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Comment: Re:Why Cold Fusion (or something like it) Is Real (Score 1) 335

by Electricity Likes Me (#48180769) Attached to: The Physics of Why Cold Fusion Isn't Real

If this was the case, why does he consistently reproduce it? Where are the failures? Does he only have one? Why has no one mentioned this failure rate? Or that it only works with material from a certain source? No one in science thinks these are unreasonable questions - they're usually very interesting!

There was a lot of work done finding the right source of talc for a particular medical procedure, because if they sourced it from somewhere else then it would turn out to be toxic. No one really knows why, although detailed study means we think it's now somewhat related to the -OH group concentration on the surface. Maybe.

The problem is, this isn't what's being relayed. Instead Rossi keeps details vague, because if you actually had details, you'd be able to go looking at the problem and actually do some science.

Comment: Re: Some Sense Restored? (Score 1) 505

by Electricity Likes Me (#48180657) Attached to: Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

So it can't run a desktop. Or a laptop. Or any system where network status might change really.

It requires a whole min $50,000 a year employee to keep it running (sysadmin). You're going to write a separate HA failover daemon (or you're going to use...something that will look a lot like an init system).

You want to log to file but don't now if the disk is mounted, and writeable (again: how are you going to ensure this, what do you do if it fails?).

And this is just your simple network service. What about console services? Localization? Graphics? Drivers and daemons for hardware?

This is just a crazy suggestion, but maybe a normal computer is fairly complex since people want their computer to do a lot of things, and if you have such simple requirements, then you shouldn't be installing a desktop or (apparently in your example case) server OS. I would suggest a microcontroller. Of course even there you'll still need some type of bootloader to get things running...

Comment: Re:I still don't see what's wrong with X (Score 2) 196

And no one uses "command stream" style network rendering, nor is it actually faster, in 2014.

The only advantage X has over networked graphics is that you can forward the socket and have the app pop up in it's own window on your machine....but you can't detach and re-attach to it, or move it locally or remotely to another machine, and the actual rendering is effectively a very unnecessarily chatty bitmap stream anyway (hence why things like x2go are such huge improvements).

Remote apps and desktop on Linux *suck* compared to something like Remote Desktop on Windows, and it's absurd.

Wayland can easily, and has been shown to, support the same type of functionality, and can do it better and faster by simply sending a normal image stream.

Comment: Re:Hoax (Score 1) 972

What does "sophisticated" mean?

Do they measure high frequency currents? Are all the wires accounted for and individual conductors measured? Are the path ways through the 3-phase power adequately monitored? Are their oscilloscopes hooked up to monitor the voltages (a good way to spot surreptitious activity via unusual waveforms)?

Of course their aren't.

So you've got an elaborate looking setup, which doesn't actually thoroughly cover the heat production aspect, and doesn't thoroughly cover all the electrical inputs to the system. There's a non-descript "power box" considered to not be part of the device under test, despite being supplied by the device inventor.

Comment: Re:Units (Score 2) 972

2 kW is less current then a standard single phase socket puts out. It is ably carried by 1mm or smaller conductors. There was a 3-phase power supply involved in this experiment, connected to something which is functionally a bar heater.

Not quite. But a resistive heater, yes.

The values for total power out that they computer are only in the 2200 W range - still practically doable by our aformentioned single phase power socket.

So yes, tiny is the correct word.

How do you figure? 2200 W for 720 hours straight is twice the amount of electric power a U.S. household consumes in the same period of time. No, I don't call that tiny. Why? Because allegedly it came from ONE GRAM of fuel. As I mentioned above, you have to account for the size of the source, when measuring whether it's tiny or large. It's all relative.

The experiment was carried out in Europe. Europe uses 220-240VAC. And yes: that's tiny. In the sense that they produced no value which is substantially larger then could have been trivially supplied through surreptitious means by miswired connections. Its not some big accomplishment to get 2kW in and out of something using regular electrical gear from a hardware store. It's not hard to get 720 hours out of that gear.

So no amount of energy in excess of what very conventional wiring and equipment can supply was delivered.

Comment: Re:Units (Score 1) 972

No that's one megawatt for one hour - which is why it's an incredibly weird thing to use for a month. For the length of a month that's equivalent to 2kW for 720 hours, assuming 30 days, so a LOT less than typically household usage.

Pardon me. The number I first found when I looked up average household usage was way off.

So... average U.S. household is about 10.5 MWH. This thing put out 1.5 MWH in one month (more or less). Multiply by 12 and you get 16 MWH, which is higher than the average in even the state with the highest average, LA, which is 15 MWH.

Still, again, it's anything but tiny. You have to account for the mass of the device. Even more so for the mass of the fuel.

You don't have a shred of evidence that it's a "con". Only guesses. And bad guesses at that. Not good enough.

2 kW is less current then a standard single phase socket puts out. It is ably carried by 1mm or smaller conductors. There was a 3-phase power supply involved in this experiment, connected to something which is functionally a bar heater.

The values for total power out that they computer are only in the 2200 W range - still practically doable by our aformentioned single phase power socket.

So yes, tiny is the correct word.

Comment: Re:Hoax (Score 1) 972

No but the inventor who supplied a "power box" which was sitting in front of the 3-phase power to the device, and was on site for the setup and allowed to tamper with the device at various times very well could have.

People who haven't dealt with complex (literally) power systems always chronically underestimate how many ways you can get power into a system which will not be obviously represented as volts and amps via measurement devices.

What the scientists have in their briefcases is terrifying. -- Nikita Khruschev

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