Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Note: You can take 10% off all Slashdot Deals with coupon code "slashdot10off." ×

Submission + - US agency to seek consensus on volatile topic of vulnerability disclosures->

alphadogg writes: A U.S. agency hopes to gather security researchers, software vendors and other interested people to reach consensus on the sticky topic of how to disclose cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Beginning in September, the U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) will host a series of meetings intended to improve collaboration among security researchers, software vendors and IT system operators on the disclosure of, and response to, vulnerabilities. http://www.ntia.doc.gov/federa...
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Massachusetts boarding school sued over Wi-Fi sickness->

alphadogg writes: The parents of an anonymous student at the Fay School in Southborough, Mass., allege that the Wi-Fi at the institution is making their child sick, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court earlier this month. The child, identified only as “G” in court documents, is said to suffer from electromagnetic hypersensitivity syndrome. The radio waves emitted by the school’s Wi-Fi routers cause G serious discomfort and physical harm, according to the suit. http://ftpcontent3.worldnow.co...
Link to Original Source

Submission + - New malware turns your computer into a cellular antenna->

alphadogg writes: A group of Israeli researchers have improved on a way to steal data from air-gapped computers, thought to be safer from attack due to their isolation from the Internet. They’ve figured out how to turn the computer into a cellular transmitter, leaking bits of data that can be picked up by a nearby low-end mobile phone. Their research, which will be featured next week at the 24th USENIX Security Symposium in Washington, D.C., is the first to show it’s possible to steal data using just specialized malware on the computer and the mobile phone.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - SDN switches not hard to compromise, researcher says->

alphadogg writes: Software-defined switches hold a lot of promise for network operators, but new research due to be presented at Black Hat will show that security measures haven't quite caught up yet. Gregory Pickett, founder of the Chicago-based security firm Hellfire Security, has developed several attacks against network switches that use Onie, the Linux-based Open Network Install Environment that competes with OpenDaylight. Being able to exploit the vulnerability to put malware on SDN switches would have full visibility into all of the traffic running through the switch, enabling large-scale spying.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Critical BIND denial-of-service flaw could disrupt large portions of Internet->

alphadogg writes: Attackers could exploit a new vulnerability in BIND, the most popular Domain Name System (DNS) server software, to disrupt the Internet for many users. The vulnerability affects all versions of BIND 9, from BIND 9.1.0 to BIND 9.10.2-P2, and can be exploited to crash DNS servers that are powered by the software. The vulnerability announced and patched by the Internet Systems Consortium https://www.isc.org/blogs/cve-... is critical because it can be used to crash both authoritative and recursive DNS servers with a single packet.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Americas are just 2 weeks away from running out of IPv4 addresses->

alphadogg writes: John Curran, CEO of the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), told attendees at the Campus Technology conference in Boston on Wednesday that the IP address authority's pool of IPv4 addresses has dwindled to 90,000 and will be exhausted in about two weeks. "This is a pretty dramatic issue," says Curran, who founded ARIN in 1997 and was once CTO of Internet pioneer BBN. Curran’s revelation came during a talk during which he urged IT pros from educational institutions to upgrade their public facing websites to IPv6 as soon as possible.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Q&A: New Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins starts job in "hyper-connected" mode->

alphadogg writes: When Cisco Systems employees head into work Monday they’ll encounter something they haven’t seen in two decades: A new boss. Chuck Robbins – formerly senior vice president of worldwide operations – takes over as CEO from John Chambers, one of the most visible and quotable figures in business. In this early-access interview with John Gallant, chief content officer of IDG US Media, Robbins sets out his priorities for Cisco and his new management team, and talks about the opportunities and challenges facing the network giant. Robbins dissects the competitive landscape and explains why so-called ‘white box’ data center gear and software-defined networks are not the threats to Cisco that some pundits contend.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Cell service at US airports varies from 1st class to middle-seat coach->

alphadogg writes: Need something to watch on a flight? You can download an episode of your favorite show in less than a minute and a half on Verizon Wireless at Atlanta’s airport—or spend 13 hours doing the same over T-Mobile USA at Los Angeles International. The comparison of 45-minute HD video downloads illustrates the wide variation in cellular service at U.S. airports, which RootMetrics laid out in a report for the first half of 2015 that’s being issued Thursday. Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson is the best place to go mobile and Verizon covers airports best overall, but just like security lines and de-icing delays, it all depends.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Belgian government phishing test goes off-track->

alphadogg writes: An IT security drill went off the tracks in Belgium, prompting a regional government office to apologize to European high-speed train operator Thalys for involving it without warning. Belgium’s Flemish regional government sent a mock phishing email to about 20,000 of its employees to see how they would react. Hilarity and awkwardness ensued, with some employees contacting Thalys directly to complain, and others contacting the cops...
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Industry group to bring web-scale tech to enterprises->

alphadogg writes: Some of the biggest names in IT and online services have banded together to standardize the way applications are run in the cloud. Organized by the Linux Foundation, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation was announced Tuesday and has drawn the support of Cisco, IBM, Intel, VMware, CoreOS, Docker, and Joyent. It is also getting input from cloud service providers such as Box, eBay and Twitter.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Grooveshark co-founder Josh Greenberg dead at 28->

alphadogg writes: The tech startup world has been shaken today by news that 28-year-old Josh Greenberg, co-founder of recently defunct music sharing service Grooveshark, was found dead on Sunday in the Florida apartment he shared with his girlfriend. No foul play is suspected, but the local medical examiner is conducting an autopsy, according to the Gainesville Sun. Grooveshark was shut down in April after the company was threatened with legal action and possibly hundreds of millions in damages by several big music labels.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - The tech behind U2's latest concert video effects->

alphadogg writes: rish rockers U2 are continuing to innovate in their use of video on the current Innocence + Experience tour, and behind the scenes is some extremely high-performance, all-flash technology. Video show director Stefaan “Smasher” Desmedt is using an all-flash configuration of a ruggedized EMC VNXe3200 to help run the spectacle, pulling new video projects and archived footage to show on massive specialized displays that hang overhead. He also incorporates live video as it’s being captured for display on the conventional giant screens that are commonly seen in arenas.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Wi-Fi Aware lets apps make their presence known->

alphadogg writes: A new feature of Wi-Fi could help people find both each other and things nearby, without even being near a hotspot. The group that puts the Wi-Fi badge on phones, laptops and countless other gadgets is now starting to certify products for Wi-Fi Aware, a way for apps to make their presence known to devices nearby. Because it’s peer to peer, the system works anywhere there’s more than one Wi-Fi Aware device. The new system provides a way to do all this between devices instead of over a network, using brief messages that are more efficient than full-blown Wi-Fi in terms of power and data.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - IT pros blast Google over Android's refusal to play nice with IPv6->

alphadogg writes: The widespread popularity of Android devices and the general move to IPv6 has put some businesses in a tough position, thanks to Android’s lack of support for a central component in the newer standard. DHCPv6 is an outgrowth of the DHCP protocol used in the older IPv4 standard – it’s an acronym for “dynamic host configuration protocol,” and is a key building block of network management. Nevertheless, Google’s wildly popular Android devices – which accounted for 78% of all smartphones shipped worldwide in the first quarter of this year – don’t support DHCPv6 for address assignment.
Link to Original Source

Byte your tongue.

Working...