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Comment Memories (Score 3, Insightful) 211

I got my engineering degree with DOS. Everyone was issued a Z100 (non msdos!) with an 8088, Fortran and Basic. Some other programs such as CAD, PC-TeX were available. Russ Nelson worked at my college and created Freemacs, the word processor and the spelling checker and many other utilties in use at Clarkson

Some classes gave you a VMS or Unix account. When it was in heavy use at the end of the semester , it was faster to edit in DOS and upload than to scroll down the file in VMS. The DOS FORTRAN didn't have the extensions or libraries. Sometimes its math wasn't as accurate.

After I got a 286 and had gotten a Unix account (w/ Usenet access), I started trying to learn Unix things. Turbo C, GNUish utilities, Freemacs, Elvis and shell clones helped me. Minix was almost as helpful.

A 486 w/ 8mb lead to Linux replacing DOS and work as a Unix sysadmin. The DOS intro to C, awk, vi, lex, yacc (via "The Unix Programming Environment" was extremely helpful. Linux at home helped me continue learning. It could single task better than my Sparcstation 1+ running SunOS.

The 8088, 80286 and 486 systems probably cost ~ $5k each back in the day where a Unix workstation was ~ $20k if you could get one.

Comment Re:What target platform? (Score 3, Informative) 149

x86_64 and no SPARC.

Believe it or not, Linux is not the end all & be all OS. There are things that other OSes do differently from Linux that might have application for real use cases.

vxWorks is a commercial real time OS uses on the mars rovers. NASA had a reason to choose it.
Contiki is another embedded OS that does things Linux cannot.
OpenBSD does security and code review. Some of it has trickled to other OSes. (W^X)
OSX runs a Mach microkernel with a BSD derived OS.
Minix is still around too.
VMware and Android both use a Linux derived kernel but do not look like Linux.
Even Windows has its place.

I currently work with OpenStack which (mostly) means Linux. I've been using Linux since '92. But I was a Solaris admin until recently and even installed Solaris 11 a few times. There are some things Solaris does better than Linux.

I've found Solaris to be more stable and better at handling loads. I had apps that ran fine on Solaris that crashed Linux on the port.
Dtrace is an awesome tool to see what is really going on with your app. Systemtap might get there.
Zones are secure, reliable containers. It's nice to finally see them get used in Linux. It will be good if they get the security up to the level of Zones.
ZFS, well it's already on FreeBSD and I've been using it for years with ZFS on Linux. I'd like to see btrfs at the same reliability. I wish *every* CLI had as good a UI as ZFS does. I'd love a GUI that was as good!
Solaris switched to SMF from SystemV type startup a long time ago. I liked it better than upstart. Systemd has been a bit smoother than SMF was at first.

Would I use Solaris for a desktop? NO! unless I had no choice. I bet most users stopped using RHEL/CentOS in favor of Ubuntu or something else a long time ago.

Oh, forgot KVM inside Zones for OpenIndiana.

Run Linux on KVM inside a Zone. Use dtrace on your Linux binaries.

Comment Re:why? (Score 1) 149

Solaris is pickier about hardware than Linux.

Hardware gets ported by the vendor to Windows. Sometimes Linux, but there are lots of people that will also do it.
For Macintosh, Apple has to licence a port, but is specific about which hardware is supported. And sells a decent number of units to make it not much more $$ than the Windows version.

Solaris has so few users that the cost of the port for a graphics card doesn't get spread across many units. The driver is the cost. If Oracle doesn't sell the hardware, you will rarely see a driver for it.

Many common (scsi) cards in Solaris had 32 bit support and never got 64 bit support.

If you pick your hardware before you install Solaris, it will likely work very well on Linux.

Comment Re:What target platform? (Score 5, Interesting) 149

x86_64 and no SPARC.

Believe it or not, Linux is not the end all & be all OS. There are things that other OSes do differently from Linux that might have application for real use cases.

vxWorks is a commercial real time OS uses on the mars rovers. NASA had a reason to choose it.
Contiki is another embedded OS that does things Linux cannot.
OpenBSD does security and code review. Some of it has trickled to other OSes. (W^X)
OSX runs a Mach microkernel with a BSD derived OS.
Minix is still around too.
VMware and Android both use a Linux derived kernel but do not look like Linux.
Even Windows has its place.

I currently work with OpenStack which (mostly) means Linux. I've been using Linux since '92. But I was a Solaris admin until recently and even installed Solaris 11 a few times. There are some things Solaris does better than Linux.

I've found Solaris to be more stable and better at handling loads. I had apps that ran fine on Solaris that crashed Linux on the port.
Dtrace is an awesome tool to see what is really going on with your app. Systemtap might get there.
Zones are secure, reliable containers. It's nice to finally see them get used in Linux. It will be good if they get the security up to the level of Zones.
ZFS, well it's already on FreeBSD and I've been using it for years with ZFS on Linux. I'd like to see btrfs at the same reliability. I wish *every* CLI had as good a UI as ZFS does. I'd love a GUI that was as good!
Solaris switched to SMF from SystemV type startup a long time ago. I liked it better than upstart. Systemd has been a bit smoother than SMF was at first.

Would I use Solaris for a desktop? NO! unless I had no choice. I bet most users stopped using RHEL/CentOS in favor of Ubuntu or something else a long time ago.

Comment Re:NetUSB=proprietary. Is there an open replacemen (Score 1) 70

Yes, Linux has USB/IP support. There's a kernel module to handle it on the Linux host, and there's a client driver available for Windows (although I'm not sure how well it works as I've never used it myself).

I had a need to get a USB scanner into a Windows 7 VM that I connected to via RDP. I put Linux USB/IP on a raspberry PI and plugged the scanner in. The Windows box got the client. I could scan. Problem solved.

