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Comment: Re:Learning Lab (Score 1) 263

by Electricity Likes Me (#47942201) Attached to: Slashdot Asks: What's In Your Home Datacenter?

My purchase of the year last year was a 42u rack for $1 off ebay.

Though technically I think the seller got a better deal, because I had to navigate that thing down the narrowest stairs ever before getting into an elevator it couldn't stand up in. I think basically I paid them for the removal bill.

Comment: This won't amount to anything... (Score 4, Interesting) 120

It's been shown that all these "helical" polarization schemes are degenerate forms of MIMO essentially, and can't achieve speeds better then what MIMO antenna configurations can.

At short distances in quiet environments, you can do a heck of a lot which will never, ever work anywhere but in that experiment.

Comment: Re:Grim (Score 2) 221

by Electricity Likes Me (#47933575) Attached to: Obama Presses Leaders To Speed Ebola Response

There is some level of quarantine - the liberian government blockaded in the slum area where a clinic was raided, and sealed off about 50,000 people. That's probably about the limit of their efforts.

But frankly, you're also ignoring what's been actually happening: such an ambassador catching Ebola in one country, knowingly returning to another (via air travel), then staying in a hotel without telling anyone being treated in secret by a doctor, who also doesn't tell anyone, goes home, and spreads it to his wife.

Queue a couple 1000 potentially infected, by a vector which would be utterly missed due to plain old corruption and idiocy.

So what do you do now? Expand the quarantine? Do you even have enough troops to do that? And in the meantime, what about all the regular issues such as food and water, sanitation and normal completely curable diseases which will take hold.

Comment: Re:Sounds like Mr. Torvalds has an opinion. (Score 1) 359

by Electricity Likes Me (#47927191) Attached to: Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

I think he just doesn't care about things that don't get in his way.

A few weeks ago, when systemd would lock up the system if you turned kernel debugging on, he did have rather colorful opinions about systemd and the systemd developers who insisted that systemd was doing the correct thing.

That's also just Linus reacting to stuff he thinks he's right about. And well, he frequently is. I don't really approve of the way he structures his rants sometimes, but the dude gets things done.

Comment: Re:Simple set of pipelined utilties! (Score 2) 359

by Electricity Likes Me (#47927147) Attached to: Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

It can be a collection of utilities all dependent on each other, running 3 or 5 or 15 services all communicating with each other, all to bring up the system and supply system state management. This is the simplest and easiest way to make a complex system

Why not make 3-15 modularly written sets of source files, and compile them into a single binary ? It's hardly more complex than 3-15 separate programs, and it makes communication of structured information a lot easier.

And is in fact, how SystemD is put together and intended to be expanded, for better or worse.

Comment: Re:When can we stop selling party balloons (Score 1) 296

by Electricity Likes Me (#47884695) Attached to: WD Announces 8TB, 10TB Helium Hard Drives

It's not being priced according to the long-term cost or capability of supplying the volumes that are being drawn from the stockpile on a sustainable basis, which is what you'd actually do if you were running a business dealing in actual production.

Yes, clearly all the people investing THEIR OWN MONEY are complete idiots, and you, a random guy on the internet, are so much smarter than actual investors and professional geologists. So does this mean you are going to invest all your money in helium futures, that are obviously going to be worth billions when the helium runs out, just like all the arm chair doomsayers are predicting?

Will you take the futures option the other way? That the current prices are going to stay at the level they are for say, the next ~20 years plus or minus 10%?

I don't know who you think is investing in this. People are just buying helium because they need it. The smart people are investing in gas mining because that's always profitable, and the big companies building huge helium liquefaction facilities are absolutely betting the price is going to rise in the near future.

Apparently the free market thinks you're kind of an idiot about this.

Comment: Re:When can we stop selling party balloons (Score 2) 296

by Electricity Likes Me (#47868167) Attached to: WD Announces 8TB, 10TB Helium Hard Drives

Yes I guess that is why a gas we can only mine tiny quantities of from natural gas reserves is currently being sold off for party balloon use.

Helium is being sold off at any bid price on the assumption that the stockpile is unlimited and needs to be liquidated. It's not being priced according to the long-term cost or capability of supplying the volumes that are being drawn from the stockpile on a sustainable basis, which is what you'd actually do if you were running a business dealing in actual production.

Comment: Re:Lame (Score 4, Interesting) 730

by Electricity Likes Me (#47866467) Attached to: Apple Announces Smartwatch, Bigger iPhones, Mobile Payments

A great watch is expensive and made in Switzerland. That's how watches work. Nothing about them makes any sense because the product is fundamentally not about time telling technology, except in an abstract "it's pretty awesome this is just gears and springs" sort of way.

This is not a good smartwatch at $350. It's a bad sportswatch - because it doesn't standalone from the iPhone, doesn't have GPS, and yet is in the same price bracket.

My personal opinion is that on deeper analysis the whole smartwatch thing is a deadend which is being pushed because it's looks achievable, rather then innovative. But there's some fairly obvious problems with what Apple has on display - and they're the same ones as every other smartwatch.

Comment: This thread basically proves the point... (Score 5, Insightful) 818

Seriously, the number of people talking about how this isn't a problem, while simultaneously - gleefully - discussing what they'll do if someone tries to take their room, or someone won't let them take their room, pretty much dismisses any counter-argument to the idea that there isn't a problem.

There obviously is.

Comment: Re:Lets use Anthropo-sedatives instead .. (Score 1) 818

If the plane has an emergency in any place that's not "on the ground and stationary" your chances of being a survivor are pretty much zero anyway.

But if we went with the Fifth Element approach, you could design planes which could eject their passengers in parachuting buoyant pods or something.

Comment: Re:Troll much? (Score 1) 613

by Electricity Likes Me (#47815139) Attached to: You Got Your Windows In My Linux

Who cares? Do you really think it needs to be ported to Windows?

Do you really not acknowledge the existance of FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, AIX, Solaris, HP-UX, and more?

OpenBSDs entire development philosophy is to develop only for BSD, and let porting take place as patchsets on top of it.

That's why LibreSSL has has support for Windows stripped out, despite it being an important SSL platform.

Comment: Re:It's a proxy for needing to revamp the post sys (Score 1) 215

by Electricity Likes Me (#47804687) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

And you have missed all the subtlety of the problem. For one thing, there's no way anyone's fitting an iPad package into a mailbox, or even through a mailslot.

There's no way to distribute or update keys rapidly enough to make them general use for delivery companies and the post.

Which is the entire point: the century of mail was for mail with packages considered the exception. Special case enough to warrant needing to be physically present to receive them, or simply gambling nobody steals them when left on the front porch.

Basically you might want to take your last line there and apply it to yourself.

If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

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