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Comment Seriously? (Score 1) 138

So the "founding executive editor" of a publication famous for bum-kissing reviews of consumer electronics and not much else wants to contradict three people whose intellects, while vastly different from each other, compare to his as a tornado compares to a baby fart.

Kevin, please STFU and go back to your strength...rewriting articles explaining why we should line up for a week to be among the first million people to own the newest iPhone.

Leave the thinking for people who understand the topic.

Comment Libtard thermometers (Score 0) 141

Thermometers are just tools of libtard propaganda. I mean, how can I possibly have a so-called "fever" if my feet are cold? Where are the peer-reviewed scientific papers that show thermometers aren't a hoax? And I don't mean in libtard fake "scientific" journals like Nature, but in legitimate journals like this one:

http://www.coresci.org/jcts/

Trump needs to outlaw thermometers, is what.

Comment Re:BeauHD, can we get some programming subs? (Score 1) 83

I'm not going to create yet another online account just to submit content here to you for free!

Wait a minute. You're complaint is that you don't want to submit content for free but you want more articles about an open source programming language?

You might want to think that through.

Comment Re:Bleep this (Score 2) 34

(Fucking salt lamps, really? I knew people were stupid, but come on)

One of my neighbors got a salt lamp for Christmas and put it on the curb for garbage pickup by New Year's Eve. I saw it when I was walking the dog and snatched it up. I was hoping to wrap it again and re-gift it to someone as a gag, but my wife saw it and plugged it in. Now it sits as a night light on the counter in the hallway going to the bathroom. True story.

I don't know about any health benefits, but it is strangely attractive. A light bulb inside a lump of salt. Who would've thunk it?

Comment Re:OMG (Score 1) 386

It's an entitlement excuse.

When I was in high school, I knew a lot of kids who worked at Burger King. They were stealing money from their registers, some of them managing to lift over $800/month. Everyone agreed this was a good thing because "they didn't get paid enough." High school kids. Not paid enough. Seriously.

The only excuse for using company time for non-work is not having work to do. You get an admin job and you're efficient enough to do it in 1/3 the given time? Well, I can't rightly say you've been stealing company hours if you're achieving 100% of your assigned work. Some offices even tell you to go home if you're done your work, and pay you anyway--they're legally-obligated to pay your salary if you're exempt, just like they're not obligated to pay overtime, so if you work 15 hours and get all your shit done and they send you home you still get paid. That actually makes sense.

What doesn't make sense is agreeing on and accepting a salary and then stealing time, money, or equipment from your employer under the claim that they're not paying you a fair wage. There is no fair wage. Market rates are rates people can't manage to push up from and employers can't manage to push down from. Businesses employ the lowest bidder, and employees go with the highest bidder. You took the bid? You agreed to this shit. Excuses like the distress of unemployment and the difficulty of getting a job just tell me you wanted to fasttrack the process and get bumped to the front of the line and you bought the front spot--that's what your lower-than-industry-average salary is: a privileged purchasing agreement.

Comment Re:That's actually debateable (Score 1) 303

Manual-labor jobs they can. Office jobs require some downtime to refactor, and the 8-hour work day theoretically lets you mix that in so you can optimize it.

The more-scientific approach I've seen is to schedule high-effort, complex work in the mid-morning and around 2-5pm, with low-effort work put between 1pm and 3pm. The slump cripples your ability to perform productively, and so spending that time returning calls, checking e-mail, writing changelogs, and so forth lets your brain relax and recover so you can get back to designing rocket engines and writing complex computer code later in the afternoon. You wind up productive all day, doing the simple shit when you can't handle the heavy lifting.

The moral of the story? Do your code reviews and merge windows between 1pm and 3pm. It's less work than writing new code, and it keeps your head in the code so you're ready to hit the ground running right after.

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