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Submission + - Wi-Fi Alliance touts survey numbers as LTE-U showdown looms (networkworld.com)

JG0LD writes: The Wi-Fi Alliance, an industry group that certifies Wi-Fi products for interoperability, has highlighted the importance of the technology to the daily lives of Americans ahead of a testing summit that will try to shed some light on potential conflicts between Wi-Fi and a carrier technology called LTE-U.

Submission + - What if Windows went open source tomorrow? (networkworld.com)

JG0LD writes: Thinking out loud about Microsoft making Windows an open source project is a great way to get your friends and colleagues wondering seriously about your mental health. It’s an idea strange enough to sound practically paradoxical, like “hot ice” or “short Pink Floyd songs.”

Submission + - 255 terabits a second: New fiber speed record? (networkworld.com)

JG0LD writes: Researchers from the University of Central Florida and Eindhoven University of Technology say that they’ve developed a new fiber optic medium that allows data to be sent and received at up to 255Tbps, a roughly twenty-fold increase over current fiber.

Submission + - Open-source player-tracking project kicks off (networkworld.com)

JG0LD writes: Andrew Schechtman-Rook is an astronomer by profession and a serious New York Jets fan by inclination. He’s also heavily into sophisticated analysis of the game of football, and has created the first step in what may be a democratized system of player tracking.

Submission + - Is Too Much Computer Time Killing Kids' Ability to Learn?

Rambo Tribble writes: A teacher's union in Northern Ireland is asserting that children spending too much time on computers are impairing their ability to learn. The asserted excessive computer use is being blamed for an inability to concentrate or socialize. As one teacher puts it, '... these gadgets are really destroying their ability to learn.' One question no one seems to be asking is whether the kids showing these symptoms are getting enough sleep.

Submission + - 5 Years Later, 'Do Not Track' System Ineffective (computerworld.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: In 2009, a few Internet privacy advocates developed an idea that was supposed to give people a way to tell websites they don't want to be monitored as they move from website to website. The mechanism, which would eventually be built into all the major browsers, was called Do Not Track. ... But today, DNT hangs by a thread, neutered by a failure among stakeholders to reach agreement. Yes, if you turn it on in your browser, it sends a signal in the form of an HTTP header to Web companies' servers. But it probably won't change what data they collect. That's because most websites either don't honor DNT — it's currently a voluntary system — or they interpret it in different ways. Another problem — perhaps the biggest — is that Web companies, ad agencies and the other stakeholders have never reached agreement on what "do not track" really means.

Submission + - In pictures: Best desktop distros for newbies (networkworld.com)

JG0LD writes: Ah, the siren call of desktop Linux. You usually hear it just after Windows starts bullying you to restart so that it can install updates, or when you see cool screenies of Linux desktop environments like KDE and Cinammon. But which distro should the novice start with?

Submission + - Google Plus now minus chief Vic Gundotra (networkworld.com)

JG0LD writes: Vic Gundotra, the man behind Google Plus and one of Google’s most prominent executives, announced today that he will leave the company “effective immediately.” Gundotra made the announcement, appropriately enough, in a lengthy Google Plus post, praising his co-workers and saying that he is “excited about what’s next.” However, he did not further outline his future plans, saying that “this isn't the day to talk about that.”

Submission + - Crowded U.S. airwaves desperately in search of spectrum breathing room (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: Ahead of a major new spectrum auction scheduled for next year, America's four major wireless carriers are jockeying for position in the frequencies available to them, buying, selling and trading licenses to important parts of the nation's airwaves. Surging demand for mobile bandwidth, fueled by an increasingly saturated smartphone market and data-hungry apps, has showed no signs of slowing down. This, understandably, has the wireless industry scrambling to improve its infrastructure in a number of areas, including the amounts of raw spectrum available to the carriers. These shifts, however, are essentially just lateral moves – nothing to directly solve the problems posed by a crowded spectrum. What’s really going to save the wireless world, some experts think, is a more comprehensive re-imagining of the way spectrum is used.

"The most important thing in a man is not what he knows, but what he is." -- Narciso Yepes