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Comment Show off their craft? (Score 1) 295

The movies I enjoy in a real theater tend to be very bad movies. I sometimes go to the Astor in Melbourne and their current calendar has Mothra, The Thing, and Videodrome. They are running a double feature with Wrath of Kahn and Beyond where I expect the audience will be more interesting than what is on the screen. They also do good movies but I'm less likely to go to them but their screening of the Shine might be interesting since there will be a Q&A session with the producer, director and screen writer. The place sells beer and has strict no talking policies for most movies. They also do sing alongs like Meaning of Life and Rocky Horror.

Comment Re:The Theater Experience (Score 1) 295

I agree with you that many of us are no longer the teens or 20-somethings who continue to buy tickets.

I'm just not sure I agree with you on the not being numerous enough to matter. Apparently there are enough of us with enough disposable income to keep the home theatre industry going. I suspect we're also more likely to pay for genuine content, given a convenient source and inoffensive pricing, than younger viewers.

You don't beat piracy by trying to force people into a worse experience. You beat piracy by giving the people what they wanted all along, conveniently and at a fair price.

Comment I don't think that's what he did. (Score 1) 838

So you don't think the Republican candidate for the Presidency of the US inviting a foreign power, one that is at the best of times in a rather tense relationship with the United States, to hack into US systems just to gain dirt on the other party's nominee is reasonable?

It's obvious to a native speaker of English (who isn't astroturfing the Democrats' talking points) that Trump was NOT inviting the Russians to initiate a new crack on his opponent's servers.

He was ribbing his opponents, and keeping their lax security (and their "The Russians are aiding him!" attempt at distraction) in the public eye, by pointing out that the Russians probably ALREADY have the emails that Clinton's people "can't find", and inviting them to dig them out of their own archives and provide them to investigators and/or the press.

People claiming he is inviting new espionage don't just look foolish. They also play into his hands, by keeping the issue in the face of prospective voters.

But feel free to continue. B-)

Comment Re:The Theater Experience (Score 1) 295

The most important attribute of my home setup:

Audience = Whoever in the household wants to watch

Sometimes my wife and I enjoy the same things. Sometimes one of us wants to watch something that doesn't particularly interest the other. Adults don't necessarily all want to watch family movies with the kids (again). If we have friends over, we just buy extra food and drink before the show.

A decent cinema has a big screen and good sound, but the experience with a high-end home system these days is close enough that if the movie is any good at all you're not going to notice.

For me, as someone with less free time but nicer stuff than I had 20 years ago, the only compelling advantage of a big cinema these days is that they still get the movies when they release, which means you can watch them before some [expletive deleted] spoils everything. Waiting for the Blu-Ray to come out (or some online streaming service to offer it, if that's your thing) takes an eternity, and it's an entirely artificial barrier that exists only to prop up cinemas that are otherwise losing relevance.

Personally, I would pay significantly more than the cost of a cinema ticket to have an actual, my-own-copy Blu-Ray of a film or show (or a DRM-free download from a fast, legal source) to enjoy in the comfort of my own home as soon as I want it.

Comment Re:From where does the FAA get power to regulate i (Score 1) 44

Having a patchwork assembly of differing state and local regulations and restrictions to follow while in the air would absolutely affect interstate commerce. There's really no good rational argument against that.

Yet we have just such a patchwork assembly of differing state and local regulations and restriction to follow while on the roads: Speed limits and rules for setting them, turn restrictions, stop and yield sign placement, various rules of the road and its amenities (turn-on-red, where - if at all - U-turns are legal, lane-change frequency restrictions, lane restrictions on trucks (and no-truck routes), passing on the right, maximum durations at rest stops and activity there (such as sleeping or cooking over a fire), and a host of other rules - not to mention their enforcement) all vary from state to state.

It's dependent on each state's government(s) to pass the individual regulations. Yes, there's a lot of standardization, and following federal rules. But the federal rules are followed voluntarily when it's in a state's interest, enforced as a condition of federal funding for construction and maintenance of roads bearing US or Interstate route designations, or encouraged by federal blackmail composed of the withholding of the state's share of funds gathered by the federal gasoline taxes.

Any argument that flying at all is interstate commerce goes double for driving - where long-haul trucks, passenger cars, and even bicycles and pedestrians share common roads. So why does the Federal government have to blackmail the states into legislating their way for regional and local roads, yet can claim it has the right to totally control flight, not just of interstate traffic and/or at interstate altitudes or in the glidepaths around federally-funded airports, but of battery-powered gadgets, with range far to limited to reach a state border from most parts of a state, lighter than the average dog, and all the way down to the grass in your back yard?

Comment Re:Horse Shit (Score 5, Insightful) 401

Valve quit crying because they got bored with SteamOS. A major problem with Valve's "flat" model of no bosses and no structure is that they only work on something if they find it interesting. Once they get bored, it languishes. Half Life 3 is a great example. There was clearly more story to tell, they left it unfinished, and there is clearly market demand for a sequel to the point it would be virtually assured to make money. So why hasn't it happened? Because they aren't interested in it right now. It's not a business or creative decision, it is that people are playing with other shit.

Valve is now fascinated with VR and eSports so that is where most of their energy is going. They are the shiny new toys they like, until they change their mind and chase something else. So SteamOS is in the same general boat as Steam itself in that they work on it a bit and maintain it, but there isn't a lot going on because there are few people interested in it.

Also I think they thought that SteamOS and Steam Machines would be like Steam itself: minimal effort on their part and people would just flock to them and use them in droves. Instead the market has responded with a resounding "meh". They'd need to put in a lot more effort to have a chance of making it happen and they don't want to do that.

Comment There is no, it is doomsaying (Score 3, Insightful) 401

Maybe it'll end up being true, but so far there is zero evidence. The only thing so far they've done that would in any way limit Steam is that their universal applications (what used to be called Metro) are Windows Store only. So you can't sell those on Steam. Ok, except nobody but MS makes those because nobody gives a shit. The "universal" part doesn't matter, MS's phones and tablets are in their final dying moments so there's no need to make something that runs both on real Windows and Windows RT/Phone.

At this point Win32/64 programs run better and have less limitations, and also have the advantage of running on all versions of Windows not just 10, so that is what people keep making. MS themselves are releasing their games using their new UWP format, of course, but nobody else seems to give a shit.

So it is a meaningless limitation for now. Programs using an API nobody uses won't work with Steam. Who cares? Other than that, nothing has changed or been limited. Steam runs great on Windows 10.

Will something change in the future? We'll have to wait and see. There's no evidence now though, because it hasn't happened. This is a doomsday prediction, and like most doomsday predictions it is based on what the predictor feels to be true, not actual evidence.

Comment Ummm... no (Score 2) 401

For one, they haven't done anything yet. This is Tim Sweeny doomsaying. Now maybe his predictions will be accurate but they are false right now. Presently, Steam works excellent in Windows 10. You download it, install it, and it just works as it does on any other platform. They have done nothing to stop it from working.

You can't scream about "abuse" when nothing has happened. That is like claiming someone robbed you when they didn't actually take anything from you or even say anything to you they just "look sketchy, like they might rob you."

Second, all the monopoly stuff has gone out the windows with Apple around now. You can't argue MS is a monopoly in the desktop arena with Apple selling tons of their products. Macbooks are trendy as hell and all kinds of people buy them. Having a major, viable, competitor defacto makes someone not a monopoly. Same deal in servers to an even larger extent as Linux is huge in the server market. And in phones? Shit MS is hardly a player.

They aren't in a monopoly position anymore, so anti-monopoly arguments don't work.

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