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Comment Re:Technically neither can ICANN or a domain provi (Score 1) 135

Copyright law still benefits people.

Overall it does. In some specific situations, it does not. One category of these is a copyright owner deliberately keeping a previously published or publicly exhibited work out of print everywhere or in particular countries. An example of this is Song of the South. Another is uncertainty over whether a song you've written is legally original, as opposed to an accidental infringement of copyright in someone else's song. An example of this is "My Sweet Lord" by George Harrison. Why are those specific cases worth keeping?

Heck, I did something similar with a needle - just pierce a hole at random, then figure out which sectors are unreadable in my original. If you could read them, the floppy was not an original. And since it was at random, no two disks were alike. Writing data to the original wasn't a big deal - once you knew where the bad sectors were, skip over them.

Nintendo GameCube disc authentication works the same way: burn six evenly spaced pinholes in the lead-in at some random theta, and then mark in the Burst Cutting Area which sectors were burned.

Comment LGPL does not "infect" the same way (Score 1) 44

Needs a stable, standard, unencumbered, free GUI -- windows, menus, toolbars, widgets, mouse, touch, etc. It'd be lovely if it was open source and not a barely-masked invitation to buy a new Porsche for some lawyer, too. IOW, no GPL infection.

Assuming that by "infection" you mean "causing [a larger work] to be distributable only under copyleft terms":

Both GTK+ widgets and Qt widgets are under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL). Because LGPL is a weak copyleft, use of an LGPL library in a larger work does not "infect" it. It does, however, require an application's object to be available to a licensed user without digital restrictions management, which rules out a port to iOS or major video game consoles.

Comment Re:GAO is right (Score 1) 261

The top registrars get together and decide to start their own name server. They give some payments to a few of the top ISPs, and it's basically a done deal.

Let's look at it with a concrete example, of a site that Russia actually tried to block: recently, Russia decided to block pornhub. If it got removed from the top registrar, then everyone who wants to visit pornhub will be upset, and look for alternatives.

Comment GAO is right (Score 2, Insightful) 261

The GAO is probably right, it doesn't require an act of congress, but the lawsuit only has to delay it long enough for Trump to become president. If Hillary becomes president, then it's pointless.

It could cause problems if domain names are influence-able by governments hostile to free speech, but If it gets too annoying, we'll all just switch to another name server. They can't keep the speech itself down, only certain domain names. My point is, that in the worst case, it's not the end of the world, and the Google index is much, much more important.

Comment Cable already owns Hulu (Score 2) 241

Same boss because once things start shifting the Cable TV companies will acquire Netflix/Hulu/youname it.

Hulu LLC is owned by Disney, Comcast, Fox, and Time Warner. All four companies own broadcast TV networks (ABC, NBC, Fox, and half of CW respectively) as well as mid-tier cable TV networks. Comcast is also a multichannel pay television provider.

Comment Goodwill hunting for legit MP3s (Score 1) 308

Repeated in my own words in case I misunderstood: Your middle-school-age nephew is buying used products at thrift stores in other cities with his dad's transportation and consigning the products to his dad to flip on eBay, and that's how he affords to buy legit music.

If I understood your post correctly, that's little different from his dad giving him an allowance, as his dad is providing free transportation and free use of his eBay seller account. Both the transportation and the eBay seller account require being 18 or older. The only labor the nephew contributes is deciding which products are worth flipping.

How does the nephew determine what to buy to flip? I ask because I'm trying to evaluate how well this sort of business would work for my cousins.

Comment Re:The option I want to see (Score 1) 237

All I ask is the ability to exclude a carrier. I would exclude USPS as long as I live in Dover because they will not deliver packages that are larger than will fit in the mailbox for anyone on this route. Everywhere else I've ever lived USPS will ring the bell if they have a package that won't fit but not here. Instead they scan the package AS DELIVERED (although to be fair to the carrier, she specifies "per supervisor") so that they don't look bad to Amazon, and leave a slip instructing us to pick the packages up. Oddly enough, they (USPS) will deliver to the door on this route on Sundays (wtf?)... but not any other day.

Comment Re:USPS (Score 1) 237

> Seriously, loosing the USPS won't be a good thing in the long run.

It depends on where you live.
Most places I've lived, USPS is every bit as good as UPS and FedEx where the carriers will ring your bell or at least honk the horn if they've got a package for you.

Now, I live in a city but on a "rural route" (in a city) and they will not ring the bell. Instead, they leave the little slip letting you know that they expect you to do their work for them and go pick up the package. I would not have a problem with this if the post office were open beyond bankers' hours... but they close early and I work until 6pm. How the fuck am I going to get my packages without taking time off of work?

To make things worse, they scan the packages as "delivered" - but in the particular carrier's defense, she notates it "scanned as delivered PER SUPERVISOR." One time I asked her about this, and she said she puts "PER SUPERVISOR" because she has been instructed to scan packages as delivered but she knows that is essentially mail fraud so she clarifies that it is per instruction of her supervisor. She said the reason her supervisor does this is to make them not look bad to Amazon, because she makes her do this for ALL customers on this route when the package will not fit in the mailbox. Her supervisor has instructed the staff to not even load the packages on the truck.

Fuck the USPS. The sooner we let them die the better.

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