Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Inside the NSA's cybersecurity summer camp (

v3rgEz writes: It's fair to say that after the Edward Snowden leaks, the National Security Agency (NSA) has had a bit of an image problem, which in turn has affected recruiting efforts. So what is the NSA doing to combat all this bad PR? Summer camps. And FOIA site MuckRock has filed FOIA requests to find out exactly what is going on at those camps, turning up a range of activities from pen testing and social engineering training to, er, the NSA's own "Kobayashi Maru." Read the full documents at MuckRock.

Submission + - Family sues Amazon after counterfeit hoverboard catches fire, destroys home (

tripleevenfall writes: A Nashville family whose $1 million home was destroyed earlier this year in a fire caused by a hoverboard toy is suing Amazon saying the retail giant knowingly sold a dangerous product.

The lawsuit says the seller of the hoverboard listed online, "W-Deals," is a sham organization that is registered to an apartment in New York City that has not responded to requests from lawyers in the case. It alleges the family was sold a counterfeit product from China instead of a brand with a Samsung lithium ion battery they believed they were buying from Amazon.

Comment Re:How do they make money anyway? (Score 2) 56

A lot of them also can charge for subscriptions. They post some free samples that cut off just before the money shot to drive traffic to their site. When you want to smack it to some live goat porn and you want to do it NOW, it's pretty easy to drop that $30 on the Visa card for the specific thing you're looking for.

And no, 6 seconds really isn't enough, unless they happen to have a LOT of goats. I mean, way more than the usual ones. Like, at least 10-15 goats...

Submission + - New Code Injection Attack Works On All Windows Versions (

Orome1 writes: Researchers from security outfit enSilo have uncovered a new code injection technique that can be leveraged against all Windows versions without triggering current security solutions. They’ve dubbed the technique AtomBombing, because it exploits the operating system’s atom tables. These tables are provided by the operating system to allow applications to store and access data. They can also be used to share data between applications. What the researches found is that a threat actor can write malicious code into an atom table and force a legitimate program to retrieve the malicious code from the table. They also found that the legitimate program, now containing the malicious code, can be manipulated to execute that code.

Submission + - Feds charge 61 people over Indian call center IRS scams

BUL2294 writes: Following the arrests earlier this month in India of call center employees posing as IRS or immigration agents, USA Today and Consumerist are reporting that the US Department of Justice has charged 61 people in the US and India of facilitating the scam, bilking millions from Americans thinking they were facing immediate arrest and prosecution.

"According to the indictment — which covers 20 individuals in the U.S. and 32 people and five call centers in India — since about 2012 the defendants used information obtained from data brokers and other sources to call potential victims impersonating officers from the IRS or U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services."

Submission + - The FCC just passed sweeping new rules to protect your online privacy ( 1

jriding writes: Federal regulators have approved unprecedented new rules to ensure broadband providers do not abuse their customers' app usage and browsing history, mobile location data and other sensitive personal information generated while using the Internet.

The rules, passed Thursday in a 3-to-2 vote by the Federal Communications Commission, require Internet providers, such as Comcast and Verizon, to obtain their customers' explicit consent before using or sharing that behavioral data with third parties, such as marketing firms.

Submission + - How Police Body Cameras Fail (

tedlistens writes: Since the shooting of unarmed, 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014—an incident that was not captured on camera—activists and city governments have stridently fought for more police oversight through body-worn cameras, and cities are responding, with the help of millions of dollars in body camera grants from the White House. But the public is discovering that the technology isn't foolproof: Cameras fall off, officers fail to record, and the video itself can be kept largely out of the public record, in deference to privacy laws, police policies, and the challenges of managing massive amounts of footage. But, critics worry, when video collected for oversight purposes isn't shared publicly—or isn’t collected at all—citizens might become more suspicious about police misconduct, amplifying mistrust amid an effort to fight it. An article at Fast Company details ways in which body camera programs are falling short of their goals, and ideas for improving what some have called the most rapid technology upgrade in policing history.