Comment Re:America (Score 1) 120

What kind of legacy did the native americans leave 2000-3000 years ago to civilisation ? The Romans built roads, acquaducts, conquered the known world, invented Roman Law (that underpins most non common law systems even today). The Chinese had similar accomplishments. The Greeks invented Democracy (although Greek democracy was different from modern day democracies), managed to conquer territories up to India , had great philosophers etc...

Maize. It's probably the greatest example of genetic manipulation in history. Started ~ 10,000 years ago to produce the most productive grain on the planet.

Potato. Wild potato were toxic. Domestication bred less toxic ones. Introduction of the potato into northern Europe helped eliminate famines from the failure of wheat crops.

More recently, the ways and ideas of the native american tribes living in and around the colonists certainly influenced the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution of the United States and The Bill of Rights in the USA.

Comment Re:Upgrade (Score 1) 368

Ah, but the people suggesting moving away from both Microsoft and Apple all run DRM free ogg-vorbis, and like to build their environments from a collection of parts.

The idea of actually using software for an extended period of time and needing it to work with devices is a foreign concept.

If they want music players they build their own using a Raspberry Pi and some chewing gum.

All my music is mp3 so I can put it on any device. My 1st player would play mp3 and WMA but no AAC. I bought CDs and ripped them.

  I ran into issues in the last year syncing on Linux to my iPod (gen 5.5). I had issues copying stuff to it with iTunes too (slow, pain to use). The special DB on an iPod is a pain.

I put Rockbox on the iPod and it doesn't need the special DB that requires iTunes or other special software. Now, I just mount it as a drive and drag my music to it. I can play ogg. I'm not sure about AAC. Everything I rip or buy online I do as mp3s.

  I can also plug it into my work computer (not linux) and play music off it with the software on the computer that is not iTunes.

The newer iPods cannot be converted to Rockbox, you have to use the special DB that has less functions. Why do I want one of those?

Comment Re:There is no cure, but there has been a treatmen (Score 1) 137

I'm red-green colorblind too & wear glasses all the time. The only time it's a big factor for me is with light hues. Dark red/green I can tell the difference. Traffic lights have position (& they do look different to me anyway). Heck, I didn't find out about it until I was out of college & saw the Ishihara tests.

  The dual color LEDs in the network closet? Not so much. I wouldn't mind having an inexpensive magnifying glass to make one or the other pop.

Comment Re:I'll bet the effect is very mild. (Score 1) 187

That's pretty much what morphine does to me. It does very little to reduce the pain, but it makes me completely not care about it. That, and throw up a lot, like most narcotics do with me. For the life of me I can't understand how people get addicted to the stuff. I'd *much* rather be in pain than feeling nauseous.

When I had my ACL in my knee repaired, they put mophine w/ a button I could press to deliver it when it was safe for the next dose.

I felt it didn't do much for the pain, but it did make me nauseous. I really didn't have too much pain so I stopped using it.

Comment Re:Trade off tape vs HD (Score 2) 229

> Tape isn't dead, but it's not worth it for small quantities

The cheapest LTO-6 drive on NewEgg is $1500, and Sony has the tapes for $18/TB. External hard drives are running about $35/TB. So you need ~90 TB for cost crossover on sheer data volume, not considering usability and reliability.

People who quote that hard drives are cheaper than tape always leave out the cost of electricity and reliability. If I'm going to tape, that is one of the reasons whether it's backup or archiving. I can take that tape out and store it w/o power for years and reliably read it back.

How long can you reliably do that with a hard drive? The mfg don't design drives for that, they design for always powered up drives. If I need that, I probably need to test for it and that can change with models and firmware settings. So you might have those costs for a powered off drive. If it doesn't last as long, you have medium exchange.

HDs are more delicate. I can reliably ship a tape cross country and read it on the other side. USB hard drives, not so much. I can put tapes in a vast array that a robot retrieves from so human hands don't damage them transferring them. I can't do that with HDs.

I put ~ 20 GB on 4mm DATs in the 90s (1.3 GB/ea) and read them back 10 years later. Drive was ~ $1k, tapes $10 so the cost was ~ $1200. Disk was $100/GB (probably more, 4GB drives came out ~ 97) so I would've need $2000 of them. If I needed to keep them spun up how much was 10 years of electricity + the SCSI interfaces ($200 * 2?) to keep them running + the enclosure to put them in (20+ drives? ).

Costs for the drives *today* would be much lower, but the electricity over 10 years is still there.

Comment Re: Worst idea ever. (Well, one of them). (Score 2) 168

As someone else who has been depressed, when the SSRI start working (& it can take 6 weeks IFF they work) you have energy and the ability to act that you didn't before.

I wasn't suicidal during my depression and that did not change. It didn't change any of the times I had to switch medications (you have to taper off and go through depression before you start the next).

I put my energies into things I wanted to do but couldn't with the depression. If I had been suicidal, maybe I would've tried.

Instead I did the things I had enjoyed before. With the depression, it wasn't possible to enjoy those things. I even questioned if I had ever enjoyed them.

Comment Re: Be Concerned About More than Computer Hack (Score 1) 52

Most of us learned to ignore car alarms.

In college, our dorm was next to the parking lot. One night, some car alarm malfunctioned & went off with a the car horn on continuously. It woke us up at 2am. After 20 minutes we went out to try to shut it off. We were not willing to break things & couldn't pop the hood to disconnect the batt. So we tried to go to sleep. 2 hours later, the horn's 2nd tone stopped. In 20 minutes it was quiet as the battery died & we cheered.

Now the owner had a dead battery & a dorm of students pissed at them. We could have done anything to that car w/o the owner knowing until morning.

Nobody does car alarms like that anymore.

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