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Comment Re:Frequencies, brands, telcos (Score 1) 234

no. Just no. http://www.cancer.gov/research... There just isn't a rise in cancer since cell phones began. Yes, I guess those ones on the moon landing modules powered by plutonium reactors are cancer causing, but for those cell phones that are in use enough to matter, there isn't a corresponding rise in cancer. Literally the data are better to suggest cell phones LOWER cancer.

Comment Brain cancer rates are not rising. (Score 1) 234

Cell phone radiation unquestionably was not a factor before 1975, and unquestionably it is rising. My father was at a medical resident's conference in 1950 when they were amazed at this new cancer in a place that wasn't expected to be able to have cancer...lung cancer (everyone was smoking during the conference) and nobody had an idea why there could be all this cancer. I had a residents conference in 1980 when we were finding melanoma in children for the first time. Nobody had much doubt it was because of more sun exposure and more severe sun exposure. There isn't a rise in brain cancer like there were in lung and skin. http://seer.cancer.gov/statfac... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pm... http://www.cancer.gov/research...

Submission + - Fringe was right! Bald headed men from the future are taking over through Trump! (slate.com)

nerdpocalypse writes: Donald Trump has been seen with mysterious bald headed men. These are obviously the same bald men from the future intent on taking over our world that were seen on Fringe. Indeed, Donald Trump himself MIGHT BE ONE OF THEM!
(is this really more likely than:
Donald Trump's hair really is like that?
Barach Obama forging his birth certificate?
Thousands of Palestinians cheering 9/11?
Ted Cruz's dad being involved in the JFK cover-up?
A reality TV star, former Democrat, without any political experience becoming the Republican nominee for President?

Comment But the aliens DECEIVING us ARE a simulation. (Score 1) 830

Yeah, obviously, the amount of work involved in making a simulation able to have visible quantum effects is about the same as making a whole new universe. BUT, the aliens/robots/evil spirits that have us in a simulation are, indeed, a cgi simulation and we've all seen the movies they are in. The other point is that if you were to believe in the universe-as-simulation crap, you'd have to also allow the possibility of an infinite regress of the aliens deceiving us also being in a simulation, the robots deceiving teh aliens deceiving us also being deceived by Decartes Evil Daemon and the Evil Daemon deceiving the robots deceiving the aliens deceiving us are in turn deceived by the turtles. The turtles told me this, and that after them, it's turtles all the way down.

Comment It isn't THAT unique of an addiction. (Score 1) 282

The medial-basal brain functions to respond rapidly. The Striatum connects reward and emotion centers to immediate action centers and as such produces 'salience'. Activation of this area has emotional content. Duh. Drugs of abuse activate it. Duh. You know what else activates it? Responding to stress activates it. So, procrastination and then working really hard at the last possible time frame. Having lots of drama in a disrupted life. These all activate the same centers of the brain as drugs of abuse. but if you get work done, it is doubly reinforced.

Comment Re:correlation != causation != relevance (Score 1) 819

I'm not sure of ANY public health measures where the context matters. Do we care about drunk driving when we require seat belts? We do care about it when we make passive restraints, but again, the context doesn't matter except to say better protective devices work on ALL contexts. And these particular laws are likely to be effective especially BECAUSE they are the most context INDEPENDENT.

Comment These laws are in the right direction (Score 1) 819

The curve of the relationship between gun availability and homicide rates among different US states gives an S shaped, NOT a linear curve. This is similar to a bimolecular curve. Both the guns and the people using them are needed for violence, but while this curve implies a LOT of guns have to be removed to get a 50% reduction of violence, it also implies removing the people involved Or Their Access To Guns would work much better. The laws make sense in this context.

Comment They are so cute when they're stupid (UK not slash (Score 1) 418

This is so veddy veddy British. They think they actually can decide for the world about encryption. I'm a not-very-good script kiddie and I sorta-kinda knew how to do (some) of the many methods outlined here. Anyone who wants can just encrypt whatever they want and mostly it's not at all breakable and the amount of effort if even 1% of internet traffic is encrypted by different ways becomes prohibitively tedious to do anything about.

