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Comment Re:where is your brain? (Score 1) 125

Are you actually asserting that demand is level 24 hours a day?

It can come very close.

In California, for example, a very large part of the demand is pumping water through aquaducts. By placing reservoirs along the way and doing most of the pumping during times of low electrical demand, California electrical utilities used to be able to keep the power demand nearly constant - and can still keep it much more level than in many other places.

Also: Coal plants can provide baseload, while wind and solar together do a great job of shaving peaks: Higher wind corresponds to higher HVAC load as well as higher generation. Solar not only tracks the air conditioning requirements but also comes close to tracking the daily load peaking - and solar plus wind tracks it even better, since the lake effect makes an afternoon-through-evening hump in wind generation.

at a power output proportional to the CUBE of the windspeed.

is this relevant somehow?

Yes, very. The steeply up-bending curve means that wind generators that are able to make use of high winds - which only happen for a tiny fraction of the time - have a peak power rating far above the average power they are able to produce in normal winds. So the peak power vastly overstates their average contribution.

Comment Re:Let me know when ... (Score 4, Insightful) 125

The power can be stored,

The issue is not that the power can be stored.

The issue is that power capacity comparisons overstate the total amount of energy you get out of the renewable generation equipment over the long haul because coal generation can run near capacity all the time and renewables (excluding water power) only a small part of the time.

I'm quite supportive of renewable energy. (I'm a major participant on one of the renewable energy tech discussion boards, too.) But while it's very GOOD that renewable power has passed coal in power capacity, even with near-ideal load-levelling storage, it will take about another factor of three before it surpasses coal in providing usable energy to the loads.

Comment Let me know when ... (Score 1, Insightful) 125

... they overtake coal for amount generated per unit time.

Renewables may have higher total peak, but coal plants have level output and can run 24/7, while sun is only about a third of the day and wind varies with the weather - at a power output proportional to the CUBE of the windspeed.

Comment Re:It's worse than that (Score 1) 530

Are they being scared by frat-boy brogrammers (who aren't even real programmers)?

No, they are being scared of by other women and a press that insists the industry in rampant with sexism - even though that's really only the case in an isolated cluster in California (there you have a massive problem, but it's not like it affects most people).

I have to wonder how many women (just like so many brogrammers!) only picked programming or other STEM majors thinking it was 1) easy, 2) easy money, and 3) easy excitement,

From personal experience that number is zero, absolutely no women picked the field because of "easy money", since after all programming is really not that easy to begin with and it takes a while sometimes before you start earring a lot of money.

It's also evident from just a few classes exactly how much "excitement" there is; none. Unless you get excited about programming then hey, it IS exciting just in a different way... for some women (and men) that is the case and they are happy.

Comment Why not just keep using Esc then? (Score 1) 446

For anywhere Esc makes sense, it would obviously still be present, just not a "real" key (though that does not mean no feedback when pressed).

However I think it's absurd to say chording is not ergonomic, there is no twisting involved to use Shift with other keys to do selection, or to hit Ctrl-A to move to the start of the line. In fact if anything your hand benefits from mild occasional stretching.

Submission + - Apple removes ESC key new Macbook "Pro" (theverge.com) 2

fyngyrz writes: The Mac "Pro's" ESC key, used by many at the console / shell level, has apparently succumbed to overwhelming... courage. Er, design intent. Yeah, that's it. You have to admit, Apple is brave. No console-friendly person will be happy with this. I suspect that will be true to a degree where they'll be happy with... something other than a Macbook "Pro." BTW, those aren't "scare" quotes. Those are "no, wrong word" quotes. I could have gone with "pro[sic]", but... oy. Oh. And hey. You didn't want function keys, did you? Of course not... Okay, one hopes these missing features will at least sometimes, possibly, appear on the new touch bar, there to blunt the ends of your fingers as they use a key-striking habit to stomp on a touch surface.

Comment Should lead to more use of function row (Score 1) 446

XCode uses F-Keys,

Sure but all of those F-Keys will be back as clearer named keys on the touch bar. Which even better could change between editing source code vs. using IB vs CoreData modeling tool... nothing like a key to shift bounding boxes to match constraints!

I think that will lead to more use of the function row for me. I also use Xcode for most the day, and I have to say I have never used the F keys at all because I simply have never taken the time to understand what they are mapped to - I use a lot of other key-combos with Xcode, just not those keys.

Comment Right because Apple has no experience with touch.. (Score 1) 446

Only some vague, wispy area to touch which one hopes will do what they want but will, as time and experience has shown, fail at every given opportunity.

Actually what experience has shown is that Apple gets Touch right, every time.

For years Apple has the only laptop trackpad I could stand using.

For years now Apple has made touch the singular way people interact with mobile devices - one that work at every opportunity, not fail...

Apple has also been doing an excellent job of integrating haptic feedback with touch, on both the Apple Watch and newer trackpads along with the iPhone.

So all signs point to a haptic-feedback touch bar with great responsiveness and accuracy... certainly not the grim picture you paint.

I personally am really looking forward to having function keys I never used replaced by clean commands in most apps I certainly will use. It's like gaining an extra row of keys, not losing anything.

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