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Comment: Re:they will defeat themselves (Score 1) 942

by Marxist Hacker 42 (#47945061) Attached to: ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

I was going to respond only to your first paragraph, but your last paragraph proves what I'm about to say.

Abstinence education can work, when you encourage critical thinking along with it and do not try to use ignorance to protect innocence. I took what I learned after I was married in Catholic NFP classes, and am using it to teach my special needs son about sex. Being well aware that his body will outpace his mind and critical thinking skills on this issue, I started early with my form of abstinence education- about age 5. Now at 11, he is both protective of his own eyes (hiding during certain scenes in Big Bang Theory, a show he otherwise enjoys) and protective of other people's modesty (necessary, since mommy runs a daycare) . He's already run into homosexuality at school, and handled it by coming to adults with the issue rather than attempting to dissuade a rather aggressive same-age predator on his own.

I have no doubt whatsoever that by high school, he'll be a leader, not a follower, when it comes to sex, and will be armed with the ability to make the correct decision when it comes to abstinence before marriage.

But only because we've talked about it, and because I've been honest.

Comment: Re:This is so 2012. (Score 1) 92

by Rei (#47944167) Attached to: Dremel Releases 3D Printer

Oh, and in #2, sound insulation would also be very important, both for the compressor (if compressed air is used, rather than bottled oxygen) and for the jet itself (which is basically like a tiny rocket engine). And I guess the filter isn't just about removing any incomplete combustion products from the exhaust, but also any dust or the like.

Even if it ultimately isn't suited for, say, a quiet home office, 3d printing isn't really an home office task, we're more talking about a "garage workshop" sort of thing. I'm just curious whether anyone has pursued such an approach, because at a glance it sure looks to have potential for making a very broadly capable product. I mean, such a system should even be capable of printing electronics, including resistors, capacitors, etc, maybe even some types of batteries (not anything requiring extreme precision, like a CPU, and li-ion batteries would be right out due to the thin, sensitive and rather complex membrane needed, there's no way you could just deposit that, but still..).

Comment: Re:Maybe we if stopped giving Africa food (Score 1) 280

by dave420 (#47944105) Attached to: New Study Projects World Population of 11B by 2100

The problems with Africa are directly born from the west's meddling. Redrawing borders, destroying institutions, creating new ones bent on serving the west, stealing minerals & raw materials, working the native people in to the ground or stealing them. The list goes on. It's massive. Pretending the repercussions of that aren't still being felt - and being felt hard - is pathetic.

Your impression about Africa is nothing but a bunch of racist nonsense. It's not cultural, but educational. Just go look at places in Africa where education is being made available, and you'll mysteriously notice your "cultural" shortcomings disappearing. Weird, huh?

I used to think you were pretty cool, but apparently I was wrong. You're either intellectually lazy or a racist - neither is particularly becoming.

Comment: Re:Oh Canada! (Score 1) 280

by dave420 (#47944079) Attached to: New Study Projects World Population of 11B by 2100

Just a friendly aside: Every time you make a joke about confusing "global warming" or "climate change", you aren't making a criticism (just or not) of the science or even the politics, you are merely telling everyone you don't really understand the terms. Let me help:

Global Warming: The increasing of the average temperature of the planet
Climate Change: The changes to the climate caused by the increase in energy in the climate.

Two different, but related, phenomena.

Comment: Re:This is so 2012. (Score 1) 92

by Rei (#47944031) Attached to: Dremel Releases 3D Printer

There's two types of processes that I'm surprised I've not seen more focus on.

1) Printing of, and then filling of molds, which can then be melted down and reused. That's how the higher-end 3d printed parts that you can buy online made, including almost all 3d-printed metal parts you get from online 3d printing services (the extra steps for metal being to coat the mold in a ceramic shell and melt away the mold). The only commercial 3d-printed metal that I'm aware of that doesn't work in this manner is iMaterialize's titanium, which uses laser sintering - and it has an out-of-this-world price tag.

It seems to me that if you used a mold, while in several ways it complicates the process (extra steps, preventing adherence to the molded object, etc), in others, it simplifies it. Your print heads don't need to handle a variety of materials or produce a pretty or durable product. They still need to be able to produce fine surface details but the ability to print thin structures loses importance. Once you've got a mold, you open up the floodgates to the sort of products you can fill it with, anything that will harden either through cooling or via chemical reaction, anything from thermoset plastics to candy.

(note I'm not envisioning a little hobby home printer that fills molds with molten metal in your office, mind you... although I could envision a more garage-scale or small industrial scale version that could handle such a task)

2) I've never even heard of a 3d printer being based on thermal spraying. With thermal spraying, you can choose the balance of precision vs. flow rate via nozzle size. Your materials are virtually unlimited, pretty much anything you can turn into a powder. It could conceivably even let you work with metals in a home environment, if the rate was kept low enough that heat buildup wouldn't be a problem (and you'd want an air filter on the exhaust, even though it should be pretty clean). You can choose the temperature and velocity you're spraying at by varying the pressures of compressed air and combustible fuel fed into the chamber with the powder, so you can work both with heat-sensitive and heat-requisite materials, as well as materials that can't stand high velocity impacts and materials that require them. Such a system could likewise do more than just print - it could add and then sectively remove substrates, it could engrave, it could change surface textures by sandblasting/polishing with various materials, it could paint or apply high-performance coatings - pretty much anything you can envision from a device whose fundamental workings are "shoot grains of material of your choosing at a velocity of your choosing (1-1000+m/s) and temperature of your choosing (cold to thousands of degrees)".

In both cases #1 and #2, I'm genuinely curious as to why there's not been more work done with them. Or perhaps there has been work done with them that I'm unaware of? I'm asking as someone who makes and buys 3d printed items online but has never printed one herself.

Comment: Re:How is he incorrect, though? (Score 1) 280

by dave420 (#47944003) Attached to: New Study Projects World Population of 11B by 2100

That's why people have realised to support them in both the short-term and the long-term: Short-term support includes food, medicine, infrastructure, farming help, etc. Long-term support includes more infrastructure, education, health-care, etc.

If you'd thought about this for more than a couple of seconds, you'd not sound like such a callous, ignorant xenophobe.

"Most of us, when all is said and done, like what we like and make up reasons for it afterwards." -- Soren F. Petersen

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