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Comment: Re:crap direction (Score 1) 185

by TheRaven64 (#49385795) Attached to: Why More 'Star Wars' Actors Don't Become Stars
I could have put up with the bad acting if there had been a good script and a story that made sense. Rewatching some of the original Star Trek is like that: the acting is wooden and the sets are obviously cheap, but there's some fantastic dialog and story telling in there. Hint for writers: if your script relies on everyone in the universe being stupid at the same time, it may be realistic but it's not going to be enjoyable (unless it's a comedy about stupidity).

Comment: Re:Contradiction in article summary (Score 1) 185

by TheRaven64 (#49385605) Attached to: Why More 'Star Wars' Actors Don't Become Stars
It's not just the teeth. You particularly notice this if you compare US and UK TV. I find it really hard to tell the actors on US TV apart, particularly the female ones who seem to mostly conform to 2-3 stereotypical appearances. The same is true for the young male ones, though at least there are some older male roles that have distinctive appearances. There are very few ugly actors. Compare this with a BBC drama, where there will be a whole range of physiques.

I find it harms willing suspension of disbelief when watching US shows. I sit there thinking 'really, everyone in this low-income school has a personal trainer and stylist? And these people manage to have perfect hair as soon as they wake up or after running through the mud?' Actually, the UK isn't immune from the last part: Sean Bean in Shape has magic hair that is immune to mud, gunsmoke, and everything else the napoleonic wars can throw at him. No matter how dirty his face and uniform get, his hair always looks as if he's just come from the hairdresser.

+ - AngularJS Releases Version 2.0; Rebranded to CircleJS

Submitted by eldavojohn
eldavojohn (898314) writes "Popular JavaScript client-side MVC framework AngularJS has announced a new release and rebranding after days of hard work and midnight development. Version 1.3 (codenamed AcuteJS) was shortly followed by version 1.4 (codenamed ObtuseJS) and now the project has finally come full circle. "Moving to TypeScript has allowed us to implement four-way data binding between the keyboard and database," the sole developer who devotes 17.2% of his time to maintaining AngularJS said, "a keystroke is now just a few hundred thousand digest cycles away from being stored through your browser to the server — of course your printer will receive a promise." Despite criticism of event listeners triggering other event listeners that then, in turn, trigger the event listeners that triggered them, CircleJS looks to be a forerunner in the race from micro-MVC to nano-MVC architecture."

Comment: Re:Woop Di Do Da! (Score 1) 104

Is there any other technology, besides renewable energy, that makes certain Slashdot readers so darn mad? It's like they would prefer that it just didn't exist.

If you say Apple has 13% of the personal computer market, they're popping corks and doing the peepee dance. If you say a newer technology, solar energy, has reached 5%, while facing enormous geo-political resistance and the enmity of the most powerful corporations in the world, it actually pisses you off for some reason.

I'm curious. What is it about solar energy that spurs such surprising anger among this segment of Slashdot readers? What did solar energy do to you?

Comment: Re:Not so fast (Score 1) 92

by Rei (#49385153) Attached to: World's Largest Aircraft Seeks Investors To Begin Operation

Most people's perception of how airships should behave from holes is wrong, and it's based on their experience with party balloons. The reason for the differences are:

* Party balloons are pressurized - the skin is stretched taught. The skin on airships are loose.
* Skin area (and thus leak rate) scales proportional to the radius squared, while the volume scales proportional to the radius cubed. Airships are many, many orders of magnitude larger than party balloons. Consequently the rate in which gas can leak out of a hope is drastically lower.

Even large holes in airships don't take them down quickly. Even a moderate sized airship can generally continue flying to its destination and then fix the damage and refill there.

Comment: Re:Woop Di Do Da! (Score 2) 105

There are complex issues to wide scail deployment.
First is what I think is a short term political problem. Where the energy industry is fighting the change, and lining the pockets of political parties that are willing to make sure things don't change. Technically solar power is more akin to conservative ideals, as it allows the individual to generate their own power without having to handle what big brother says.
Secondly solar requires consumers to buy in. In terms of price even with tax incentives for my home and usage it is about the same price. So there is a hidden cost for me to find a source and deal with the salesmen trying to find a good deal. So it makes it more expensive then current energy. Other forms of energy you don't need a huge buy in. They buy some land, build a plant and the community has power. Just as long there are more people benifitting from it then who are harmed society is happy.
Third trees. Contrarary to the world view of Americans, we like trees a country that is 50th in population density means a lot of us lives in more rural areas, and our homes have a fair amount of tree cover that we do not want to get rid of.

Comment: Re:Why doesn't Moz acknowledge the market share is (Score 4, Funny) 136

by amicusNYCL (#49382613) Attached to: Firefox 37 Released

You might be right, Firefox does seem to be experiencing a certain level of feature creep and bloat these days. Perhaps Mozilla should think about a new browser, one that is specifically designed to be fast and high-performance, while still adhering to the standards. They could call it Phoenix.

Comment: Re:Government would've jumped on them (Score 4, Insightful) 79

by jellomizer (#49380007) Attached to: Microsoft Considered Giving Away Original Xbox

I think OS/2 biggest failure was poor marketing compared to Microsoft.
I remember the OS/2 Warp commercials. Just a bunch of people sitting around a computer saying how cool it was then a bunch of trippy colors.
They didn't even show the OS.

While Microsoft for its Windows 95 campaign showed the OS and how easy it was to use, and some of the new features that would make you want it.

Apple does the same thing with their products they are trying to push. You have adds where they show the product and how easy it is to use.

Comment: Re:It is (Score 1) 123

by Rei (#49378241) Attached to: SpaceX's New Combustion Technologies

Wow, this is great to hear - I'd never heard of you guys before. :)

And looking at your site, I like what you're doing even more - direct 3d printed aerospikes? Pretty darn cool. What sort of 3d printing tech are you using? Have you looked into the new hybrid laser spraying / CNC system that's out there (I forget the manufacturer)? The use of high velocity dust as source material gives you almost limitless material flexibility and improved physical properties that you can't get out of plain laser sintering, and the combination with CNC yields fast total part turnaround times.

And you're working on turbopump alternatives? Geez, you're playing with all of my favorite things here.... ;)

What sort of launch are you all looking at - is this ground launched (and if so, do you have a near-equatorial site) or air launched? I'd love to see more details about your rockets, what sort of ISP figures you're getting so far, how you're manufacturing your tanks, and on and on. But I guess I'll have to wait just like everyone else ;)

I wish you lots of success! And even if you don't make it, at the very least you'll have added a ton of practical research to the world :)

Comment: Re:A Corollary for Code (Score 1) 215

by TheRaven64 (#49378147) Attached to: Why You Should Choose Boring Technology
Not knowing about trickier parts of a language doesn't mean that you don't use them. I recently discovered some code where experienced C programmers didn't know that signed integer overflow was undefined in C. This meant that the compiler could optimise one of their tests away in a loop (nontrivially, in a way that's difficult to generate a warning for) and turn it into an infinite loop. After a few weeks, their code would hit this case and infinite loop and freeze. Unless you know that this tricky part of the language exists, you don't know enough to avoid using it.

Comment: Re:More... (Score 1) 215

by TheRaven64 (#49378133) Attached to: Why You Should Choose Boring Technology
The original justifications for hating goto referred to a non-local goto (or, exceptions, as the kids call them these days) which made it very difficult to reason about control flow in a program. The new reasons for hating goto in language like C/C++ relate to variable lifetimes and making it difficult to reason about when variables go out of scope.

Never worry about theory as long as the machinery does what it's supposed to do. -- R. A. Heinlein

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