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Comment Re: Islam's relationship to modern science (Score 1) 330

Well write it into the constitution of the country then if you're that worried - it sorta works in Lebanon (well actually it's a total cluster duck right now but that's because of Syria).

In Lebanon the seats in Parliament are allocated by sect, Christians get half, Muslims (including fringe groups like Alawis and Druze) get the other half.

The president is ALWAYS a Maronite Catholic, the Prime Minister a Sunni and the speaker of Parliament a Twelver Shia.

Or shit, just give them residency papers and not citizenship and there's no problem with voting at all..

Comment Re: Islam's relationship to modern science (Score 5, Insightful) 330

Yes, because Shariah does not allow a valid Caliph (whom al-Baghdadi is, btw - he meets all the qualifications including being Qurayshi, the first real Caliph since like the Abbasids) to recognise any borders or accept any peace treaties longer than 10 years.

It's the duty of the Caliph to wage Jihad and conquer as much as possible territory to be included in Dar al-Islam - should he not do so, he would no longer be worthy of bays'a [allegiance] of Muslims.

It's not so much lebensraum but rather territory that hasn't yet been occupied by the Ummah (basically the nation that is Muslim).

This is the hardcore Salafi doctrine by which people like Daeesh operate by and it's theologically valid, though batshit insane.

HOWEVER, only about 70-80% of Muslims are Sunnis and of those maybe 10-15% are Salafis.

So no, the "mohammedic brutalism" will not be carried with them - they've seen what life under a Caliphate is like and they want the hell out of there.

I can say this with some certainty as during my last 3 years in Beirut (which BTW has more Syrian refugees than ANY Western city) say that the Daeesh are a bunch of psychopathic foreign assholes led by an eloquent sociopath from Baghdad.


Ask Slashdot: Selecting a Version Control System For an Inexperienced Team 325

An anonymous reader writes: I have been programming in Python for quite a while, but so far I have not used a version control system. For a new project, a lot more people (10-15) are expected to contribute to the code base, many of them have never written a single line of Python but C, LabVIEW or Java instead. This is a company decision that can be seen as a Python vs. LabVIEW comparison — if successful the company is willing to migrate all code to Python. The code will be mostly geared towards data acquisition and data analysis leading to reports. At the moment I have the feeling, that managing that data (=measurements + reports) might be done within the version control system since this would generate an audit trail on the fly. So far I have been trying to select a version control system, based on google I guess it should be git or mercurial. I get the feeling, that they are quite similar for basic things. I expect, that the differences will show up when more sophisticated topics/problems are addressed — so to pick one I would have to learn both — what are your suggestions? Read below for more specifics.

Comment Re:No it hasn't (Score 2) 157

Yeah, I'm sort of failing to see the point here as well - running your classic z/OS backend stuff and then having a few zIFLs talking to the backend over HiperSockets (IIRC) made sense, but just a big zSeries box with no way to run legacy apps?

I'm not sure but I guess the market will decide..

Comment Re:So it competes with SUN. (Score 1) 157

You do realise you can emulate a z/Series using Hercules and use that for development, right?

No need to fork out $100K+ (also since these Linux-only z boxes won't have any CP's, just zIFLs, I think the base price might come down)

And since it's pretty easy to set up virtualised instances (either using LPARs or say z/VM), you could always share one of these boxes amongst multiple users.

Comment Re:Question (Score 1) 219

Yup. Salt (well a sachet of infant electrolyte mix) and access to clean water would solve that problem as the kids tend to die from dehydration.

Not in ALL cases but the death rate would definitely go down. Back when I was working as a dive master on the coast of the Sinai desert, we used to take the baby rehydration sachets all the time if we'd overindulged in the post-diving beers the night before.

Comment Re:Remember TEMPEST? (Score 1) 264

No, it isn't. GPG / PGP is a hybrid cryptosystem just like SSL and SSH. Not sure where you got this idea from..

Do you realise the sort of processing overheads that encrypting mega/gigabytes in RSA involves?

It would have taken a LONG time to encrypt a single HD floppy image back in 1991 when PGP was first developed.

365 Days of drinking Lo-Cal beer. = 1 Lite-year