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User Journal

Journal SPAM: We Could be Heroes, Just for One Day 1 1

David Gergen on Fox "news" with Greta Van Susteren: "Well, it was a stunning backdrop. I don't -- you know, Greta, I've watched the choreography of presidential events for a long time and participated in a few. I can't remember an event as spectacular, as stunning as this, as impressive as this, since Richard Nixon returned from China 30 years ago."

The Internet

Submission + - New Jersey Denies Internet from Sex Offenders-> 3 3

eldavojohn writes: "New Jersey just passed legislation making it illegal for sex offenders to use the internet. NJ congresswoman Linda D. Greenstein said, "When Megan's Law was enacted, few could envision a day when a sex offender hiding behind a fake screen name would be a mouse-click away from new and unwitting victims. Sex offenders cannot be given an opportunity to abuse the anonymity the Internet can provide as a means of opening a door to countless new potential victims." While they still can search for jobs, this is a major expansion over the prior legislation which barred them from social networking sites like facebook or myspace."
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Networking

Submission + - Obama backs Network Neutrality->

An anonymous reader writes: Barack Obama, in a speech at Google (youtube link), said that he would "take a back seat to no one" in his support of network neutrality, and said he intends to double Federal funding for science and to make the R&D tax credit permanent. Could Obama be the first mainstream candidate to start understanding geek issues?
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Democrats

Submission + - Clinton Promises Vote Against Gamers->

thefickler writes: "Hilary Clinton was the spearhead behind the ill-fated Family Entertainment Protection Act in 2005. In spite of the failure of that unnecessary and frivolous bill, Clinton is still staunchly in the corner of censorship, this time targeting gamers and fans of anime and other animation and cartoon formats."
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Privacy

Submission + - Sonic advertising - like it or not-> 1 1

newtley writes: "Advertisers are determined to get into your head by one means or another, and Holosonic Research Labs has found yet another way of invading your privacy in the name of forcing you pay attention. You're walking down a street in New York when all of a sudden, 'Who's that?' — whispers a woman's voice. 'Who's There?' No. You weren't having a schizoid episode. You were being subjected to 'sound in a narrow beam, just like light' without your permission. It was coming at you from a rooftop speaker 7 stories up. Don't want to be bombarded by sonic ads? Tough. Wear ear-plugs."
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Biotech

Submission + - Brain grown in jar pilots F-22 sim-> 5 5

NJ Hewitt writes: "Florida scientists have grown a brain in a petri dish and taught it to pilot an F-22 jet simulator." The brain, with neurons connected to 60 electrodes, at first had no ability to pilot the fighter jet, but slowly learned and can now reliably navigate through even hurricane-force winds in the simulator.
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Supercomputing

Submission + - Iran builds supercomputer from banned AMD parts 2 2

Stony Stevenson writes: Iranian scientists claim to have used 216 microprocessors made by AMD to build the country's most powerful supercomputer, despite a ban on the export of U.S. computer equipment to the Middle Eastern nation. Scientists at the Iranian High Performance Computing Research Center at the country's Amirkabir University of Technology said they used a Linux-cluster architecture in building the system of Opteron processors. The supercomputer has a theoretical peak performance of 860 giga-flops, the posting said. The disclosure, made in an undated posting on Amirkabir's Web site, brought an immediate response Monday from AMD, which said it has never authorized shipments of products either directly or indirectly to Iran or any other embargoed country.
Government

Submission + - Icelandian calls White House, labelled a terrorist-> 3 3

An anonymous reader writes: A 16-year-old boy in Iceland called a secret government phone number, which he thought was Bush's private number, and posed as the president of Iceland. After passing some impromptu security questions, such as President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson's birth date (which he answered with Wikipedia), Bush's secretary told him to expect a call back. Instead, police surrounded his house and interrogated him on where he got the number, threatening to put him on a no-fly list if he didn't tell. He claims he can't remember where he got the number, but says "I must have gotten it from a friend when I was about 11 or 12."
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Mars

Submission + - How To Beat Congress's Ban Of Humans On Mars 2 2

An anonymous reader writes: Earlier this year, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would ban humans on Mars at NASA: "Provided, That none of the funds under this heading shall be used for any research, development, or demonstration activities related exclusively to the human exploration of Mars." The bill is held up in Congress and the anti-Mars language may be taken out. But in case the Mars ban becomes law, the Space Review has a handy guide on how NASA can beat the ban and continue its research and development without breaking the law.
Security

Submission + - Penn student at center of worldwide hacking invest->

An anonymous reader writes: When a suspicious computer server crash at the University of Pennsylvania last year denied service to 4,000 students, faculty and staff, technicians called the FBI — triggering a case that would take agents around the world and lead to the arrest of a brilliant but brash Penn junior. Ryan Goldstein, a 20-year-old bioengineering major, conspired with a New Zealand hacker known as AKILL to use Penn's computer system as a staging ground for a 50,000-computer attack against several online chat networks, authorities said. The FBI and Secret Service are expected to announce indictments today against Goldstein, a Florida man, and three others. Police recently executed related raids in New Zealand, Florida, California and Pennsylvania. The latest came Tuesday near Philadelphia. An FBI agent from the region is in New Zealand this week, and more arrests are possible. "We've been executing search warrants all over the world in this case," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael Levy. View article for more.
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OS X

Submission + - Apple fails to deal with change to NZ DST

NTDaley writes: Debian may not have pushed their update for the NZ daylight savings change, but Apple has failed to deal with it at all. Their website instructs users to change the time manually, which is obviously inadequate for people who have to administer a large group of computers, or who need to have accurate times for other timezones. Fortunately a third party has created a fix for the problem.
Biotech

Submission + - Bringing Patients Back from the Dead-> 1 1

FattyBoeBatty writes: Interesting article claiming that patients generally don't die from lack of oxygen — but from the rapid reintroduction of it. Cells without oxygen can conceivably live for upwards of an hour without any damage. While this idea is already proving successful in small ER trials, this may change the way emergency medicine is delivered around the world.
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Toys

Submission + - Preorders open for 230MPG car-> 4 4

m4ximusprim3 writes: Aptera Automotive, maker of the Aptera 230mpg diesel hybrid is now taking $500 "pre orders" for the car, which is scheduled to go into production in 12 months.

The Vehicle seats two people side by side, gets 230mpg at 55mph, has a trunk large enough for a surfboard, and goes from 0-60 in less than 10 seconds.

And, it looks like a fish!

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Privacy

Submission + - Canada Firm, Warrants for Access IP Data

arthurpaliden writes: "Public Safety Minister Stockwell Day said the [Canadian]government would not introduce legislation forcing internet service providers to give customer information without a warrant. "We have not and we will not be proposing legislation to grant police the power to get information from internet companies without a warrant. That's never been a proposal,""

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