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Comment Re:Poster does not understand Algebra (Score 1) 358

The fact that someone owns wealth and has not consumed it requires that at some point, someone decided not to consume it, i.e. deferred their consumption.

This is a tautology, it's true by definition.

Also, that you believe the normal state is for people to start out life with different amounts of wealth (as if it's endowed by some random action), rather than as the result of choices and work people have done says a lot about your prior beliefs.

Comment Re:Why is this even on Slashdot? (Score 1) 94

Because there just aren't enough Microsoft stories anymore, and if slashdot commenters go 24 hours without squee'ing "M$" or "Faux News" somewhere, they feel they have written nothing clever all day. The slashdot editors are concerned about their readers' self-esteem and are happy to oblige them.

Comment Re:Socially Shame the Management (Score 1) 287

Sounds like typical SJW solutions...poo poo until you ruin someone's life all because you don't like something.

I wish I had mod points, this deserves to be marked down as a troll. Anyone who uses the term "SJW" is completely full of shit and should be treated accordingly.

The GP was half way right. You need to go after the managers and "decision makers" who are responsible, but forget social media. You need to hurt them in the hip pocket. Legal and financial disincentives are what is needed to stymie outsourcing. PR can handle any social discontent, it's when their positions are threatened because its costing more to outsource than to hire local will they change.

Comment Re:That's actually debateable (Score 2) 287

the CEOs of the outsourcing firms have been caught a few times complaining about lazy Americans. And frankly he's right. By Indian or Chinese standards our 50-60 hour work weeks make us lazy. The H1-Bs I know regularly put in 80 hour work weeks. They're young and disposable but they don't care because currency exchange means they're earning a fortune working here. Best case they get a greencard and start doing the 50-60 hr work weeks of Americans, worst case they go back home flush with cash.

The moral? You can't compete with India. You can't compete with a country that has a literal cast system and effective slavery for millions of their citizens. End the H1-B program. Start calling your congressman/woman/thing and ask them why they haven't ended the program. There are other programs for rural doctors. The program is for replacing Americans. Call your congressman and ask. Remind them you and your family and your friends won't be voting for them in their primary. Make sure you say primary. They've gerrymandered the districts. After their Primary they'll win. But they're vulnerable in the primary.

Most of this post is completely incorrect. The rest is only partially incorrect.

First things first, the decision to outsource is never about quality or performance, it's always 100% about money.

Secondly, its not the "exchange rate" that makes working overseas attractive, its the disparity of income. The exchange rate just denotes how many rupees you get for dollars, income disparity is what makes you get more money per hour.

Thirdly, 12 hour working days are rare, its mostly 8 hour shifts, especially for western companies that are subject to laws back home even though the labour is outsourced. As another poster explained, the culture of long hours with Asian companies tends to be more about social rules than work. A Japanese employee might be at work for 12 hours, but thats all about appearance, they have to look like a hard worker by arriving before the boss and leaving after the boss. They don't get any extra work done, a lot of the time they are napping or socialising. This is a common theme across Asia.

In my experience, Indians buck the trend of Asian culture. Most Asian (especially the Chinese) don't like it when the Gwailo demonstrates they know more, so the appearance of knowledge is more important than the knowledge itself. The Indians are the opposite. I once had to run training in Singapore, the ethnic Chinese attended, but never participated. They didn't ask questions or interact much, to do so would have lost them face in front of their colleges. The ethnic Indians on the other hand never stopped with questions. At one point I had to ask them to write them down as I didn't have time to answer them all tonight.

The reason so much outsourcing ends up in India is because they are happy to work under western managers.

