociopath or a retard to actually blame him for not returning it to you, even if that's a "right thing" to do. Or claiming that he's somehow a bad guy if he doesn't.

Shipping Mexican citizens into the US won't fix the problems in Mexico.

Those Mexican citizens aren't trying to solve the problems of Mexico as a whole. They're trying to solve the problems that they have as individuals.

And, of course, no-one asked them if they want to be citizens of Mexico when they were born, so Mexico is not entitled to having them solve its problems, either.

They have sovereignty

They don't have sovereignty, the Mexican state does. To what extent it actually represents the citizens in general, and these citizens in particular, is a question that you should ask before pursuing this line of argument any further.

Comment: Re:Well done! (Score 1) 476

I missed the part where you explained why Mexican citizens are entitled to emigrate here. See...they're not.

Shipping Mexican citizens into the US won't fix the problems in Mexico.

Those Mexican citizens aren't trying to solve the problems of Mexico as a whole. They're trying to solve the problems that they have as individuals.

And, of course, no-one asked them if they want to be citizens of Mexico when they were born, so Mexico is not entitled to having them solve its problems, either.

They have sovereignty

They don't have sovereignty, the Mexican state does. To what extent it actually represents the citizens in general, and these citizens in particular, is a question that you should ask before pursuing this line of argument any further.

Comment: Re:Well done! (Score 1) 476

None of that negates the fact that there is a legal way to immigrate.

Saying that green card lottery is a viable way to legally immigrate is like saying that gambling is a viable way to legally earn money for a living. It's true in a very pedantic way, but practically meaningless.

And you seem to be saying that it is okay to break the law if you don't like it, and the government should simply understand and ignore you breaking the law.

I'm not saying anything of a kind. In fact, I didn't say a single word about what government should or shouldn't do, only about your attitude towards people who break that particular law. I don't know about you, but I know dozens of people who break the law - most of them smoke weed. I don't see why it should affect my opinion of them in any way, since it's obviously a bad and stupid law that I don't have to respect.

Comment: Re:Well done! (Score 2) 476

I am an H1B as well, so I can relate. But ...

Let me make this clear: you are being abused (the terms of H1 visas are effectively abusive for would-be immigrants due to the way they tie you to a specific employer with a very complicated switching process, and reset your green card application if you switch while it's still ongoing), and so you don't like it when other people - who don't get even the abusive option that you do - dodge that?

(And of course being in US as an illegal immigrant is still a very subpar experience to being legal ... hell, just try opening a bank account that way!)

The point is, people tout the illegal status of an immigrant as some kind of huge moral character flaw or failure, sufficient in and of itself to treat them as scum. I'm merely point out that it's not true in general, and specifically depends on how easy it is to immigrate legally for the same person, and how strong are the reasons that prompt them to immigrate. As I'm sure you know full well from your own experience, it's not a light decision to take in the first place, and US immigration system in particular is a mess of gigantic proportions with no coherent immigration policy whatsoever - just a confusing mish-mash of random decisions made over the last few decades.

Comment: Re:Well done! (Score 1) 476

There is always a legal way, it just isn't as quick as the illegal kind.

Can you give an example of an immigration track for an average Mexican, then? What visa he should apply for first etc.

The only thing I can think of is the green card lottery. But it is just that, a lottery, it's not something you can actually rely on to get you there, no matter how long you wait.

Comment: Re:Well done! (Score 3, Insightful) 476

They are a pleasant family, don't complain about stuff people do on their own property, are good to have a beer with, and the father shares a hobby with me even if I don't care for Fords. They are here legally and the father and mother goes to work, and their kids don't throw wild parties that result in my mailbox being run over with a mess of trash in my yard.

Suppose that everything was true, except that they were there illegally (because there is no way for them to immigrate legally, which is the case for most Mexicans). Would your opinion of them change?

Comment: Re:Wow what a problem (Score 1) 555

Also, he should read a correct translation. The commandment is 'do not murder,' not 'do not kill.' The Bible is perfectly clear that there's a time and a place for killing. Both Testaments are pretty clear on that.

Lets not forget, Christianity is, above all, an apocalyptic religion.

To spot the expert, pick the one who predicts the job will take the longest and cost the most.

Working...