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Comment Re:Or people are just under/wrongly medicated. (Score 1) 432

Society isn't a shit heap. By almost any measure, things are better than they have ever been for almost everybody in the world. Wars are at an all time low, violence is too. Things only seem worse because the media and politicians stand to gain from you thinking that way.

Comment Re:Better be ready to be beat up when layed off wo (Score 3, Insightful) 541

Who cares if people can be successful artists. The point is that they have the freedom to choose if that's what they want to do with their lives. Being good at it is irrelevant.

The UBI solves the problem of where people are supposed to get money to buy the things that are produced when there aren't enough jobs for humans to do to support the economy.

Comment Late-Breaking News from the Council: WTF G'RANEE? (Score 2) 244

>K'Breel was deposed and executed after his repeated failures in repelling the Terran aggressor. We don't speak of him. All hail mighty G'Ranee, Supreme Leader for Life!

LATE-BREAKING NEWS FROM THE COUNCIL: VICTORY! The Council of Elders has confirmed the blueworlders' resumption of aggression upon our noble red sands. K'Breel, Speaker for the Council of Elders, addressed the planet thusly: OKAY. Okay, so I'm K'Breel (even though anyone on Slashdot can assume the mantle merely by declaring themselves Speaker for the Council), and I'm late, but I'm merely chronologically late, not as in the Late Second Adjunctant to the Council Formerly Known As G'Ranee.

But domestic politics is beneath us tonight -- just take a glance at the blue world beneath us for a look at how bad that can get -- and let us focus on what's important: over the past sol or so, our Planetary Defense Force has been so good at pre-emptively distracting the blueworlders with tasks like landing comets, grabbing their prospective mates by their genitals, low-planetary orbit missions, and just general tribal infighting that we haven't had to shoot down any robotic invaders in quite some time. But when the opportunity presents itself, we take advantage of it, and so, we did. Hence the trivial elimination of yet another putative invader from elsewhere. We'd do it every day, except that the blueworlders lack the gelsacular fortitude to send us more targets. Now as to gelsacular fortitude, on to Second Adjunctant G'Ranee...

When a junior reporter pointed out that the destroyed invader was merely a technology demonstrator built on the cheap to see if a landing was possible, and that the blueworlders' actual payload was safely in orbit, K'Breel had the reporter's gelsacs launched into orbit alongside those of G'Ranee for a closer look.

Comment Re:Progress (Score 1) 133

> Too bad the computers will NEVER be able to reliably make the kinds of judgment calls that humans can and the entire AI borg system is going to come crashing down sooner or later, so we really won't have to worry about the anti-humanist ilk ever really doing much of anything to worry about.

This may be the dumbest comment I've ever read on Slashdot, and I've been here for a while. The whole point of self driving cars is that they will have *better* judgement than us slow, panicky humans. There are something like 33,000 deaths per year in the US alone caused by traffic accidents. If letting our cars drive themselves can even half that, we've made a huge score.

Submission + - US Efforts To Regulate Encryption Have Been Flawed, Government Report Finds (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: U.S. Republican congressional staff said in a report released Wednesday that previous efforts to regulate privacy technology were flawed and that lawmakers need to learn more about technology before trying to regulate it. The 25-page white paper is entitled Going Dark, Going Forward: A Primer on the Encryption Debate and it does not provide any solution to the encryption fight. However, it is notable for its criticism of other lawmakers who have tried to legislate their way out of the encryption debate. It also sets a new starting point for Congress as it mulls whether to legislate on encryption during the Clinton or Trump administration. "Lawmakers need to develop a far deeper understanding of this complex issue before they attempt a legislative fix," the committee staff wrote in their report. The committee calls for more dialogue on the topic and for more interviews with experts, even though they claim to have already held more than 100 such briefings, some of which are classified. The report says in the first line that public interest in encryption has surged once it was revealed that terrorists behind the Paris and San Bernardino attacks "used encrypted communications to evade detection."

Comment Re:Pointless and Useless Speculation (Score 1) 559

My guess is that life will be fairly common in the universe, but almost all of that life will be of the single celled variety. Just look at the history of life on Earth - for 2.9 billion of the 3.5 billion years that life has existed, that's what it was. Getting over the hump of becoming multicellular is a huge barrier. For most of the remaining 600 million years, life was of the non-intelligent sort. There is no reason to think that it's inevitable. Civilizations are probably extremely rare in the universe, let alone civilizations that don't destroy themselves soon after becoming intelligent.

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