Of course with all races, you get the full spectrum from idiot to genius, western, Asian or otherwise, however only certain cultures have a compunction against learning or thinking outside the box. With Indians, you get two types of body shops, cheap ones that employ anyone with an IT cert so they get all the ones that paid for their certs and are pretty much useless. The second kind employs the Indians that are moderately competent, these guys actually earned their grades and are good at performing routine tasks but don't expect much in the way of creativity, the downside of this is that you pay more, probably about the same as hiring flunkies in the US. Those Indians that are actually as good as good western IT workers... We'll they're your colleges. Indians who are a good enough can generally get out of India of their own accord. Most end up in the UK or Australia as India is part of the Commonwealth of Nations which makes it easier to get a visa. Really good Indians will have worked all around the world.

Comment Re:Steam? (Score 1) 137

No, steam is not a subscription service. You buy each title you want, once, and that's it. If you want the dlc, you pay a separate unlock fee, once, to get it.

This is a monthly payment, and you get access to all the titles and all the dlc for them (however many your hard drive can hold), and you can swap them out and play them as much as you want....until you cancel the subscription; when you lose access to all of them.

It's going to be more like a Pay/Cable TV subscription. With the basic package, you only get access to a limited set of semi-popular games. To get access to the full catalogue, you need to pay for the gold package. Want DLC, you can pay a nominal sum for a DLC package per game.

Comment Re: It's pretty simple (Score 1) 272

So believing what Hamilton, Jefferson and Madison put in writing during the ratification debates about what the phrase meant is arguing the writers on the Constitution were unable to properly express themselves??? You obviously didn't bother to read the quotes from them in the link.

I'm not twisting anything. The real puzzle is why some people have created this myth that it somehow includes everything. Standard legal construction (for hundreds of years) is to read phrases as adding meaning to the text, not being superfluous. If it can cover any kind of spending, then there would have been no point in adding it to the Constitution. Only if it expresses a limitation on what kind of spending is allowed does it convey a meaning.

Comment Re:Poster does not understand Algebra (Score 1) 358

For a consumption tax, you don't have to track people's purchases. Instead, you track people's sales and the tax is collected by the seller.

In terms of privacy, this is much better, as you pretty much already know that Widget Corp. is a seller of Widgets and the government doesn't need to collect exactly _who_ they sold widgets to, just how much they sold them all for.

In terms of tracking, 90% of the States currently already track sales. It's how they collect State-level sales taxes. Piggybacking on an existing system is much cheaper/easier than running a completely different system, which is why most States currently piggy-back on the federal system for their income taxes.

In terms of black markets, even income made on the black market (currently untaxed due to the income tax system) gets taxed when used to consume things.

As for cheating, it's relatively simple to catch businesses cheating and they already have the structure and the . For the most part, individuals can't cheat because they're the buyers, not the sellers. You may get some used-market under the table cheating, but you can either call that a recycling incentive, or else create monetary incentives to catch it, i.e. a reward (no penalties) to any buyer who turns in a seller who sold them something without charging the tax.

Comment Re:Poster does not understand Algebra (Score 1) 358

It's funny how you respond to a post almost entirely about interest representing the compensation for the choice to defer consumption with no mention whatsoever of that point.

Just repeating your mistaken economic views over and over again while deriding the views of actual economists isn't very convincing. Try addressing the actual argument next time.

Comment Re:So give us your tax money (Score 1) 155

You want to waste money on all that?

What, do they write treaties on gold-pressed latinum now?

Compare costs of a typical treaty negotiation meeting to a just a single strike of ~50 Tomahawk cruise missiles at ~$325M each.

Diplomacy is ^always^ the cheaper option.

Now compare that same ballpark figure of the costs of negotiating a new treaty to the cost of effectively being cut out of the economic, technical, and scientific benefits of space exploration/exploitation.

Diplomacy is far and away the better option.

Strat

Comment Re:So give us your tax money (Score 1) 155

The treaty is required especially on the basis of preventing nuclear weapons use in space.

No.

*A* treaty is required, *this* one can be replaced/renegotiated. Isn't that what civilized nations do when circumstances change, renegotiate or replace a dated treaty with a new, more comprehensive one that accounts for current realities?

Strat

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