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Comment Re:Impressive, if true (Score 1) 248 248

Nope: http://www.esa.int/esapub/bull...

You can get to the Moon for circa 800 ms-1 for a flyby. Injection is more but can be done for well under 3000 if you're willing to wait.

You are right - obviously you can't actually land on that, and manoeuvering/circularization adds more, but there's been a lot of work on this.

The 3000 figure is if you're using the classic, fast approach of the Apollo missions. But you can also do it very cheaply - so cheaply you could get enough delta-V out of a sufficiently high orbit Cubesat with arc-thrusters.

Comment Re:Impressive, if true (Score 2) 248 248

The Saturn V was intended to beat the Russians there, not necessarily be cost efficient. This type of mission almost certainly is based on using a commerical crew mission and 1 or 2 additional launches of a service module + propulsion module to go there. Once you're in orbit, after all, it only takes something like an extra 800 ms-1 of delta-V to get to the moon (less if you want to get really tricky about it, but with humans speed is a factor too).

Comment Re:Statism vs. Libertarianism again (Score 1) 123 123

"High crime in Republican states" can mean high crime in Democratic-run areas within Republican states.

Yeah it could. Of course he doesn't know that, because he didn't do even a cursory review of the data before he formed his opinions. Of course I don't either, but that's also because who runs a district is pretty irrelevant to a discussion of whether district, state and federal policy combinations are leading to a particular outcome.

For comparison: mass shootings of the type the US have do not occur in the developed world at anything like the frequency they do in the US. And the US has had to redefine "mass" in the media to mean more then 3-4 people at the same time.

Comment Re: Citizen of Belgium here (Score 1) 1307 1307

The loans were not a favor. The loans were to pay back German and French private investors and transfer their exposure to Greek insolvency to the IMF and ECB.

Greece didn't actually get "billions in loans". It got billions of dollars laundered through it's account books and back out to private investors to protect French and German interests.

But I'm mostly ranting at the internet tough guy outlook which is why Greeks are voting down austerity measures as they are: they are a sovereign nation, no you don't own them, and if you're wondering where you tax-dollars are maybe you should ask why your government loaned them all to Greece in the first place?

Comment Re:Good (Score 1) 1307 1307

Instead of asking for austerity, what the EU SHOULD be doing is saying to the Greeks "you wont get any more money from us unless you get rid of the corruption and collect the taxes your laws say you are supposed to be collecting". If Greece actually collected all the tax the laws say they are entitled to collect, they wouldn't be in the trouble they are in.

Only problem is that the same oligarchs, rich people, big companies etc that are not paying their taxes in Greece are also lobbying the EU under the table asking the EU to reject any Greek bailout plans that involve collecting these taxes.

Great: Greece defaults, leaves the Euro by fiat, the IMF and ECB take a bath (as well as any creditors who weren't important enough graciously bailed out by those two entities), and then Spain, Portugal and Italy do the same only this time the private creditors get to the wear it.

So buy buy any bank in Europe still exposed to that. Was your bank smart enough to avoid exposure like that? Are you sure?

People who think the solution is "stop giving them money" clearly don't know what a debt default actually is. Hint: it's when you stop giving them money.

Comment Re: Good (Score 1) 1307 1307

Except for the fact the Greeks voted the Anti Austerity party into power.

And so why not?

Austerity is code for "fuck the poor, the middle class, and anyone who can't afford a private yacht and an overseas bank account".

Why should the Greek people suffer for the whims of French and German financiers and their ability to manipulate their governments to shield them from their mistakes at the expense of the Greek people?

A default looks pretty god damn similar to austerity measures, with the massive benefit that suddenly you can trade in your own currency again, and because it's so cheap you have a competitive advantage.

Comment Re:Citizen of Belgium here (Score 1) 1307 1307

No, no they shouldn't. The Federal government exercises federal power over AIG (or can, if they chose to wield it). Banks do not exercise federal power over the Greek federal government, which is thus the problem. In this situation, a floating currency is good because it lets regular market signalling hit the Greek government and allows business and investors to set their prices appropriately. Sans that, with the Euro, and you've got this situation where the Greek government cannot simply let it's currency devalue and (mostly, sans huge corruption) let natural market forces sort things out.

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