Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! ×

Comment It was always sick (Score 3, Insightful) 200

What happened to Flash:

1. Animating junk on web pages was never very useful, so people more-or-less stopped doing it. Flash saved itself by becoming a way to deliver web video.
2. Decoding video with a general purpose CPU is very much inferior to decoding it with dedicated logic. Video standards were designed to enable dedicated logic decoders. CPU-based decoding used far, far too much energy so Flash couldn't compete or even come close.

Flash became mostly useless. Then it became only a way to get your system hacked and added to a botnet. Then it became nothing.

Comment And then there was Kinect (Score 5, Insightful) 114

If that was their only problem, they could have recovered more easily. But they also had:
- $100 higher price to cover the cost of Kinect -- a device few wanted
- the TV stuff and the Snap interface so you could split-screen TV and gaming -- providing a poor TV-watching experience and a poor gaming experience simultaneously
- a giant box that looked like a VCR with a big external power brick
- somewhat worse performance than the PS4 because of the speed of the RAM interface

It's difficult to dig yourself out of a hole that deep.

Comment Re:Yeah, nah. (Score 1) 365

Here it works where I am. I pump, I end pumping, I go inside and I pay.

Pay-after-you-pump disappeared from the US sometime in the '80s: it was still here when we left in 1984, but was pretty much gone by the time we returned in 1988. Paying cash before you pump an unknown quantity of gas is a pain in the ass as a result. Even if you just want $20 worth of gas and know it's not going to be a fill-up, you're still wasting time going inside unless you happen to need something more than just gas (and if I need to go inside for something, I do that after filling up and moving to a parking space to free up the pump for someone else).

Comment Re:Typical of America. It always belittles... (Score 1) 165

Needless to say, he returned to our company as a consultant on some project that had incurred budgetary overruns and incompetency.

All at the hands of our so-called American trained "engineers."

I can't speak to the specifics of this situation but I have seen others where the desires of in-house personnel were ignored but when the same initiatives are suggested by a consultant, they're followed with gusto.

Don't blame the engineers, blame the management.

LK

Comment Re:Yeah, nah. (Score 4, Insightful) 365

I pay cash at the filling station, at the grocery store, at restaurants, and more. Why? Because it tends to be faster. While others are waiting for their card to clear through the computer I've got my change and I'm gone.

On what planet do you live? How is going inside, waiting in line, paying for gas, pumping it, and going back inside and waiting again for your change faster than just swiping your card at the pump (or holding your phone up to the NFC reader), pumping your gas, and hanging the nozzle back up when you're done? For the others, you're trusting that the people involved can do basic arithmetic quickly enough and accurately enough to get your change right in a timely manner. On the occasions that I do pay cash, if I hand over $4.10 instead of $4.00 for a $3.85 purchase, maybe half the time I get a blank stare in return. Hand them plastic and you don't burden their feeble minds with having to make sense of that.

There are plenty of good reasons to hang onto cash, but transaction speed isn't one of them.

Comment Ya, and that will hold up... not (Score 4, Informative) 346

Here's the deal: All proprietary software has that in there as well. Every piece of software has an EULA that says they are responsible for nothing. Have a look at the MS EULA if you wish, there's all kinds of shit that supposedly limits liability, requires arbitration, etc, etc https://www.microsoft.com/en-u....

You can say it all you like, doesn't make it true. I can write an EULA saying "By using this software you agree I get to take your first born child," and yet if I tried, I'd still go to jail because just saying it in an EULA doesn't make it so. You can't disclaim all warranties, all damages, etc by law. For some info on it look up the Uniform Commercial Code.

Ok well all that aside when it comes to an issue like this courts are not known for applying the law one way in one case, and a different way in another. They don't say "Oh we like this nice OSS" and give it one rule and "We don't like this mean commercial software" and give it another. Thus if courts find that software makers are liable for incidental data loss then it will apply to ALL software. OSS has no special get out clause. You don't get to have it both ways where OSS gets a magic liability shield just by putting something in a text document but commercial EULAs aren't worth the bits used to store them.

In fact, OSS will be MORE vulnerable. Commercial companies have lawyers to help them wrangle out of things. They also can always go the real contract route, where you sign an actual contract up front with them before buying (you see this with some enterprise software) which can enforce more stringent terms. OSS that is just distributed on the web doesn't have all that.

Comment You don't want this to succed (Score 4, Insightful) 346

Even if you are a rampant MS hater, this would set a really bad precedent: That software companies could be liable for data loss caused by things only incidentally related to their software. Talk about a ripe field for bullshit lawsuits.

Don't think OSS would be immune either. The argument of "but I didn't charge for it" doesn't eliminate liability. In fact, it would be something companies could use to try and bully OSS out of existence through bullshit lawsuits.

Comment Re: Why the media blitz over this? (Score 1) 293

Simple solution: The snowflakes should become unemployed.

In considerable measure, they already are not just unemployed, but unemployable. Think about it: for what work is your average women's studies graduate qualified, beyond asking if you'd like fries with that? Even that's asking too much of them, given the likelihood they'd spit in your burger if they accused you of directing your "male gaze" at them for so much as a microsecond.

Slashdot Top Deals

A computer without COBOL and Fortran is like a piece of chocolate cake without ketchup and mustard.

Working...