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Comment Hands-free? (Score 3, Insightful) 166

Tesla cars don't support hands-free operation. You're supposed to keep your hands on the steering wheel while using autopilot, and the car will disable auto pilot after a while if you take your hands off the wheel.

Perhaps they should reduce that timeout to discourage people from taking their hands off the wheel entirely.

Comment Ignores the ulterior motive of traffic stops (Score 3, Interesting) 311

This ignores the unspoken policy that traffic stops are not always about enforcing traffic law and collecting small fines, but rather the police want that interaction with the driver so they can fish for bigger violations. Traffic stops are "pretext stops", a loophole to get around the 4th amendment.

Running your plate and taking your ID isn't about making sure they assign points to the right person, but also about looking for wants and warrants. Getting you to roll down the window and talk to the officer isn't really about checking whether you smell like booze or pot, or seem nervous. There is no right to remain silent when an automobile is involved., and traffic stops are one of the most productive ways to find and arrest people with outstanding warrants.

Comment Re:He is lucky he did not get shot on the spot (Score 2) 235

Drive 350 miles between Montreal and Providence, and you'll pass through four states and one province. An extra 60 miles and you could add another two states to that. 7 states/provinces in 410 miles. Damn straight I've said aloud "What state are we in?" while driving in New England.

Comment Re:Has NVIDIA invented ray tracing? (Score 1) 17

There are demos out there you can look at, using modified Rift HMDs. A company called SMI has been working on it. The limitation isn't the understanding of visual acuity, but the overall polish and sophistication of the implementation:

http://www.roadtovr.com/hands-...

Another major issue is the ability to actually derive speed benefits from this approach. If you're implementing it by (as they do in this demo) rendering three different views at different resolutions in different passes, there's a fair bit of overhead involved, and I suspect that they'd also have overlap between the layers where they're rendering more than they need to (can you really tell a GPU to render a donut-shaped view and not spend any time on the pixels in the middle? I don't know, but I'm skeptical)

That, I think, is where nVidia's approach comes into play: by removing the performance penalty of rendering multiple projected views, and using the projection to get the detail (and lack thereof) where you want it to be, basically just a more extreme version of the lens-matched rendering that I linked the screenshots of. Refine that, refine the hardware to the point of being consumer-ready, and you start to see some major benefits.

Comment Re:Has NVIDIA invented ray tracing? (Score 1) 17

Your eye can only really see detail in a very small area where you are directly looking (in the centre of your vision), but your brain is very good at filling in the blanks and hiding this fact. It drops off extremely rapidly, and for the vast majority of your field of view, you can resolve barely more than basic colour and movement.

The idea behind foveated rendering is, you use eye-tracking to figure out where the user's eye is looking, and then you render a very small full-detail image and place that where they're looking, and then you render a larger lower resolution image and put that behind it, repeating that until you're rendering very few pixels out around the periphery of the vision. Your eye can't tell that the image is getting less detailed (blurrier, really) as it moves away from your centre of vision, because you can't perceive the lack of detail. Obviously I'm simplifying with the progessively-lower-resolution-images description, but that's the gist of it.

When I say the detail drops off really fast from the centre of your vision, I mean it drops off EXTREMELY fast. Check out this graph:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Just 10 degrees off centre and you can only see 20% of the detail. But current rendering systems would still be drawing 100% of the pixels in that area.

To get an idea about how much processing power you can save with foveated rendering in an ideal case, basically consider the area of that graph overall (the whole square) versus just the area under the line. That's a speedup of multiple times.

I'll qualify all this with, I'm no expert, I've just read into it a bit.

Comment Re:Vacation (Score 1) 765

Canada. Quebec, specifically. The specific text of the law in question (keeping mind this is in a section on employment contracts):

Either party to a contract for an indeterminate term may terminate it by giving notice of termination to the other party.

The notice of termination shall be given in reasonable time, taking into account, in particular, the nature of the employment, the specific circumstances in which it is carried on and the duration of the period of work.

Comment Re:Vacation (Score 1) 765

[citation needed]

Can you cite a statute?

Section 2091 of the Civil Code of Quebec. That's in book five (obligations), title two (nominate contracts), chapter vii (contract of employment):

http://ccq.lexum.com/ccq/en#!f...

Either party to a contract for an indeterminate term may terminate it by giving notice of termination to the other party.

The notice of termination shall be given in reasonable time, taking into account, in particular, the nature of the employment, the specific circumstances in which it is carried on and the duration of the period of work.

There is also a more specific law specifically dealing with an employer terminating an employee, so essentially 2091 only applies to employee resignations.

Comment Re: Of course he did. (Score 1) 289

Ummm, I don't know when this happened but that is still destruction of evidence. From this page:

Spoliation has been defined as the willful destruction of evidence or the failure to preserve potential evidence for another's use in pending or future litigation. Trigon Ins. Co. v. U.S., 204 F.R.D. 277 (E.D.Va., 2001). Two recent SJC decisions, Fletcher v. Dorchester Mutual Insurance Company, 437 Mass. 544 (2002), and Keene v. Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 439 Mass. 223 (2003), flesh out what is required of parties to civil litigation as to document retention. Both cases emphasize that sanctions (in extreme cases, up to and including default or dismissal) may be appropriate for the spoliation of evidence, whether negligent or intentional, even where the loss of potential evidence occurs before an action has been commenced, if a litigant or its expert knows or reasonably should know that the evidence might be relevant to a possible action.

(emphasis added)

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