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Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 294

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 200

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment The issue isn't (just) speed - it's (also) range. (Score 1) 43

LTE is already pretty darn fast, so losing a little performance isn't going to make that big of a deal. It's not as if you can torrent to your hearts content without killing your cell phone bill.

The issue isn't just speed. It's also range.

At any given speed, the Qualcom can support it at substantially lower signal levels. 6ish dB in a lot of cases, a bit less in some, enormously more in others.

Look at the graphs in TFA. In addition to some specific pathologies that penalize the Intel chip farther, the bulk of the graph has the drop off looking similar but with the Qualcom shfited 5 or 6 dB to the right. (Those squares are 5 dB wide.)

6 dB is four times the effective signal strength, which corresponds to twice the range. That maps into four times the area served at that speed from a single cell tower (important in sparsely-served areas), deeper penetration into buildings and the like (in more heavily-covered areas). It can also map into more data pushed before a given area and channel allocation's bandwidth is saturated. 3 dB corresponds to twice the effective signal strength, 1.4ish times the radius, twice the area served.

If the modems were equivalent and the problem just the layout of the board and antenna, you'd expect the two curves to be the same shape but just offset. The shape is substantially different, so (board issues or not) something else is going on.

Comment Skyrim is a 2011 game though (Score 1) 259

I mean nothing wrong with having it on the platform, but it isn't exactly the pinnacle of modern tech. It was released in 2011, and the console versions were designed to target systems with 512MB of RAM (unified for the 360, 256/256 system/GPU for the PS3) at 1280x720@30fps. That was fairly low spec then, since the consoles were old (remember Oblivion released in 2006 as one of the first flight titles on the Xbox 360) and is really low spec now. It wouldn't at all surprise me if my Shield Tablet could handle it easily. It has more RAM, and its GPU seems to be at least as powerful as the 360/PS3 era stuff.

So while there's nothing wrong with Nintendo getting games like this, it isn't really some major win, or proof of a high spec system. We saw the same kind of thing happen with the Wii U where it got games that previously the Wii hadn't because of a lack of power.

The issue in the long run is that being too low spec can exclude games from being released on your platform. While people like to claim "graphics don't matter" they do and they sell games. That aside, there are a lot of things you could want to put in a game that will require more memory, more CPU, more GPU and so on. Developers aren't always going to be interested in either compromising on what they want to make, or producing a cut-down version to target the lower spec hardware.

Comment Re:Remote exploit (Score 1) 71

Most attacks these days are a sequence of memory safety violation followed by memory disclosure followed by arbitrary code execution. ASLR is meant to make the memory disclosure part harder, but there are now half a dozen known attack techniques that allow ASLR to be bypassed. Off the shelf attack toolkits will include these mechanisms, so it's a mistake to assume that an attacker won't be able to bypass it. It increases the barrier to entry from script kiddie with 5-year-old toys to script kiddie with new toys.

Comment Re:Holy flamebait batman! (Score 1) 885

If you don't have a job, "relocation" is a bus ticket. But very few people move to improve their circumstances.

Not true. If you don't believe me, look at the statistics for worker mobility - they correlate strongly with wealth. Poor people are a lot more reliant on their support networks (family, friends, and so on). If they're in a poorly paying job, then they probably can't afford to take a month to look for a new one in the new location (especially with the real possibility that they won't find one). If they don't have a job, then there's a strong psychological pressure not to move to places with fewer jobs and there's likely to be a delay in receiving unemployment benefit as these things are typically administered locally.

In contrast, someone like a typical Slashdot poster can afford to stay in a hotel room for a week or two (or have an employer willing to pay the cost) while they look for somewhere to live and will typically be able to find a job before they start moving.

Oh, if we're willing to tax the first dollar of earnings (over the UBI), it's far more credible. But right now the majority pays effectively no income tax, so that would be a massive change.

UBI itself is a massive change, so it's weird to think that you'd introduce it without introducing massive changes. Most proposals for UBI have it replace the tax-free allowance. You might have a very small tax-free allowance on top of it, but generally the way of balancing the books involves paying tax on all earned income.

Comment Re:Holy flamebait batman! (Score 1) 885

But the good ones are either simply not there anymore because they left, or they are not working in coding outsourcing because it pays badly

That's not quite true. The problem is that most Indian outsourcing firms are really crap places to work. They have huge staff turnover (as in, close to 100% over the course of a month). If you set up an office in Bangalore, have a mixture of people who moved out there and know your company and locals who know the environment, then you can still hire a lot of competent people. You'll probably be paying them a few times more than the local outsourcing sweatshops, but it's still cheap. You can also do the same thing on a smaller scale if you work with individuals and build a long-term relationship (pay them a 10-20% of a Silicon Valley salary and they'll have a standard of living vastly better than they'd get if they moved to the USA, so there's no big incentive for them to leave India and their family / friends).

But if you go with one of the big outsourcing outfits, or just do short-term contracts, you're likely to get either people who don't have the skills, or ones that do but will be gone before the end of the project because they've got a much better offer from somewhere else.

Comment Re:Trump is fine with gay marriage... (Score 3, Informative) 617

I think you're mischaracterising Trump. It's more fair to say he's the "candidate who says what I hate and will certainly try to do it". Unlike Clinton, he doesn't have the backing of the Washington machine and has managed to alienate both parties. Both Clinton and Trump are likely to push policies that are counter to the interests of the majority of the population, the difference is that Clinton is more likely to succeed.

Comment Re:Holy flamebait batman! (Score 1) 885

Problem is, the math doesn't work. Lets say we pay out 100% of current federal revenue as UBI (setting aside the fact we'd still need Medicare etc). That's just over $10,000 per citizen. Is that even a subsistence wage?

In a lot of the country, yes. UBI would likely be accompanied by a redistribution of people. Currently, poor people are the least mobile: they aren't being headhunted by companies willing to pay relocation costs and they aren't able to speculatively move somewhere with lower costs of living and hope that there will be jobs waiting. With UBI, they would be able to guarantee that they'd have that $10K/year wherever they were and move to places where it would give them a higher standard of living.

You're also assuming that you'd be giving everyone a net increase of $10K/year. I'd expect that under a workable UBI proposal I'd have a bit less take-home income because my tax rate would go up slightly.

Comment Re:Holy flamebait batman! (Score 1) 885

Tell that legend to the people who have jobs in the Bay Area but cannot afford to live there

Here's a secret: a lot of Bay Area companies will happily pay 80% of a Bay Area salary for competent people to live somewhere where the cost of living is 10% that of the Bay. They're happy, because they're paying you less than if you were local (even if they're paying for a few of you to rent an office, the cost will be a tiny fraction of the expense of a desk in the Bay Area). You're happy because your take-home pay is vastly more (and you don't have to live in the Bay Area).

Tell that to techs finding their entry level jobs simply don't exist any more.

That's really the problem, and it's been a problem for well over a decade (and not just in IT-related fields): companies want to hire experienced people, they don't want to hire inexperienced people and train them.

Comment Ahh yes, the most accurate source of infomration (Score 1) 312

The AC who posts doomsday scenarios with absolutely no sources :P.

Seriously man, if you think this crap you are peddling is real, then some sources please. If not then fuck off.

I'd imagine the reason you don't is because, of course, the real story is far less dramatic than you make it out to be. NatWest is closing RT's account why is not known, as they haven't said. There is no "at the behest of the US" reported anywhere. They also aren't doing anything dodgy like seizing funds, they've notified RT "We don't want to do business with you anymore," and they will close the account down next month.

Here's a source, since you can't be bothered: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-...

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