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Comment: Re:New York has commissions for everything (Score 1) 57

by drinkypoo (#47437233) Attached to: Lyft's New York Launch Halted By Restraining Order

ahhhh so *thats* why Texans are so fucking fat.

No. No it is not. It's because they have amazing food down there. In California, 9/10ths of all restaurants are total fucking shit food with total fucking shit service. I can outcook them any and every day of the week, and I do, and I have no formal training whatsoever. In Texas, 9/10ths of all restaurants are at least basically competent. I think it's because Texans will tell you just what they think of you, and all the incompetents have fled for California, or committed suicide.

It's also because it's stupid hot, and you can't go outside.

Put the two together and you have a lot of driving from restaurant to restaurant with precious little fat-burning in between. That's what happened to me, anyway. Gained 100 lbs in a year and a half. The weight's off now, but ugh.

If you couldn't step outside without tripping over a chicken fried steak, you'd be fat, too.

Comment: Re:Why are the number of cabs [artificially] limit (Score 1) 57

by drinkypoo (#47437221) Attached to: Lyft's New York Launch Halted By Restraining Order

1) Do you really want two-ton land missiles driven by desperate people who are driven to cut corners to stay competitive?

You mean like taxicab drivers? No. We should do away with them immediately.

More generally, as you noted, a competitive market is a swim-or-sink situation. That means profit margins will get razor-thin. That sounds awesome until you realize that wages are also a form of profits.

So your argument against permitting people to hire their services is that it will threaten others' wages? Congratulations, you just cast your vote for no progress ever. Please move back into a cave, and give up your PC.

Comment: Re:riders "at risk" with Lyft (Score 1) 57

by drinkypoo (#47437215) Attached to: Lyft's New York Launch Halted By Restraining Order

So your argument for more taxis on the roads is that the current amount of taxis is already dangerous...

No, and only a someone who does not understand English at all could possibly come to that conclusion without being a prevaricating prickwad. They complained about the nature, not the number.

Cabbies drive like fuckheads because they have no competition, because of bullshit protectionist restraint of trade.

Comment: Re:Problem traced (Score 1) 32

I wonder what happened to the habit of making embedded systems simple and transparent...

I remember some 20 years ago a friend of mine was telling me that sooner or later, your microwave would have a whole operating system on it, even though it only performed simple tasks. It was already cheaper even then to use a MCU over discrete logic for many devices which were not staggeringly complex. It's about development time. As long as we fail to demand quality, we will continue to get what is convenient to produce in quantity. Pity about quality.

Comment: Re:Happy to let someone else test it (Score 1) 87

by Just Some Guy (#47435609) Attached to: First Release of LibreSSL Portable Is Available

Failure to provide work arounds will inherently limit adoption of the project.

I'm certain the OpenBSD guys have literally never cared a single bit. Their goal is to make a secure, clean, and open codebase that people can use and build upon. Anything beyond it simply existence is a bonus.

Comment: Re:Hi speed chase, hum? (Score 1) 365

by StikyPad (#47433783) Attached to: The First Person Ever To Die In a Tesla Is a Guy Who Stole One

A) Police can't initiate a high speed chase without someone that's already fleeing at high speed.
B) The police stopped chasing him.
C) He kept fleeing!

"Approaching" 100MPH is what many people do on the way to work every day where the speed limits are 75, and Tesla's should easily be able to handle that speed. Definitely operator error all the way in this case.

Comment: Re:Good. Let's go. (Score 1) 164

I'll believe that when I see a process for refining the raw materials in orbit and producing something usable out of them. As is, asteroid mining endeavors are nothing short of magical thinking.

So nothing is real or possible before you see it? Why not kill yourself now, then? After all, tomorrow may never come.

People smarter than you (or I) believe that mining asteroids is not only possible but even feasibly. That doesn't mean that it is, of course. It only means that I have no reason to give a shit what you think about asteroid mining.

Comment: Re:sounds like North Korea news (Score 2) 104

by StikyPad (#47431233) Attached to: Google's Experimental Newsroom Avoids Negative Headlines

In that case:

Bad News! Google to stop showing bad news!

In a terrible decision that requires a call-to-arms, Google has decided to censor anything bad. Stop everything you are doing and take to the streets while coordinating through social media, and let your voices and/or rioting be heard! Only when Google mentions the protests in their news feed will can claim success!

The Media

Google's Experimental Newsroom Avoids Negative Headlines 104

Posted by Soulskill
from the giant-earthquake-provides-thousands-with-early-access-to-afterlife dept.
theodp writes: After Brazil's dramatic World Cup defeat by Germany, writes NPR's Aarti Shahani, Google's experimental newsroom focused on search trends that didn't rub salt in Brazil's wounds, choosing to not publish a single trend on Brazilian search terms. Copywriter Tessa Hewson said they were just too negative. "We might try and wait until we can do a slightly more upbeat trend." It's a decision that puzzles Shahani, but producer Sam Clohesy explained, "a negative story about Brazil won't necessarily get a lot of traction in social." In old-school newsrooms, if it bleeds, it leads. But because this new newsroom is focused on getting content onto everyone's smartphone, marketing expert Rakesh Agrawal says, editors may have another bias: to comb through the big data in search of happy thoughts.

Comment: Re:Clear Cut Collusion (Score 1) 72

by drinkypoo (#47430527) Attached to: Google, Dropbox, and Others Forge Patent "Arms Control Pact"

It's a cartel. Put together to ensure the companies in that cartel are safe from patents from one another, while they will continue to use them against companies not in their cartel.
[...]
If this isn't illegal, it bloody well should be.

OK. Tell that to MPEG-LA. By your definition it's a cartel plus extortion. Have fun with that.

"Lead us in a few words of silent prayer." -- Bill Peterson, former Houston Oiler football coach

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