Submission + - FCC Enacts Major New Online Privacy Rule

Trailrunner7 writes: The FCC has voted to enact a new rule that will force broadband companies to get consent from customers before they sell information about those customers’ online movements, history, and other actions.

The new rule will require broadband companies to have customers opt in to the sale or sharing of their online histories as part of marketing or ad deals. It includes restrictions on the way that providers can share users’ location data and other information and also ensures that they will have to tell consumers exactly what data they collect and what they do with it. The changes do not apply to how broadband providers can use customer information in their own marketing, though.

The new regulations also require that broadband providers have “common-sense” data breach notifications and reasonable security practices.

The vote by the FCC makes distinctions between broadband providers and phone carriers and other service providers. Before the vote, providers and others had urged the FCC to align its rules with existing ones from the FTC on usage of customer data for marketing.
User Journal

Journal Journal: As predicted ACA and insurance are incompatible.

An article in nytimes shows that millions of Americans choose not to pay insurance premiums but instead only get insurance coverage when they need it because the premiums are more expensive than government penalties of not buying insurance and because simultaneously the government forces the insurance companies to cover anybody regardless of any pre-existing conditions.

Submission + - Tesla shocks Wall St. with huge earnings surprise and actual profits (

anderzole writes: Tesla on Wednesday posted its earnings report for the quarter gone by and investors will have a lot to cheer about. While analysts on Wall St. were expecting Tesla to post a loss, Tesla during its September quarter actually posted a profit, and an impressive profit at that. When the dust settled, Tesla posted a quarterly profit of $22 million and EPS of $0.71. Revenue for the quarter checked in at $2.3 billion.

Illustrating how impressive Tesla’s performance was this past quarter, Wall St. was anticipating Tesla to post a loss amid $1.9 billion in revenue for the quarter.

Submission + - Carriers to Implement Do Not Originate List to Defeat Robocalls

Trailrunner7 writes: An industry led strike force is preparing to take away one of the most valuable pieces of technology used by phone scammers: caller ID spoofing.

The Robocall Strike Force, convened by the FCC and comprising wired and wireline telecom companies, has been working since August on a handful of new technologies, standards, and other techniques to help address the robocall problem. On Wednesday, members of the strike force delivered their report to the FCC and said that a trial of a new Do Not Originate list has shown tremendous promise in preventing scammers from being able to spoof numbers belonging to government agencies, charities, and other legitimate organizations.

A trial of the DNO list that’s been running for the last few weeks on some IRS numbers has resulted in a 90 percent drop in the volume of IRS scam calls, officials from AT&T, which leads the strike force, said during the FCC meeting Wednesday. The carriers on the strike force, which include Sprint, Verizon, and many others, plan to continue testing the DNO list in the coming months, with the intent to fully implement it some time next year.

Comment Re:Uh..... the price tag?! (Score 1, Informative) 196

I suppose you're largely paying for thin there. I can get a similarly speced Dell Precision with a touch screen and a 2TB SSD for about $1000 less (With Linux preiinstalled.) The Apple Trash Can is competing in the workstation arena, though, and I just did a monster VR desktop build and was having trouble breaking 4 grand with it. Although it would have been a lot easier if I were trying to put a Xeon or dual Xeon in it. The amount of labor I put in to building it myself probably would have tacked another $1000 or so onto the price.

Given that you'd be able to use that (Apple) machine for upwards of 10 years if you wanted to, the price isn't particularly unreasonable. My first aluminum mac pro from 2005-ish is currently serving as an asterisk box for a friend of mine who has a small business and needed a PBX system, and the machine is still plenty capable of doing that. It wasn't even ridiculously expensive for a dual Xeon workstation at the time -- I don't think I could have built one for less money back then.

Slashdot Top Deals

Not only is UNIX dead, it's starting to smell really bad. -- Rob Pike