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Comment: Re:TFA is a big bullshit ! (Score 2) 32

by LynnwoodRooster (#48672741) Attached to: Inside China's 'Christmas Factory' Town, Yiwu
Note that $500 is about 300 pounds - right in line with the story. And smaller cities in Zhejiang typically are 20-30% less than the Shanghai area. I know in Suzhou my factories tend to pay around 2500 RMB for a 1-2 year experienced worker, with performance bonuses adding up to 1000 RMB on top of that.

Comment: Re:TFA is a big bullshit ! (Score 3, Informative) 32

by LynnwoodRooster (#48672733) Attached to: Inside China's 'Christmas Factory' Town, Yiwu

I am from China, although I am an American now, I do run businesses and some of them are in China

When I read the " ... for a maximum of £200 to £300 a month" I know that TFA is a big bullshit !

Really? I think you don't know China, nor do you do any business there. Zhejiang has the highest minimum wage, and it peaks in Ningbo at 1550 RMB per month (this information is out of date a bit, but pretty close to current conditions). That's 160 pounds sterling. Given that only inexperienced/brand new workers will earn minimum wage, the range of 200 to 300 pounds sterling is completely understandable and expected (that's about 2000 to 3000 RMB per month).

Additionally, new sales staff/office trainees in places like Shanghai run about 3500 RMB per month (low-level white collar) and a fresh acoustical engineering grad from the University of Nanjing (top Chinese school) in the top 10% of his class earns 4500 RMB (about 450 pounds sterling) per month. A very experienced (8 year) office manager with excellent English skills and 5 years experience working for Western companies earns 8000 RMB per month. How do I know? I just returned 4 days ago from Shanghai, where I signed contracts for all those positions.

Factory workers in China in the East rarely start at more than minimum wage. 1500 to 2000 RMB is a very good starting wage, and line bosses/leads may earn double that amount. Well below your 5000 RMB per month minimum salary.

Comment: Re:What do you expect from STANford (Score 1) 217

by LynnwoodRooster (#48665407) Attached to: Tech's Gender Gap Started At Stanford

Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Kurdistan, Istanbul...

Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Now it's Turkish delight on a moonlit night

Every gal in Constantinople
Lives in Istanbul, not Constantinople
So if you've a date in Constantinople
She'll be waiting in Istanbul

Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed it I can't say
People just liked it better that way

So take me back to Constantinople
No, you can't go back to Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works?
That's nobody's business but the Turks

Istanbul, Istanbul
Istanbul, Istanbul

Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed it I can't say
People just liked it better that way

Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works?
That's nobody's business but the Turks

So take me back to Constantinople
No, you can't go back to Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works?
That's nobody's business but the Turks

Istanbul

Best version - Craig Ferguson!

Comment: Re:and they make big bonfires, too (Score 2) 248

by LynnwoodRooster (#48653363) Attached to: The Magic of Pallets

Not always. Going to a 1018 grade steel (0.18%) essentially renders the steel non-magnetic (you lose about 97% of the permeability of decent magnetic steel). Not stainless (still low enough carbon to rust easily), but very weak in terms of magnetism. I design and build audio transducers for a living, and work with various grades of magnetic (and non-magnetic) steel daily. Getting much above 0.15% carbon content or annealing the steel, and you lose a lot of the magnetic properties (permeability goes to pot) that allow for easy harvesting.

Using a magnet to sift out your nails is not a surefire approach to keeping them off of beaches.

Comment: Re:Established science CANNOT BE QUESTIONED! (Score 1) 718

Agreed, and this is what happens. Anyone who tries to publish a paper can tell you how much fun it is, even for papers that follow the current thinking in a particular field. I work with a couple scientists that published a paper in regards to climate change, and it took two years of sometimes colorfully worded review comments and re-submissions before it as accepted.

Other times, complete gibberish is accepted into a journal. Getting published is by no means a guarantee of the quality of the work; all it indicates is that the work fits within the world-view of the publisher. The quality of the work depends upon the data and the methods/algorithms used, and the transparency of both. When data or the process is hidden (or both, as the case with much of the early AGW work), then the quality should immediately be suspect.

Comment: Re:It's required (Score 1) 170

Actually, CALEA means that it's basically illegal to deliver a full end-to-end encrypted system that does not have a back door. Now, if Verizon simply passed encrypted data between endpoints, and let a 3rd party app developer create the endpoints which encrypted/decrypted the data, then Verizon could not offer a backdoor - it has no way of intercepting/decrypting the data. But by doing the full chain (encrypt, transport, decrypt) it simply has to offer a back-door per CALEA because it is obviously possible for them to do so (they see the raw data prior to encryption, and know the encryption scheme and keys - they did the endpoints).

Comment: Re:It's required (Score 1) 170

False.

CALEA only requires the backdoor to exist if it's technically possible. TFA is pretty clear that other manufacturers and carriers have chosen to implement end-to-end encryption that doesn't have the ability to be backdoored, and as such, there's no need to provide the (non-existent) backdoor to the feds.

Can you design a system you would solely supply for encrypted end-to-end communications that could NOT have a backdoor implemented? If you implement the end-points, then a back-door is automatically possible - you control the encryption/decryption on the ends.

Comment: It's required (Score 2, Informative) 170

See the CALEA Act passed in 1994. Telecom providers HAVE to provide that backdoor. If not - they are subject to fines of up to $10,000 per day per connection not in compliance, and having their network shut down until it comes into compliance.

Your indignation should not be directed at Verizon - it should be directed at Washington, DC.

Comment: Re:Why don't they ever try to "link" good stuff? (Score 0) 222

by LynnwoodRooster (#48607713) Attached to: Linking Drought and Climate Change: Difficult To Do
Please try reading the article with the graph. Dr. Easterbrook gives a pretty convincing argument of why this type of graph (ice cores) tend to be more accurate than the mish-mash of multiple proxies all packaged together. The former gives you higher resolution, the latter tends to average over long, multi-century periods (eliminating known events like the Minoan, Roman, and Medieval Warm Periods).

Comment: Re:Why don't they ever try to "link" good stuff? (Score 0) 222

by LynnwoodRooster (#48607377) Attached to: Linking Drought and Climate Change: Difficult To Do
Well, it seems over the last 11,000 years we've had considerably warmer periods - and our species survived and even flourished! The Minoan warm period, the Roman warm period, the Medieval warm period - all were good for worldwide cultures. We're not "headed" anywhere our species hasn't been, and our species has done pretty darn well when it's warmer as opposed to when it's colder.

Comment: Re:The drought is bullshit (Score 1) 222

by LynnwoodRooster (#48607339) Attached to: Linking Drought and Climate Change: Difficult To Do
We in California have all the water we could ever want. We just do not have the political willpower to access it. It's called the Pacific Ocean, and the process is desalination. Which, if it cost us as much as it does Israel, Saudi Arabia, and other desert nations to run, would result in LOWER water costs that what we pay in Southern California (I live in Ventura). Plenty of water - just no willingness to create the necessary desalination plants - and accompanying power plants - to make the water desired.

Sigmund Freud is alleged to have said that in the last analysis the entire field of psychology may reduce to biological electrochemistry.

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