Submission + - Supreme Court may decide the fate of API's, Klingonese, Dothraki... (slate.com)

nerdpocalypse writes: In a larger battle than even Godzilla V Mothra, Google V Oracle threatens not only Japan but the entire Nerd World. What is at stake is how a language can be patented. This affects not just programming languages, API's, and everything that runs..well...everything, but also the copyright status of new languages such as Klingon and Dothraki

Comment But... it would likely actually work (temporarily) (Score 1) 260

Fat people eat on the basis of cues not internal hunger. You lose the normal cues to overeat when you eat a new diet and if it satisfies some psychological effect, you feel full while not eating so many calories (if you are fat and your normal cues are really messed up). http://www.csun.edu/~vcpsy00h/... and.... is there anything (ok, sex, dope, being proved right) that is more satisfying than chocolate? https://www.psychologytoday.co... so, it would work very temporarily.
Privacy

Submission + - Asking the readers; how would you write to your mistress (mashable.com)

nerdpocalypse writes: "There isn't much of a scoop on the news--everybody both knows the story and the situation is hardly unique in the Petraus... 'affair'. I'm just wondering how our readership would send tells to their mistress in ways that the FBI would have a tougher time finding out about.

Oh, and has anyone noticed that Big Brother now can monitor everyone's e-mail ?"

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What is the Best Way to Conduct Online Tutoring Sessions?

An anonymous reader writes: I am working with a tutoring center franchise which is trying to create an online real-time tutoring experience between a student and a tutor. The main features that we need include video chat, screen-sharing, and the ability to share pdf's between the student and tutor and then mark them up via a mouse or other input. I have not been able to find any turn-key solutions, and the cost and time required to build a completely custom solution is not an option, but I have seen some software such as Skype which offer bits and pieces (in Skype's case, video chat and screen-sharing). So, my question is has anyone on Slashdot worked on anything like this before? What did you find to offer up some of these abilities? How would you suggest integrating these components together?
Cloud

Submission + - Yes, the FBI and CIA can read your email. Here's how (zdnet.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: "Petraeus-gate," some U.S. pundits are calling it. How significant is it that even the head of the CIA can have his emails read by an albeit friendly domestic intelligence agency, which can lead to his resignation and global, and very public humiliation? And, it's not just limited to U.S. citizens. Through the Patriot Act, they can access EU/U.K. and Australian citizens' data, too. Here's how they do it.
Transportation

Submission + - Airlines Face Acute Pilot Shortage 2

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The WSJ reports that US airlines are facing their most serious pilot shortage since the 1960s, with federal mandates taking effect that will require all newly hired pilots to have at least 1,500 hours of prior flight experience—six times the current minimum—raising the cost and time to train new fliers in an era when pay cuts and more-demanding schedules already have made the profession less attractive. Meanwhile, thousands of senior pilots at major airlines soon will start hitting the mandatory retirement age of 65. "We are about four years from a solution, but we are only about six months away from a problem.,” says Bob Reding, recently retired executive vice president of operations at AMR Corp. A study by the University of North Dakota's aviation department indicates major airlines will need to hire 60,000 pilots by 2025 to replace departures and cover expansion over the next eight years. Meanwhile only 36,000 pilots have passed the Air Transport Pilot exam in the past eight years, which all pilots would have to pass under the congressionally imposed rules and there are limits to the ability of airlines, especially the regional carriers, to attract more pilots by raising wages. While the industry's health has improved in recent years, many carriers still operate on thin profit margins, with the airlines sandwiched between rising costs for fuel and unsteady demand from price-sensitive consumers. "It certainly will result in challenges to maintain quality," says John Marshall, an independent aviation-safety consultant who spent 26 years in the Air Force before overseeing Delta's safety. "Regional carriers will be creative and have to take shortcuts" to fill their cockpits."

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