Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:There is still a way to get science out of this (Score 1) 112

It's an interesting idea; but even without googling I'm willing to bet the impact zone is too far from any active rover. Why? Because the impact zone is probably close to the planned landing, and they probably didn't plan to land too close to a rover. Why? Because they want to explore diverse areas, and because even a well controlled landing might hit a rover.

I'm willing to wager... uhhh... stupid Internet points that the impact zone is 1000 (one thousand) km or more from any active rover.

AFAIK, the rovers can't get that far in a reasonable time. The zone will be covered with dust again, and/or the rover will fail. They can't "book it", at least not yet. They drive these things like Cameron's father's car. They're orders of magnitude more precious.

Comment I know I've said this before (Score 3, Interesting) 313

I know I've said this before: "Twitter should have been an RFC, not a company".

Remember RFCs and when there were clients other than HTTP that people cared about? This. Twitter's 140 character messages could be just UDP if you don't care about them making it, or a really quick TCP connection to some server that then redistributes the messages. Heck, it could even be blockchain based and distributed with no central server; but it never should have been a company. The only reason it's a company is because of the way VC money sloshes around in the Valley, and it's a casino where retail investors play against the house and always lose.

Comment Re:Ban should go further (Score 1) 103

For example, parent is consumer grade prose. It comes with an extra "is" and perhaps some other problems I've missed. The procedure manual for operating an airliner is probably up to some sort of editorial standard also. The airlines paid for that. You paid nothing for our prose, and you got what is you paid for.

Comment I can just imagine how this went (Score 1) 200

"Hmmm this is going to take a while" he said. "I'd better start a kettle". He turned on the gas and snapped the grill lighter hastily, as the electric ignition on the stove had not worked in years. This had been at least part of his motive for acquiring the new tech in the first place. "Now I can get to work", he muttered...

Comment Wat? (Score 4, Insightful) 326

Wat? Since when is there a popular belief that 'boomers had a stronger work ethic? Say "boomer" and I'm more likely to think "protest" than "Protestant work ethic". AFAIK the more generally held view is that as long as they weren't traumatized by the Vietnam War, they lucked into an optimal economic situation and that's why they did better.

Comment Re:couldn't coexist with their English neighbors (Score 1) 202

I know you're joking, but modern day colonists could haul a billion Bibles and not add any weight, thanks to modern storage. They also wouldn't need a printing press, for the same reason. OTOH, the printing press was used to jack the timbers and save the ship, so maybe they should have a lightweight jack on board, just in case. :)

Comment If you could visit one star every second (Score 1) 74

If you could visit one star system every second, it would take you approximately 31.7 years to visit a billion stars.

We can't even visit one in a lifetime, except of course for the one we're orbiting.

Even with Star Trek warp, a second is a pointless amount of time to spend. The captain and crew might want to spend at least a few hours doing a basic survey of the star and any planets, asteroids, or other interesting things orbiting nearby.

Thus, even with sci-fi technology it's not possible to explore all of that. Very humbling.

Oh. And it's just one lousy galaxy. There are an estimated 100 billion of those in the observable Universe.

Slashdot Top Deals

When you are working hard, get up and retch every so often.