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Comment Re:The MS Merry Go Round. (Score 1) 211

You're completely wrong here.

If you were talking about a normal, competitive industry like cars, you'd be correct: reliability costs money, and unreliability costs customers. Detroit knows that lesson all too well. Sell someone an unreliable car, and they'll badmouth it and start looking for another car in the same price range with a better reliability reputation. This is why Japanese brands have commanded higher prices than similar American cars for a long time; it takes a lot of time (esp. in the car industry since people keep their cars for years) to fix your reputation. It's even more pronounced in other markets where the products cost less and people don't keep them as long (cars are the second-most expensive items consumers typically purchase, behind houses).

Microsoft does not operate in a competitive industry. If someone thinks Windows 10 is unreliable, what are they going to do? They could buy a Mac, but those are much more expensive than Windows machines; you're not going to get a Mac for $300 or $400. And the Mac won't so easily run their Windows software, unless they run it in a VM (like with Parallels) but then they're still going to have the same unreliability problems since that's really Windows. They could run Linux, but there again you have the software compatibility problem, and on top of that most people don't even know what Linux is. In the enterprise space, it's really worse because even though they have professional IT, those IT pros only know Windows (you'll have to lay off your whole IT department and start from scratch to switch OSes), and they run all kinds of crappy "enterprise" software that only runs on Windows.

So, since the customers aren't going anywhere (except holding out with their older Windows versions as long as possible), what incentive exactly does MS have to invest in reliability? None. It's really a waste of money for them, and hurts their profits. It's better for them to make Windows as shoddy as possible to save money (while not making it completely non-functional because then they can suffer class-action lawsuits, returns, etc.), and keep profitability high while letting the customers suffer with unreliability.

So, since the

Comment Re:Extraordinary claims require ... (Score 1) 163

Indeed. But Occam's Razor only applies to a conclusion's relation to the information you have at hand. It is conceivable that if you collect enough information the same heuristic can lead you in a different direction.

It should be able to confirm his genetic relationship to his putative great-great-great grandchildren, and thus let a lower limit on his age. That and other documentary evidence of him and his descendants could make his age seem plausible. In a world with seven billion people, outliers can be very unusual indeed.

Comment CAD licence (Score 1) 220

The funny thing about humans is that different humans care about different things. (Perhaps this signal becomes harder to detect as an Act III BDFL of a sprawling monoculture.)

If you regard your code as a means to an end (e.g. authoring a great web site) then perhaps it's a perfectly reasonable stance not to "care" about your code the way Linus cares about his code.

Licence of the day: Craftspeople with Attachment Disorder. Be there, or be square.

Comment Re:Too secure for insecure? (Score 1) 528

Cherry picking that there might be one or two emails out there that are still missing

It's not, "one or two". Maybe you missed this part of the story:

However, an untold number of official e-mails from President George W. Bush's era will probably never be recovered because it would be extremely costly to do so, lawyers involved in lawsuits brought by the National Security Archive and Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington said.

Comment Re:It's research... (Score 1) 143

Back in about 2003 my wife and I were contracting to ACS up in Anchorage we drove up to the HAARP site. Can't see anything from the road but got nice pictures of all the nasty military do not enter under penalty of death signs at the gate. HAARP was a really cool project. I would love to get back there and take a walk through it.

Now that I'm older and have a lot of vacation time I want to go see science sites. My next is going to be the LIGO site at Hanford, at least it's just a day trip for me. You can't get more sciency than that!

https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/W...

73 OM, de w7com

Comment Re: It's research... (Score 1) 143

I'm actually crap at code, got my general after no-code. Mostly these days I just play with old Motorola gear I impulsively buy on ebay. My latest project is making an adrino IP to QuickCall II encoder for the pile of Pageboy II pagers that I bought. Not that I have any use for that, it's just something I like to play with. I love the old batwing and Bell System stuff. My work phone is a 5 line Touch-a-matic 32 with the KSU under the desk.. chime bell, of course.

Okay, I'm an odd duck.

73 de w7com

Comment It's hard to believe. (Score 5, Interesting) 104

The amount of data you need assemble a global navigation system is enormous. You don't hire some intern to transcribe data out of Wikipedia, you license it from companies like Tele Atlas.

Now for geographic place names you'd turn to sources like the USGS GNIS system for the US, whatever the local equivalent of GNIS is, or for places that don't have that datasets like GNIS the DoD's Defense Mapping Agency.

It can't possibly be that Bing gets their place/position data mainly from Wikipedia. The only thing I can think is that they did some kind of union of all the geographic name sources they could find in order to maximize the chance of getting a hit on a place name search, and somehow screwed up prioritizing the most reliable sources first.

Comment Re:If you are so sure (Score 1) 271

So the question might be reversed, should everyone with the same job description be paid exactly the same, regardless of work output or experience?

This is a good question. All people inflate their own sense of worth. Workers who claim to work 80 hours a week are often making very different choices about how to manage their time as someone who claims to work 40. It's one half of the Dunning-Kruger effect (the other half being that people of high capability often underestimate the difficulty of what they do).

http://www.apa.org/monitor/feb...

Now I'm not saying that you're exaggerating the amount of work you did in comparison to others (especially those tricksy women, amirite?), but it would be consistent with what we know about human nature and the actual data from the workplace of people who claim to work long hours. Studies have shown that the more hours people claim to work over 55, the more they're exaggerating how many hours they actually work. People who claim to work 75-80 hours a week are usually overestimating by at least 20 hours.

https://www.fastcompany.com/30...

Competence is a complicated thing masquerading as a simple thing. No, people who have the same job title as you shouldn't necessarily make the same amount of money. Your pay is based on performance reviews, training, proven competence and a whole slew of other inputs. The problem is, a lot of those so-called metrics have a built-in bias. And in a salaried workforce, those biases can really run rampant. That's why in countries with healthier, more dynamic economies, you will see pay based on seemingly arbitrary measures like job title and seniority. This was an innovation of the labor movement and led to the most productive workforces in the world.

http://www.epi.org/publication...

I have no doubt that you're a competent, hard-working guy. That's my built-in bias because I like you, Ol Olsoc. A lot of times, we find agreement around here. We have things in common. If I were overseeing a performance review of you, I'd probably be predisposed to rate you highly. I'd certainly be predisposed to rate you more highly than the woman who's been a bitch to me every since I made that joke about the one-eared elephant at Miller's retirement party.

Now, get the picture?

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