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Quickies

+ - The face, not the body, attracts a mate.

Submitted by
Ant
Ant writes "New Scientist reports that it appears that the opposite sex is much more interested in human's face than their bulging biceps or elegant figure, especially if you're a man. At least that's the upshot of the first study to assess how much faces and bodies contribute to someone's overall attractiveness... Seen on Blue's News."
Star Wars Prequels

+ - Star Wars voted most influential effects movie

Submitted by GuyMannDude
GuyMannDude (574364) writes ""Star Wars" has been voted the most influential visual effects film of all time by film trade organization, the Visual Effects Society (VES). Lucas has been praised for ushering in a new era of special effects and visual wizardry with his "Star Wars" films. "Blade Runner," the sci-fi thriller from 1982 directed by Ridley Scott came in second place followed by "2001: A Space Odyssey" which tied for third with "The Matrix." A full list of the 50 most influential visual effects movies is available as a PDF file online."
The Media

+ - The Next Frontier in Outsourcing

Submitted by GuyMannDude
GuyMannDude (574364) writes "Outsourcing first claimed manufacturing jobs, then hit services such as technical support, airline reservations and tax preparation. Now comes the next frontier: local journalism. A news site has posted a job listing that reads "We seek a newspaper journalist based in India to report on the city government and political scene of Pasadena, California, USA." The editor and publisher of the two-year-old Web site pasadenanow.com acknowledges that the advertisement — which appears in the Indian version of craiglist — is unusual but believes it "could be a significant way to increase the quality of journalism on the local level without the expense that is a major problem for local publications." As one might expect, the plan has plenty of detractors, including journalism professors."
Input Devices

+ - Scientists Discover Genitalia Arms Race in Ducks

Submitted by GuyMannDude
GuyMannDude (574364) writes "From the you-go-girl department, Scientists are reporting that some female ducks and geese have evolved complex genitalia to thwart unwelcome mating attempts. The study details how vaginas of some duck species have evolved to feature complex structures designed to reduce the chances of forced impregnation. Male genitalia have evolved similarly to tip the odds in their favor, resulting in a sort of evolutionary "arms race" in which control over reproduction alternates between the sexes."
Quickies

+ - Cold Fusion Reborn?

Submitted by Icarus1919
Icarus1919 (802533) writes "New Scientist reports that the scientist who discovered a possible fusion reaction by bombarding a solvent with neutrons and sonic waves (known as cold fusion because you don't have to deal with those sun-like temperatures and magnetic fields) has recently been exonerated of accusations of scientific misconduct Purdue University following the verification of his results by another scientist. Is cold fusion back?"
Security

+ - Virtual war helps US soldiers deal with trauma

Submitted by
Novotny
Novotny writes "The Guardian is reporting on the use of the game engine for Full Spectrum Warrior, alongside 8 smells (including gunpowder, cordite, burning rubber, Iraqi spices, barbecued lamb and body odour) in treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Iraq veterans. Whilst anything that helps our soldiers get over undoubtably harrowing experiences is worth trying, I wonder how long it will be until Jack Thompson pipes up claiming this is further evidence that video gaming is a bad experience for anyone, nevermind kids?"
Mozilla

+ - Firefox 3 to support offline apps

Submitted by thinkingpen
thinkingpen (1031996) writes "Read/Write web is carrying an interesting story about Firefox 3. From the article — "An interesting tidbit came out of the recent Foo Camp New Zealand (which unfortunately I wasn't able to attend). Robert O'Callahan from Mozilla, who is based in NZ but drives the rendering engine of Mozilla/FireFox, spoke about how Firefox 3 will deliver support for offline applications. This is significant because you'll be able to use your web apps — like Gmail, Google Docs & Spreadsheets, Google Calendar, etc — in the browser even when offline. I deliberately mentioned all Google web apps there, because of course this plays right into Google's hands." Now thats web 3.0 ?"
Sci-Fi

+ - Regrowing lost body parts coming in the future

Submitted by
[TheBORG]
[TheBORG] writes "There are two stories on Yahoo! News about regrowing lost body parts. One is about regrowing lost fingers & limbs and the other one is about regrowing teeth. The story about regrowing lost fingers and limbs talks about the experimental use of powdered pig bladder to regrow fingers and eventually lost limbs for soldiers and others in need from information that Pentagon-funded scientists hopefully learn from studying the salamander. The story about regrowing teeth talks about how Japanese scientists used primitive cells (not quite as early as stem cells) and injected them into a framework of collagen (the material that holds the body together). Once grown to a certain point, scientists implanted the growths into mice where the teeth developed normally."
The Internet

+ - MPAA: We were just trying it out

Submitted by
Firmafest
Firmafest writes "Yesterday, slashdot ran a story about MPAA violating a software licence. Now MPAA responds with "We were only testing". Is this a fair response? The author of the software writes: "Whilst that all sounds fair enough but I doubt I'd get away with pirating a few movies providing I didn't advertise it and only used them for testing purposes. hmmm!""
Programming

+ - Did D-Wave really demonstrate a quantum computer?

Submitted by Qubert
Qubert (666) writes "Was D-Wave's quantum computer demo last week the real thing? Ars Technica takes a look inside the cold, black box and concludes that whatever was in there, it probably wasn't a 'pure' quantum computer: 'Jumping off the fence, we will say that we think D-Wave demonstrated a real device; however, we think their device is going to set off a debate in the physics community over where the boundary between classical and quantum computation is. At present, quantum computers are "globally phase coherent," which means that every qubit's state is entangled (and therefore correlated) with every other qubit... The D-wave system, however, is certainly not globally phase coherent, which raises the question of whether it is a quantum computer.'"
Television

+ - Robert Adler, co-inventor of TV remote, dead at 93

Submitted by
yroJJory
yroJJory writes "Hit the mute button for a moment of silence: The co-inventor of the TV remote, Robert Adler, has died. Adler, who won an Emmy Award along with fellow engineer Eugene Polley for the device that made the couch potato possible, died Thursday of heart failure at a Boise nursing home at 93, Zenith Electronics Corp. said Friday.

In his six-decade career with Zenith, Adler was a prolific inventor, earning more than 180 U.S. patents. He was best known for his 1956 Zenith Space Command remote control, which helped make TV a truly sedentary pastime.

In a May 2004 interview with The Associated Press, Adler recalled being among two dozen engineers at Zenith given the mission to find a new way for television viewers to change channels without getting out of their chairs or tripping over a cable.

Adler also was considered a pioneer in SAW technology, or surface acoustic waves, in color television sets and touch screens. The technology has also been used in cellular telephones.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office published his most recent patent application, for advances in touch screen technology, on Feb. 1."
Microsoft

+ - Has Microsoft Patented A Successor To Clippy?

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "IWeek blogger Alex Wolfe theorizes that Microsoft might be searching for a successor to 'Clippy, the iconic paperclip which was featured in Office from 1997 until the folks at Redmond got tired of the ridicule and retired it in 2004. The most promising candidate may be an eye with a rotating iris. What's equally notable is that Microsoft seems to be taking a page from its attempt to trademark the English word "Windows," and has patented the icon for a camcorder. Do you think this is the typical patent work of a big company, or has Microsoft got something up its sleeve here?"

"Consistency requires you to be as ignorant today as you were a year ago." -- Bernard Berenson

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