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Submission + - Toyota unveils plan for hydrogen powered trucking (rdmag.com)

omaha393 writes: From R&D Magazine:
"Toyota announced a new initiative on Wednesday aimed at advancing its work in vehicles powered by alternative energy sources. The automaker unveiled Project Portal, which is a novel hydrogen fuel cell system designed for heavy duty truck use at the Port of Los Angeles.
A proof-of-concept truck powered by this fuel cell will be part of a feasibility study held at the Port this summer, with the goal of examining the potential of this technology in heavy-duty applications.

The test vehicle will produce more than 670 horsepower and 1,325 pound feet of torque from two of these novel fuel cell stacks along with a 12kWh battery. Overall, the combined weight capacity is 80,000 pounds that will be carried over 200 miles."
While hydrogen fuel has been criticized due to high cost of production and safety concerns, recent advances in catalysis and solid storage systems have made the prospect of hydrogen fuel an attractive commercial prospect for the future.

Submission + - Space Crystals...FROM SPACE! NASA Begins XRC Crystallization Experiments on ISS (dddmag.com)

omaha393 writes: In the field of structural biology, one of the most valuable techniques for studying the structure of large bio-molecules is X-ray crystallography (XRC). The process is tedious: XRC requires a highly pure, crystallized sample in order to obtain high quality diffraction patterns which provide high resolution maps of electron density in the sample. However, one of the barriers to obtaining an electron map and subsequent structure model is the ability to form high quality crystals.
To address this issue, NASA will begin crystallizing hard-to-crystallize samples on the international space station this week. Targets include antibodies for anti-cancer immunotherapy, potentially providing valuable insight into binding mechanisms of antibodies to cancer-specific targets. In addition to elucidating structures, NASA aims to determine how and why microgravity conditions provide higher quality crystals in the hopes of helping crystallographers in growing hard-to-crystallize crystals.

Submission + - Kim Jong Un's rockets are getting an important boost — from China (washingtonpost.com)

schwit1 writes: When North Korea launched its Kwangmyongsong-4 satellite into space last February, officials heralded the event as a birthday gift for dead leader Kim Jong Il. But the day also brought an unexpected prize for the country’s adversaries: priceless intelligence in the form of rocket parts that fell into the Yellow Sea.

Entire sections of booster rocket were snagged by South Korea’s navy and then scrutinized by international weapons experts for clues about the state of North Korea’s missile program. Along with motor parts and wiring, investigators discerned a pattern. Many key components were foreign-made, acquired from businesses based in China.

The trove “demonstrates the continuing critical importance of high-end, foreign-sourced components” in building the missiles North Korea uses to threaten its neighbors, a U.N. expert team concluded in a report released last month. When U.N. officials contacted the implicated Chinese firms to ask about the parts, the report said, they received only silence.

Submission + - The surprising rise of China as IP powerhouse (techcrunch.com)

hackingbear writes: China is not only taking the spotlight in strong defense of global markets and free trade, filling a vacuum left by retreating Western capitalist democracies, China is quickly becoming a (if not the) global leader in intellectual property protection and enforcement. And there too, just as Western democracies (especially the United States) have grown increasingly skeptical of the value of intellectual property and have weakened protection and enforcement, China has been steadily advancing its own intellectual property system and the protected assets of its companies and citizens. In addition to filing twice as many patents as the US, China is increasingly being selected as a key venue for patent litigation between non-Chinese companies. Why? Litigants feel they are treated fairly. Reports indicated that in 2015, 65 foreign plaintiffs won all of their cases against other foreign companies before Beijing’s IP court. And even foreign plaintiffs suing Chinese companies won about 81 percent of their patent cases, roughly the same as domestic Chinese plaintiffs. China’s journey from piracy to protection models the journeys of other Western and Asian countries. While building its industrial economies, the U.S. and major European powers violated IP laws with no consideration. As reported by the Guardian, Doron Ben-Atar, a history professor at Fordham University, has noted that “US and every major European state engaged in technology piracy and industrial espionage in the 18th and 19th century.” It took Western economies a hundred or more years to change that behavior. China’s mind-whipping change is happening over decades, not centuries.

