Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Comment Re:If you're refusing a refund ... (Score 1) 358

Partially agreed, but whether the game is designed to require more than 50 hours or not you personally would be able to tell whether you were enjoying it by that point. I have hundreds of Skyrim hours logged, but would have stopped playing after only a few hours if I didn't like it. Conversely I tried The Witcher (first one) recently and just didn't get alone with it at all - about two hours in total. Elite:Dangerous, a very direct comparison to No Mans Sky, I've not really got along with either despite being a massive original Elite fan and a passably high-tier Kickstarter backer of this one. I'm glad the new one exists, but it's not for me. Logged time - 9 hours.

You get the idea. The game may well require more than 50 hours, but if you're not enjoying it you'll know well before those 50 hours are played.

Comment Re:If you're refusing a refund ... (Score 4, Insightful) 358

50 hours of gameplay is a long time. As an example, I started playing Tomb Raider (2013) a few days ago - got it in a sale literally years ago and never played, finally got round to playing it. I've completed the story, and am just going back to polish off the areas I didn't get 100% completion on. Only two of those to go, and I'm done.

I have 56 hours of gameplay logged. Just to recap - I've done damned near everything, thoroughly enjoyed myself, and have 56 hours logged. 50 gameplay hours at a game I hate? That would be insane.
User Journal

Journal Journal: Establishment vs Establishment 1

The framing of the 2016 election is that this is the establishment vs the anti-establishment. Clinton represents Washington DC. Trump represents the masses.

This is bullshit.

Comment Re:Logic Says It Should Be Legal (Score 1) 361

When are drugs like flupirtine going to be available in the US?

When the DEA can figure out the correct amount of Tylenol to require to be added to every pill to ensure that anyone taking enough to get high will die. Just because it's not an opioid doesn't mean it doesn't make people feel good, and our government cannot allow that under any circumstances.

Comment Re: IP law has nothing to do with logic. (Score 0) 361

hrcck... krrkk...

Just a minute sir, I understand that you are in urgent need but we are still reviewing your account details.

gkk... ackk...

OK, we have determined you have a credit card with a $4000 limit and a current balance of $381.17. This brings your charge for our lifesaving drug to 3618.83. Do I have your permission to proceed?

hkk...

Ah, sorry, I charged this to your bank card and it was rejected with an overdraft fee. I've reprocessed it to your VISA and it was approved.

...

Sir? Sir?

Comment Re:Fair use (Score 1) 164

It would be fair use only if used infrequently. For example, if you want to quote someone else's article in your article, that's fair use. However, if your entire business is dependent upon making snippets from thousands of articles, that's no longer fair use, it's commercial use.

No, you're wrong.

First, fair use applies to both commercial and non-commercial uses. For example, when Mad Magazine did a movie parody, that would be fair use, even though the magazine us sold for an increasing cheap price and is a commercial venture.

Second, the previous poster didn't really explain it well. Fair use is when a copyrighted work is used without permission in a way that, but for fair use, would be infringing, but which is not infringing because it is in the general purpose of copyright to allow such a use. It's evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and is completely fact dependent. This, any particular use might be a fair use, but not just any use actually is.

There's a test for finding out whether a use is fair or not. It has four factors, though it isn't a matter of adding up how many factors go one way or another, and depending on the case, one factor might be treated as outweighing another. Plus, it's just a tool; other factors can be considered too.

The factors are: 1) the purpose and character of the use, such as whether the use is for profit or not, whether the use would advance the progress of knowledge by resulting in something new or otherwise helpful; 2) the nature of the work being used, such as whether it is fictional and therefore very creative and worth protecting, or factual, and therefore not worth protecting quite so much (how a work presents itself is also often relevant in copyright; if you claim that something is a fact, even though it's made up or is just a hypothesis, others may get to treat it as a fact) as well as whether the work being used has already been published or not; 3) the amount of the work used, and how important to the work that portion is; and 4) whether the use will have a negative effect on the value or market for the work (positive effects are not considered).

Snippets of this type -- in aggregate, mind you -- have repeatedly been found to be fair use in the US because for the first factor, although the use is commercial in nature, it provides a benefit to society in being able to search for this material (which of course requires as much material as possible to be used in constructing the index, even though the index itself, as opposed to the results of a search, is not made available), the second factor may weigh against the use depending on the material being indexed, but it is not treated as being very important, obviously the whole work must be used to make the index for the index to be useful, so the third factor doesn't matter, and for the fourth factor, it doesn't harm the market for news articles to be able to find them and to see in one or two lines why they match your search terms. It doesn't matter if that's the business model.

And if you think this is extreme, look at time shifting, which is bad on all of the first three factors, but is sufficiently successful on the fourth so as to be fair use (in a general way, since again it is highly fact dependent)

Comment Re:More political redirection (Score 1) 533

Depending on the circumstances (such as happening after a subpoena) it's called consciousness of guilt.

A great example of this is if you happen to use a firearm (you claim) in self defense, flee the scene, and not immediately report the incident to police, you are going to have a very difficult time mounting a self-defense case as your actions after the fact suggest you knew you did wrong.

Comment Re:More political redirection (Score 2) 533

I prefer option 3, they are pointing out the peculiarity that, given all the other shit she's pulled, in this one instance, she chose to follow best practices.

"Your Honor, just because my client was in the vicinity of the shooting, drove to a near by store to buy bleach & laundry detergent, then drove home to wash his supposedly blood covered clothes, allegedly scrubbed gunshot residue from his hands, randomly decided to meticulously clean several of his firearms in no way demonstrates any consciousness of guilt, instead just best practices with regards to laundry and firearm maintenance"

Yeah, see how that works.

Slashdot Top Deals

The most difficult thing in the world is to know how to do a thing and to watch someone else doing it wrong, without commenting. -- T.H. White

Working...