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Comment Re:Boo hoo, just stop rainwater from leaching lead (Score 1) 115

You might not think so, because elemental lead is not water-soluble. However compounds of lead like hydroxides or carbonates are soluble and can form from elemental lead by contact with water, e.g., 2Pb + O2 + 2H2O -> 2 Pb(OH)2.

This is why it's perfectly safe to drink wine from leaded crystal wine glasses, but a bad idea to store wine in a leaded crystal decanter.

Comment Re:That's why I pay to recycle monitors (Score 1) 115

I know that's no guarantee but you do the best you can.

Considering how much you originally paid for your deoxygenated speaker wire, I would say $40 is the least you can do.

Were you to model the price signal with quaternion rotation instead, you would discover that the price signal really can spin around to a perfect 180-degree inversion of "the best you can do", given but a sparse free-energy input of mindless optimism, and a scant few months to capture abandoned area under the curve (and that's not even including the machine learning revolution).

Perhaps capitalism eventually does the right thing, but not until after imbibing all the loose sugar.

First Law of Mice and Men: If something can go wrong, it will go wrong.

Corollary: If something can lead to an easy buck, it will lead to an easy buck.

Unfortunately, all the quaternions in this picture belong to the increasingly neutered EPA.

Comment Re:Boo hoo, just stop rainwater from leaching lead (Score 1) 115

So as long as you keep the lead from escaping into groundwater (could bury them in a landfill with a clay or plastic lining in a big mountain), this is fine. If lead prices are so cheap that it's easier to mine new lead than it is to recycle it from CRT glass,

True, and true, with reservations. Somebody has got to pay for keeping the lead from escaping into groundwater. Should it be everyone, or the people who benefited from the use of the lead?

And if everyone pays, human nature being what it is people will pay to make the problem "go away" without looking too closely at the details, where "go away" includes "making it someone else's problem."

The thing is, if you could completely internalize all those expenses so the cost of dealing with never just "went away", the market would do a fine job of efficiently managing lead and disposal management as a resource. But that doesn't happen naturally, by itself.

Comment Will of the People (Score 2) 92

On Thursday, a Ukrainian man who hatched a plan in 2013 to send heroin to my home and then call the cops when the drugs arrived was sentenced to 41 months in prison for unrelated cybercrime charges. Separately, a 19-year-old American who admitted to being part of a hacker group that sent a heavily-armed police force to my home in 2013 was sentenced to three years probation.

Sergey Vovnenko, a.k.a. "Fly," "Flycracker" and "MUXACC1," pleaded guilty last year to aggravated identity theft and conspiracy to commit wire fraud. Prosecutors said Vovnenko operated a network of more than 13,000 hacked computers, using them to harvest credit card numbers and other sensitive information... A judge in New Jersey sentenced Vovnenko to 41 months in prison, three years of supervised released and ordered him to pay restitution of $83,368.

And now people like this are in charge of our elections.

Comment Re:or Driverless racing (Score 1) 46

People watch racing because there is risk of a crash with humans in the cockpit. People drive in professional racing because there is a risk to themselves. Those things translate into money, jobs, technological advancements in vehicles (performance and safety). Take away the human element and it's like sitting and watching airplanes fly. Interesting for a few visits, but no sustainable market and not really entertaining. Put up a bar and bleacher stand, and it would be mostly empty.

Absolutely correct. It was just a publicity stunt for self-driving cars. It had much less drama than me playing Forza Horizon.

Comment Re:Travel phone (Score 1) 403

You *do* need Facebook to log in to various other services. I used it, until recently, for Tinder, for example.

This doesn't mean you actually have to post stuff on there, or do anything substantive with it besides use it as a login service. The only things I use my FB account for are logins (and not even that at the moment; I have a girlfriend now so I don't log into Tinder now), and being "friends" with a few distant friends and not-so-distant family members who insist on using it. I never post anything.

Comment Re:So many word puppets (Score 1) 898

I'm going to watch and care about Pewdiepie exactly as much as before--namely, not one bit--so the main thing I care about is that the WSJ's doing things

So, you admit that your mention of "black humor" was just horseshit?

However, since you're also going to ignore the point that, once upon a time, investigative journalists would do things exactly like test what you can get through on a place that lets you ask people to do something for 5USD, in favor of insulting me, I see no point in talking to you further.

Citation, mister, "I've spent more time in a library than a retired university professor"?

Comment Re:Shiva Ayyadurai is a fraud. (Score 3, Interesting) 66

Well, it's possible that he's mildly delusional, as most of us are about beliefs about ourselves that we hold dear.

It strikes me that Ayyadurai is in a legal catch-22 situation. Let's suppose for a moment he did "invent" email. That would make him a public figure, and the legal standard used to establish defamation is "actual malice. That's a difficult standard to meet.

I assume Ayyadurai's complaint are claims that he is a "fake" or a "liar". Suppose some random shmoe is interviewing for a job, and you tell the interviewer that he's a "liar". That is defamation, unless you have actual reason to believe he is a liar. But if you say the same thing about a politician running for office, it's NOT defamation unless you have actual reason to believe he is NOT a liar. That's because the politician is a public figure.

It seems to me nearly impossible to defame someone by calling him a liar in the context of his claiming to invent anything. His very demand to be recognized for his achievement makes him a public figure, whether that claim is true or not.

Comment Re:simple (Score 1) 403

I don't have a dropbox account (truthfully), so I can't give that up.

You can claim you don't have a Google account, if you're not carrying an Android phone. Carry a Windows phone and it'll seem believable. With the current popularity of Windows Phones (hehe), you should be able to get one of those really, really cheap now.

Comment Re:Are local managers more destructive ? (Score 3, Interesting) 128

The only reason they can possibly be more productive is that the local management is toxic.

Oh come on. Local management not being toxic is the exception, not the rule. It's a rare workplace where you have really effective and competent management (and I don't mean just one manager, I mean the whole chain; I've had good direct managers, but they were hamstrung by the idiocy directly above them).

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