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Comment: Re: DirectX is obsolete (Score 1) 88

by TheRaven64 (#48902995) Attached to: DirectX 12 Lies Dormant Within Microsoft's Recent Windows 10 Update
Actually, a lot of these games just use WINE's implementation of DirectX. This either translates the calls to OpenGL or implements a DirectX state tracker directly if you have Gallium drivers configured correctly. The same is true of a lot of Mac games. Good luck getting WINE to run on a console though...

Comment: Re:DirectX is obsolete (Score 1) 88

by TheRaven64 (#48902991) Attached to: DirectX 12 Lies Dormant Within Microsoft's Recent Windows 10 Update

Your typical GPU driver is about 10MB of object code. It contains a complex optimising compiler and controls a device that has complete DMA access to your computer. It is written with speed as the only significant goal. Making a GPU driver 1% faster contributes enough to sales to pay the salaries of several driver developers. Making the GPU driver more secure generates zero additional sales.

The shader code that's fed into this stack from WebGL is sanitised and is completely safe to run, assuming that your driver stack is 100% bug free. Still feel safe?

Comment: Re:DirectX is obsolete (Score 1) 88

by TheRaven64 (#48902983) Attached to: DirectX 12 Lies Dormant Within Microsoft's Recent Windows 10 Update

If you write a game that uses Direct3D, you can easily target Windows, XBox, and Windows Phone. If you write a game that uses OpenGL, then you can easily target all of the major desktop, mobile, and console platforms. If your game runs on a generation-old console, then it will run on current-generation mobiles as well. This gives you three markets: First release for high-end PCs, second for consoles, third for mobiles. You can get a solid revenue stream out of each one. You don't lose the Windows marked by choosing OpenGL, but you do lose every other market by using Direct3D.

That said, the APIs are so similar these days that you'll typically use some middleware to provide the abstraction. All of the important code is written in the shaders and these are much easier to port between GLSL and HLSL than they are to port between different GPUs and maintain performance.

Comment: Re:Modula-3 FTW! (Score 1) 310

by TheRaven64 (#48902963) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is Pascal Underrated?

Implementing this in the standard library means that the language needs to support pass-by-reference (which Pascal and C++ do, but C doesn't). This single feature does a lot to reduce readability. In C, I know that inc(x) is a function that does not modify the value of x, without reading any additional code[1]. In Pascal or C++, I need to look at the definition of inc() to know if x will be the same before and after the call.

An important idea at the core of readability for a language is the amount of code that I have to read to understand a single line. In any language that has pass-by-reference, this amount is larger than a language that doesn't. To achieve the same thing in C, I'd have to write inc(&x), and then everyone reading that code would know that x may be modified. (Note: the almost-equivalence of array and pointer types in C is a good counterexample where Pascal wins massively in readability).

[1] It could be a macro, but most coding conventions require macros that can't be used as if they were functions to be all-caps.

Comment: Re:Modula-3 FTW! (Score 1) 310

by TheRaven64 (#48902951) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is Pascal Underrated?
This would be true, except for two things:
  • Lines with more than 66 non-whitespace characters decrease readability.
  • Statements with more than 66 non-whitespace characters are common in most programming languages.

This means that you end up either with lots of continued statements or lots of overly-long lines in Python. If you have the former, then it's hard to see the indentation. If you have the latter, then you can see the indentation but the overall readability suffers. This can be fixed by using tabs for semantic indentation and spaces for alignment and an editor that supports highlighting tabs, but the Python style guides tell you not to do this.

Comment: Re:Modula-3 FTW! (Score 1) 310

by TheRaven64 (#48902941) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is Pascal Underrated?

There are some simple things where C is far more readable to a moderately experienced programmer. Consider the beginning and ending of blocks. In pascal, these are signified by begin and end. When you look at a chunk of Pascal code, they can be hard to pick out because they're just words in a sea of words. In C, you use the { and } symbols. These are symmetrical and the human brain has spent a lot of time evolving to be trivially able to spot symmetry because symmetry normally means 'predator about to try to eat me'. You can very quickly spot a column that has a { at the top and a } somewhere later (much more easily if they're aligned together and there's nothing else on the line). There were some studies done in the '80s that confirmed this, though sadly a lot of C coding conventions specify brace placement in a way that reduces readability.

The main strength of Pascal is that it forces you to think more than C. If you don't write what you mean in Pascal, it usually fails to compile. C will happily do... something. This level of redundant verbosity makes Pascal both quite a frustrating language for experienced developers and a great language for teaching. I find that people who learned Pascal tend to write better C code than those that didn't, but neither group has a strong desire to write Pascal.

Comment: Re: CA requires commercial licenses for pickup tr (Score 1) 176

Must be a new thing then. Been a few years(like 10-15), but I owned a number of pick up trucks in california, including buying from dealers who took care of all paperwork to make sure it is proper and never needed any commercial plates or registration. My understanding is that it needed to hit 10k GVW before any of that comes into play. (F150 is like 6 or 7)

Comment: Texas economy not reliant on oil industry (Score 1) 56

by SuperKendall (#48902535) Attached to: Ed Felten: California Must Lead On Cybersecurity

In the past the oil industry was a much bigger part of the Texas economy than it is now. It's still a large part, but there is a ton of high-tech stuff all around Texas - Apple is building all of its Mac Pro units in Texas, for example...

They also have a lot of international trade, including a major airport and shipping port too. All of that adds to economic diversity.

Comment: Outside auditors for CA government? Ha! (Score 2) 56

by SuperKendall (#48901569) Attached to: Ed Felten: California Must Lead On Cybersecurity

What they propose is not going to happen simply because of this:

He calls for the state government to protect critical infrastructure and sensitive data, relying on outside auditors and experts.

Outside auditors doing anything in CA government? We'll see that only when all else is lost, and people are starting to go to prison.

Comment: Re:DirectX is obsolete (Score 2) 88

by bloodhawk (#48901265) Attached to: DirectX 12 Lies Dormant Within Microsoft's Recent Windows 10 Update

PC gaming is currently over 20 Billion and is still growing (though slowly), Mobile gaming is around 20-25 billion as well, how the fuck do you turn a 50% market share into a drop in the bucket? Regardless they are two separate markets. You can't compare mobile games to desktop games, of course those games would never do as well on a desktop, how would COD, Halo, Far Cry do on a mobile device?

Comment: Still joking? (Score 1) 176

If somehow the cost of driving went steeply up, you (and your competitors) can switch to an alternative means of transportation and still keep doing whatever you do for a living.

If the cost of driving went substantially up, then taxis and public transport would also increase in cost. At some level of increase, no I could not do what I do.

That's not the case of uber

Why not? New service, UberRickshaw. Many Uber rides are short enough that would work.

It'a no more ridiculous a thought than you trying to create an arbitrary separation between me driving a friend across town and someone I don't know.

since their for-profit use of publicly-funded infrastructure

Which I and my rider pay for regardless of us knowing each other or not.

You know you've landed gear-up when it takes full power to taxi.

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