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Comment Re:Or... (Score 3, Informative) 78

I'm afraid that your "pre-1940s" view of the US is either rose tinted or just plain incorrect. While Teddy Roosevelt spoke of the need to speak softly and carry a big stick, the foreign policy of the United States has been largely the opposite of the isolationist position that many people seem to think is our norm. There's a reason the USMC's Battle Hymn starts with "from the Hallf of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli." We've invaded both Canada and Mexico in our history, and (prior to the 1940 date you remember fondly) had been at war on every continent save Australia and Antartica. We took the vast majority of our nation away from the people who already lived there. I'm reasonably certain that every single US extraterritorial possession (i.e. Guam, etc) was in our possession prior to the second world war, except for a bunch of tiny atolls in the Pacific we built bases on during the war and maybe kept afterward.

I personally think that, on the whole, we've been a stronger force for "good" (however you want to define that) than "evil" but I do have my biases.

Comment Re:You know I could get in to something like this (Score 1) 81

Well personally I've been quite happy with a number of the new features. Also security isn't irrelevant to me, given that I do work to keep my device secure by updating it, by running security software, and be screening what I install and only installing things I need.

I am talking about MY interest in something and ya, having new versions of software is something that I consider. If I'm getting a new device that is something I want.

Comment Re:Six million soon-to-be-unhappy Comcast customer (Score 1) 141

I think you missed the point. In this context, customers refers to individual people and families. Corporations are more important than people, and so, by definition, get better service. It does not contradict the GP who says that a happy Comcast customer is a myth.

I'm the guy who deals with the sales guys, tech guys, field guys and manages the circuits on a day to day basis. To suggest that I'm not a customer is an absurdity. With regard to your schtick that corporte customers are more important because they're "not people" I think it has more to do with the fact that the check we cut Comcast every month probably equals what everyone else in a quarter-mile radius pays, combined.

Comment You know I could get in to something like this (Score 3, Interesting) 81

But only if they'd start releasing OS updates for their older hardware. Given that Samsung drops support after just 18 months, I don't think I'd want to buy a refurb since it is going to get updates for, at most 6 more months. If I am going to get something with no updates, I'd want it for actual used market prices, which is to say really cheap.

Comment Re:Six million soon-to-be-unhappy Comcast customer (Score 1) 141

I'm a VERY happy Comcast customer (so they do exist) but I'm an enterprise customer and not a residential customer, so YMMV. Something like 3-4 hours of unscheduled downtime in the last five years on the HFC circuit, and the GigE private circuit that I have for one of my remote sites hasn't seen any downtime since installation last year.

I'd like to say that "service with big telecom improves as you spend more money" but AT&T still sucks no matter how much money I give them.

Comment Re:What the fuck are you whining about? (Score 1) 148

No, that's not the approach you take. If you think it is, well you need to grow up. You don't cause massive compatibility problems and huge disruptions just for the fun of it. Instead, you do things as smoothly as possible. There is no need to rush out IPv6, it isn't like the world will blow up. IPv4 works, and will continue to work.

You thinking that implementing something like this on a worldwide scale being cheap, easy or quick just shows a massive lack of experience and perspective.

Comment Re:Which US ISPs? (Score 1) 148

I can't speak authoritatively to Comcast, not having it, but everything I see says they have dual-stack on their entire residential network. Have you tried it? You have to set up DHCP-PD on your router (that is how most ISPs are doing it) and they should give you a prefix that your devices can use.

Comment What the fuck are you whining about? (Score 1) 148

What do you mean we've done nothing to move people to IPv6? Do you think it is magic? Do you think we just wave a wand and people are on v6? No, what it takes is rolling out support on the OS, router, ISP, and so on. That has been happening, lots. Have a look at Google's IPv6 chart: https://www.google.com/intl/en... what you see is exponential growth happening. This is actual IPv6 connections as well, Google is counting the percentage of people hitting their site with v6, which means an end-to-end connection.

Oh and ISPs have indeed been making IPv6 available to home users, wouldn't see that graph otherwise. For US cable providers Comcast is dual stack on their whole network, Time Warner is on about 90% of it, and Cox is on all of it. That's a whole lot of the US population. This isn't theoretical support either or "Oh call us and maybe we'll turn it on," it is live, on the network, and working now. On my Cox connection all I had to do was tell my router to get itself a prefix and go. My connections to Google, Netflix, and anyone else who supports v6 go out over it.

You don't "move" people to v6 as in force them on to it and turn off v4. Rather you make it available, and chosen by default, which is precisely is what is going on. When the device supports it (Linux including Android and Windows are both dual stack and prefer v6, not sure about OS-X), the router supports it, and the network supports it you are good to go.

Comment Which US ISPs? (Score 1) 148

Cox is dual-stack on their entire network. Comcast is likewise. Time Warner is about 90% done with IPv6 on their network. That most of the US's cable providers right there, with Charter being the only major that doesn't have IPv6 yet and they are working on it actively.

Not every ISP has it, of course, when you count DSL CLECs, dial up, and so on there are literally thousands of ISPs in the US. However it seems that most of the major cable providers do, and combined those guys serve a massive part of the US population.

In fact, have a look at Google's IPv6 adoption map: https://www.google.com/intl/en.... Looks like the US is doing pretty good. Not only is adoption high compared to most countries, but it works well.

Also remember that IPv6 adoption is more than just ISPs getting it. It needs end-to-end support in that users have to get IPv6 capable routers and devices, and have it enabled.

Comment Re:Depends on carrier but yes (Score 1) 198

Used to be that way in the US for all carriers. If they'd even let you BYOD, which was only sometimes, you still paid the full amount on your monthly bill so you were just getting screwed. Only ones that didn't were prepaid carriers, which tend to be niche (usually regional and targeting lower income customers).

However T-Mobile changed that, their big, and highly successful, marketing push was to do away with contracts which also meant doing away with subsidies. To respond to people complaining about upfront price they then did the 24 month financing.

Some of the others have followed suit now, since it was a successful campaign, but not all.

Comment There was that, but they did well before (Score 1) 188

The Athlon was very competitive with the P3, which was an exceedingly solid processor. So it wasn't just that Intel screwed up, but AMD had a well performing product to start with.

But then ya, they really slowed down and stopped improving. They kept rehashing the same architecture over and over. They introduced new features, like 64-bit, but the computational architecture was fundamentally the same. Meanwhile Intel was hard at work making the Core series and just continually improving.

Also AMD had a real problem in that while the Athlon was a good performer, the motherboard chipsets for it were fucking garbage. So the experience of owning an Athlon was a real mixed one and turned some people off. I got burned really badly by the original Athlon and compatibility issues with their motherboards and was turned off to AMD for some time because of it.

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