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Comment Re:Dealers cannot die soon enough (Score 1) 207

you think Kia wants to open up their own showrooms at malls across america? I assure you not.

Hey, if Kia doesn't want to sell directly to me - Tesla does. I have no problem with both business models competing with one another.

I do, however, have a problem with needing to deal with middle-men because of protectionist laws that forbid companies like Tesla from selling directly to me. But hey, YMMV, right?

Comment Re:Less service? (Score 1) 207

Granted I don't know much about cars, but don't eletric cars still need winter tires, aren't there still moving parts that needs oil, etc?

You only need winter tires if you're in a location that experiences winter. Even then, for most of the USA good quality all-seasons* are more than sufficient. You still need to replace them though.

Yes, there's generally still 'lots' of oil in an electric vehicle. However, the reason engine oil needs to be replaced so often is heat and contamination. The heat breaks down the oil eventually, and the byproducts of combustion contaminate it, which is why you need a filter.

The oil in a properly operating EV never gets that hot though, and is thus treated more like gear oil - so it's like the oil in your transmission, gear boxes, etc... Which is generally changed out far less often.

Regular maintenance items an EV needs: Tires, wipers, wiper fluid, cabin air filter, lights, etc...
Regular maintenance that an EV doesn't need: Engine oil, coolant, brake pads*, air filter, spark plugs, etc...
Maintenance that's more expensive on an EV: Replacing the battery, but costs are coming down 'quickly'.

*EVs still have brake pads, but regenerative braking cuts their usage enough that a pad designed to last around a decade for a regular vehicle lasts the lifetime of an EV.

*Disclaimer: ~2" of snow and today I had to push a woman in a tiny car who had gotten stuck in the middle of the road because she was driving on half-worn 'all seasons' that were 90% summer tire.

Comment Re:Easy solution (Score 4, Informative) 207

Which state would that be, as the ACs mention?
From wiki:

In the United States, direct manufacturer auto sales are prohibited in almost every state by franchise laws requiring that new cars be sold only by dealers.

Customer Experience
According to one survey, more than half of dealership customers would prefer to buy directly from the manufacturer, without any monetary incentives to do so. An analyst report of a direct sales model is estimated to cut the cost of a vehicle by 8.6%.[11] This implies an even greater demand currently exists for a direct manufacturer sales model. However, state laws in the United States prohibit manufacturers from selling directly, and customers must buy through a dealer.

Comment Re:Many a young engineer.... (Score 2) 82

... every schematic drawn by every semiconductor engineer got the arrow backwards.

As I heard it, The arrow is "backward" because Benjamin Franklin, when doing his work unifying "vitreous" and "resinous" electricity as surplus and deficit of a single charge carrier (and identifying the "electrical pressure" later named "voltage"), took a guess at which corresponded to a surplus of a movable charge carrier. He had a 50% chance to assign "positive" to the TYPICAL moving charge carrier in the situations being experimented with (charge transfer by friction between different substances, currents in metallic conductors, and high voltage discharges in air and water-in-air aerosols) and happened to guess "wrong".

Thus we say electrons have a negative charge, "classical current" corresponds to the sum of the flow of moving positive charge minus the flow of negative charge (i.e. the negative of the electron current, which is all there is in normal-matter metallic conductors), the arrowhead on diodes (and junction transistors) points in the direction of classical current across a junction, and so on.

But though it's the charge carrier in metallic conduction and (hard) vacuum tubes, the electron ISN'T the only charge carrier. Even in the above list of phenomena, positive ion flow is a substantial part of electrical discharge currents in air - static sparks and lightning. Positive moving charge carriers are substantial contributors to current as you get to other plasma phenomena and technologies - gas-filled "vacuum" tubes (such as thyratons), gas an LIQUID filled "vacuum" tubes (ignatrons), gas discharge lighting, arc lighting, arc welding, prototype nuclear fusion reactors, ...

Move on to electrochemistry and ALL the charge carriers are ions - atoms or molecular groups with an unequal electron and proton count, and thus a net charge - which may be either positive or negative (and you're usually working wit a mix of both).

And then there's semiconductors, where you have both electrons and "holes" participating in metallic conduction. Yes, you can argue that hole propagation is actually electron movement. But holes act like a coherent physical entity in SO many ways that it's easier to treat them as charge carriers in their own right, with their own properties, than to drill down to the electron hops that underlie them. For starters, they're the only entity in "hole current" that maintains a long-term association with the movement of a bit of charge - any given electron is only involved in a single hop, while the hole exists from its creation (by an electron being ejected from a place in the semiconductor that an electron should be, by doping or excitation, leaving a hole) to their destruction (by a free electron falling into them and releasing the energy of electron-hole-pair separation). They move around - like a charge carrier with a very short (like usually just to the next atom of the solid material) mean free path.

For me the big tell is that they participate in the Hall Effect just as if they were a positive charge carrier being deflected by a magnetic field. The hall voltage tells you the difference between the fraction of the current carried by electrons excited into a conduction band and that carried by holes - whether you think of them as actual moving positive charge carriers or a coordinated hopping phenomenon among electrons that are still in a lower energy state. Further, much of interesting semiconductor behavior is mediated by whether electrons or holes are the "majority carrier" in a given region - exactly what the hall effect tells you about it.

So, as with many engineering phenomena, the sign for charge and current is arbitrary, and there are both real and virtual current carriers with positive charge. Saying "they got it wrong" when classical current is the reverse of electron current is just metallic/thermionic conduction chauvinism. B

Comment Re:If I read this right (Score 1) 439

1) Jesus brought a new covenant, so yes we ignore the stuff from the old testament.

2) Jesus was using a metaphor. There are tons of them in the bible (did you know the Kingdom of God isn't literally a mustard seed?! Huh!). You'll notice also HE brought the (metaphorical) sword. He did not give it to his followers, and he never used it. He strictly forbade his followers from using the physical sword.

Now tell me how many people Mohamed murdered and crucified? This is the horror of multiculturalism: you cannot tell the difference between christianity and its exact opposite islam.

Because of this, the Mohammedans, who do not give a shit about your whiny multicultural bullshit will behead you and rape your women. I'll be fine though. Even in ISIS lands they're not killing Christians so long as they pay the jizya.

Comment Re:Vacuum tubes handle EMP's better (Score 1) 82

"No point progressing since the bombs are gonna fall any day now. Then where will your fancy silicon highways and databases be?"

Given that the Internet Protocol and much of the rest of the networking technology that still underpins the Internet were developed as part of a cold-war program to create a communication system that could survive a nuclear attack that destroyed most of it, and still reorganize itself to pass messages quickly, efficiently, and automatically among any nodes that still had SOME path between them, your post seems to come from some alternate universe to the one I inhabit.

Comment Re:If I read this right (Score 1) 439

You forgot that one important factor: Islam. Of course you can't even say it because the official religion of the US is multiculturalism, the belief that "no beliefs" is the One True Belief and that all other beliefs are both inferior and equivalent. Hence, no one can ever say "just maybe, wrong and stupid christians don't go nuts because their book says "love your enemy" but muslims do because their book says "slay the infidels.""

Instead we're just going to sit around while muslims keep killing people and then tsking about how the problem is "religion."

"Help Mr. Wizard!" -- Tennessee Tuxedo