Submission + - Starting a shell corporation in the US may be easier than getting a library card (brookings.edu)

omaha393 writes: From the Brookings Institute:
"One year after the Panama papers release, it is still legal and permissible for corporations in America to be anonymously owned. On March 30, the Center on Regulation and Markets at Brookings hosted Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) for a panel discussion on the efforts to end the use of shell corporations.
As Sen. Whitehouse explained, one consequence of the legality of shell corporations is that the United States has become 'a haven for those who are doing mischief through shell corporations.'

'Starting a shell corporation in this country can be easier than getting a library card. A library may actually require you to show up in person and sign for your card whereas you can form a shell corporation with a few clicks of your mouse and modest online fee.'"
Brookings fellow Aaron Klein led the panel discussion on the threat shell corporations play towards national security, emphasizing the anonymous nature of shell corporations make it impossible to track and prevent money laundering and other schemes that could finance criminal and terrorist beneficiaries.

Submission + - Amazon cashierless store hits a snag (marketwatch.com)

ugen writes: The Wall Street Journal says Amazon is having trouble tracking more than 20 customers at a time and keeping tabs on merchandise moved from store shelves. ...
For now, the technology functions flawlessly only if there are a small number of customers present, or when their movements are slow, the people said. The store will continue to need employees to help ensure the technology is accurately tracking purchases for the near future.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Does Slashdot Attend Conferences

omaha393 writes: Newbie question: how involved is Slashdot in on-the-ground interactions at conferences? I'm sure there's limitations financially that would make something like CES or E3 more difficult, but NASA offers free press credentials to launches and they have upcoming conferences with open invites to media outlets. Slashdot seems like it would be a great outlet for an invite. Given the site has millions of unique visitors monthly and an engaged community, what types of conferences could Slashdot feasibly attend? Factor in member participation to ask questions or raise funds and it seems like a good opportunity. I'm overlooking several other examples, but is this something Slashdot already does? Or is it too diffuse to be considered a true "media" outlet?

Submission + - Singapore Wants To Test Flying Taxi Drones (nypost.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "Commuters in Singapore might soon be able to ride a flying taxi home at the end of the day," writes the New York Post. "The country's Minister of Transport is in negotiations with tech companies to start trials on taxi drones that can pick up passengers, says a story by Singapore's Business Times. The driverless pods, which resemble the speeding hover bikes in Return of the Jedi, would stop for passengers based on an 'e-hail' similar to what Uber uses, the report says." Flying taxis have already been prototyped, including the Hoversurf Scorpion and the Volocopter VC200, while Dubai plans to begin testing Ehang 184 self-driving flying taxi drones in July.

Though Singapore is a small country with a relatively small workforce, the head of their ministry of transportation "noted the availability and affordability of data and the rise of artificial intelligence are already upending the transport sector globally," reports the Singapore Business Times. To that end, Singapore is also considering on-demand buses that optimize their routes, but also driverless buses. "It has signed a partnership agreement with a party to build and put such buses through a trial, and will be signing another agreement quite soon."

Comment Not broken (Score 1) 128

P53 is always present in cells but needs to be activated. Basically it's on standby to quickly kill cells in case there's DNA damage(very bad=cancer usually), so FOX helps keep it from killing healthy cells. On a side note peptides tend to get a lot of scrutiny from drug companies/designers. Our bodies readily metabolize peptides, so drug stability/delivery issues are usually the kiss of death for peptide drugs. Also, senescence is a good thing. Senescent cells don't actively divide, the alternative is mitotic cells that do divide. More divisions you have, more likely it is cancer forms. So as always, cancer and aging are inseparable and we're all doomed :)

Submission + - If you had to lecture on Cyber Terrorism 1

quantumghost writes: I have a high likelihood of presenting for a group of about 400 healthcare workers at a disaster preparedness conference next year. It is a 20 minute slot (and nothing more than a primer), but obviously, I want to capture their attention. I was thinking of working with the venue to set up a fake WiFi hotspot to capture those who randomly link to any hotspot, but how do I use that to full effect (e.g. anyone ever light up all their phones at once)? Or any suggestions about how to get their attention? Any topics that you think should be stressed? My plans for the talk will be about ransomware (and the need for backups), attacks on medical devices (hacking pacemakers, insulin pumps etc), (spear) phising attacks on providers/institutions, and awareness of social engineering — are there other topics that should be addressed?

