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Comment RPG will take that out in a heartbeat. (Score 2) 174

The police wants to escalate to that level, Then the Unrest will also.

Cops with full battle armor are a danger to society, it means the ones that think they need to defend themselves from the police will up their game to a 308 high power hunting rifle that will rip through Military armor like butter, or start using Armor piercing 5.56/7.62 home made rounds.

Want to keep a crowd calm, you don't freaking roll in like storm troopers hell bent on extermination.

In he countries it's built in, RPG's are not hard to come by, hell even a home made IED would take that thing out.

Comment Re:Parity? Really? (Score 1) 490

Do you think the lawyers reading the ACA legislation and the children reading Harry Potter are equal?

I'm pretty sure lawyers' reading skills outpace those of Harry Potter-age children.

Plus, the lawmakers are being very well-compensated to read legislation. It's like their one fucking job, you know?

If Trump and the GOP couldn't unravel the 3500 page health care law, how are they going to pull off reforming the tax code, which ran like twenty-three volumes (without addendums) back in the 1990s? That's not counting the judicial precedents which are now law. Hell, there's like several hundred pages of law that just governs the taxation issues related to owning racehorses.

Comment Re:Take whoever came up with this (Score 1) 142

I've seen IT directors who drive Teslas but who still pocket RAM sticks from the lab.

The problem is, there is zero probability that this new corporate surveillance will be aimed at IT directors.

Because if there's one thing we've learned, it's that if you are rich and you steal, it's considered, "smart". If you're making $35k/yr and you make an unauthorized copy of your tax return on a company xerox machine, you're going to get frog-marched out of the place.

Late-stage capitalism is a cancer.

Comment Re:Neglect is more likely (Score 1) 102

Nearly right. The "South Vietnamese" government was an illegal and illegitimate device conjured up by Washington to justify its violent intervention. There was a nation called Vietnam. After international talks, an election was scheduled for Vietnam. Washington decided that the Communists were certain to win the election, so it engineered a "rebellion" by a newly-invented entity called "South Vietnam". Insofar as it ever existed, South Vietnam must have seceded from Vietnam, just as Washington maintains

That's a very good summary.

Comment Re:Block on the phone. (Score 2) 76

I like the idea of moving as much decision making as possible to the phone, but I don't want a whitelist. That would require me to make the effort to whitelist people, plus having the prescient power of anticipating which strangers I want to hear from (e.g. whoever found my dog and called the number on her collar). I'm ok with getting a call from a stranger, as long as their "return address" isn't forged. If the return address is correct, and they are annoying, I can blacklist 'em. Allowing strangers to call me is the best default. Not perfect (it's easy to imagine some failure scenarios), but best.

Comment Re:So what? (Score 1) 397

This just removes the fig leaf. .. Anyone who's serious about security wouldn't rely on the ISP being on their side-- one would already be using strong encryption etc. for all communication if one were actually concerned about security.

This really is the best way to look at things.

If people want "privacy laws" then those laws shouldn't be about what's not allowed to happen; the laws need to be about what is required to happen (the goal being to encourage common sense practices, because nobody can protect your privacy for you.). Make it so that businesses and people can't access government's network services without going through a darknet, for example. Do not allow any plaintext email communication with the government. Put into "REAL ID" that the issuing authority also has to sign the identified person's key and include the fingerprint on the ID card. Don't allow government money to be spent on computers containing any software which can't be audited and maintained. And so on.

Don't make anyone protect their privacy overall, but do make it so that they have to pay lip service to common sense in any interaction with government (and then let convenience and economy of scale take it from there; lazy people will then do the right thing). Or, just don't have privacy laws since, obviously, we don't really care. Pick one or the other.

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