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Comment Reading it wrong (Score 1) 46

You guys are reading this wrong. This isn't a, "Wow, Windows 10 is so cool," article, this is a, "Wow, Microsoft has managed to force more people to upgrade faster than they did going from XP to Windows 7." And in that regard, yes, Microsoft has mastered that one aspect of the game much better than they did in the past.

Comment Re:A quick breakdown (Score 1) 46

As someone who makes and customizes retail software, I can tell you that existing POS registers will NEVER upgrade from XP. That's right, XP. Not even Windows 7. And the reason is because it just works, and the hardware requirements are so low. New ones coming out will likely have a stripped down version of 10 for retail, but there's no such animal as "upgrading POS registers to Windows 10".

Comment Re:And how many (Score 1) 46

I've got Win7 on my main desktop machine and on a number of VMs, and there is no way in hell I'm upgrading them. Especially since the latest Windows automatic update killed my laptop over the weekend and I had to get MSI's tech support involved to get it running again (thanks guys!). Microsoft can upgrade all my machines when it can pry Win7 from my cold dead hands... bastards...

Comment Possible (Score 3, Interesting) 177

First, I'm sure there's lots of Open Source being used in Google's implementation - just not where we can see.

There is a speech recognizer from CMU that might be a good starting point. I haven't heard about plain-language software, though. There is additional rocket science to be done. Not insurmountable given things we've already done.

Training with millions of people? Actually, that's the part that community development is good at.

Submission + - Brian Krebs is back online, with Google Cloud Hosting (krebsonsecurity.com)

Gumbercules!! writes: After the massive 600mbps DDOS on http://krebsonsecurity.com/ last week that forced Akamai to withdraw the (pro-bono) DDOS protection they offered the site, krebsonsecurity.com is now back online, hosted by Google.

Following Brian Krebs breaking an article on vDOS (https://developers.slashdot.org/story/16/09/08/2050238/israeli-ddos-provider-vdos-earned-600000-in-two-years), leading to the arrest of the two founders, his site was hit with a record breaking DDOS. It will certainly be an interesting test of Google's ability to provide DDOS protection to clients.

Comment Re: It's OK to Not Tolerate Inteolerance (Score 1) 631

If you surveyed how many citizens would support law against hate speech, it would probably be a significant number. And prospective citizens as well. So I don't think the problem with your proposal has anything to do with people in favor of shari'a law. It would not work with plain Judeo-Christian European European-descended folks.

Comment Re:So basically... (Score 1) 631

I've met Godwin and he'd be horrified that you are trying to shield Trump by invoking his name. The world doesn't need an automatic method to suppress discussion of atrocities, and Mike never meant what he said to be one. In fact, this is a quote of Mike directly:

If you're thoughtful about it and show some real awareness of history, go ahead and refer to Hitler or Nazis when you talk about Trump. Or any other politician.

Comment Re:It's OK to Not Tolerate Inteolerance (Score 1) 631

Your next move, should you choose to make it, is to decry that if we actually had standards for citizenship (like every other goddamn country on Earth) we'd have to kick out all existing citizens that don't meet those standards, which is ludicrous. No one handles birthright citizenship the same way they handle citizenship through naturalization, and the lack of options for stateless citizens makes that idea cruel and untenable.

With all due respect, you're talking to yourself now. I wasn't thinking of this point at all.

Comment Re:It's OK to Not Tolerate Inteolerance (Score 1) 631

The actual statement is "support and defend the constitution and laws of the United States". Now, obviously, you personally do not approve of every law, nor could anyone even know them all. If you swear "true faith and allegiance" to them you are swearing to follow and uphold the law, not to refrain from opposing it in a peaceful political manner as is supported by that very text. The only way as a citizen that you could actually break the first amendment would be if you were in a government position, because it's directed toward congress rather than the people. So, the typical prospective citizen can swear allegiance to that amendment with complete confidence that they will never be in a position for that to matter.

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