Submission + - Astronomers Observe Supermassive Blackhole Ejected by Gravitational Waves (nasa.gov)

An anonymous reader writes: From NASA:
"Astronomers have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of a distant galaxy by what could be the awesome power of gravitational waves.

Though there have been several other suspected, similarly booted black holes elsewhere, none has been confirmed so far. Astronomers think this object, detected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, is a very strong case. Weighing more than 1 billion suns, the rogue black hole is the most massive black hole ever detected to have been kicked out of its central home.
Researchers estimate that it took the equivalent energy of 100 million supernovas exploding simultaneously to jettison the black hole. The most plausible explanation for this propulsive energy is that the monster object was given a kick by gravitational waves unleashed by the merger of two hefty black holes at the center of the host galaxy."
The findings of the study will be published in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics on March 30th.

Submission + - US Ordered 'Mandatory Social Media Check' For Some Visa Applicants (theverge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has ordered a “mandatory social media check” on all visa applicants who have ever visited ISIS-controlled territory, according to diplomatic cables obtained by Reuters. The four memos were sent to American diplomatic missions over the past two weeks, with the most recent issued on March 17th. According to Reuters, they provide details into a revised screening process that President Donald Trump has described as “extreme vetting.” A memo sent on March 16th rescinds some of the instructions that Tillerson outlined in the previous cables, including an order that would have required visa applicants to hand over all phone numbers, email addresses, and social media accounts that they have used in the past. The secretary of state issued the memo after a Hawaii judge blocked the Trump administration’s revised travel ban on citizens from six predominantly Muslim countries. In addition to the social media check, the most recent memo calls for consular officials to identify “populations warranting increased scrutiny.” Two former government officials tell Reuters that the social media order could lead to delays in processing visa applications, with one saying that such checks were previously carried out on rare occasions.

Submission + - Molecule Kills Elderly Cells, Reduces Signs of Aging In Mice (sciencemag.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Even if you aren’t elderly, your body is home to agents of senility—frail and damaged cells that age us and promote disease. Now, researchers have developed a molecule that selectively destroys these so-called senescent cells. The compound makes old mice act and appear more youthful, providing hope that it may do the same for us. As we get older, senescent cells build up in our tissues, where researchers think they contribute to illnesses such as heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes. In the past, scientists have genetically modified mice to dispatch their senescent cells, allowing the rodents to live longer and reducing plaque buildup in their arteries. Such genetic alterations aren’t practical for people, but researchers have reported at least seven compounds, known as senolytics, that kill senescent cells. A clinical trial is testing two of the drugs in patients with kidney disease, and other trials are in the works. However, current senolytic compounds, many of which are cancer drugs, come with downsides. They can kill healthy cells or trigger side effects such as a drop in the number of platelets, the cellular chunks that help our blood clot. Cell biologist Peter de Keizer of Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues were investigating how senescent cells stay alive when they uncovered a different strategy for attacking them. Senescent cells carry the type of DNA damage that should spur a protective protein, called p53, to put them down. Instead, the researchers found that a different protein, FOXO4, latches onto p53 and prevents it from doing its duty. To counteract this effect, De Keizer and colleagues designed a molecule, known as a peptide, that carries a shortened version of the segment of FOXO4 that attaches to p53. In a petri dish, this peptide prevented FOXO4 and p53 from hooking up, prompting senescent cells to commit suicide. But it spared healthy cells. The researchers then injected the molecule into mutant mice that age rapidly. These rodents live about half as long as normal mice, and when they are only a few months old, their fur starts to fall out, their kidneys begin to falter, and they become sluggish. However, the peptide boosted the density of their fur, reversed the kidney damage, and increased the amount of time they could scurry in a running wheel, the scientists report online today in Cell. When the researchers tested the molecule in normal, elderly mice, they saw a similar picture: In addition to helping their kidneys and fur, the molecule also increased their willingness to explore their surroundings.

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