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Submission + - Wikipedia blocked in Turkey (turkeyblocks.org)

Ilgaz writes: The Turkey Blocks monitoring network has verified restrictions affecting the Wikipedia online encyclopaedia in Turkey. A block affecting all language editions of the website detected at 8:00AM local time Saturday 29 April. The loss of availability is consistent with internet filters used to censor content in the country.

Submission + - A Russian-controlled telecom hijacked 24 Financial Services' Internet Traffic (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: On Wednesday, large chunks of network traffic belonging to MasterCard, Visa, and more than two dozen other financial services companies were briefly routed through a Russian government-controlled telecom under unexplained circumstances that renew lingering questions about the trust and reliability of some of the most sensitive Internet communications.

Anomalies in the border gateway protocol—which routes large-scale amounts of traffic among Internet backbones, ISPs, and other large networks—are common and usually the result of human error. While it's possible Wednesday's five- to seven-minute hijack of 36 large network blocks may also have been inadvertent, the high concentration of technology and financial services companies affected made the incident "curious" to engineers at network monitoring service BGPmon. What's more, the way some of the affected networks were redirected indicated their underlying prefixes had been manually inserted into BGP tables, most likely by someone at Rostelecom, the Russian government-controlled telecom that improperly announced ownership of the blocks.

Submission + - Trump Order Helps Offshore Drilling, Stops Marine Sanctuary Expansion (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In an executive order signed on Friday, President Trump directed his secretary of the interior to review current rules on offshore drilling and exploration. This review is likely to result in a relaxation of the strict protections the previous administration put on offshore oil drilling in the Atlantic and in the Arctic. According to the Washington Post, a review of the rules is likely to “make millions of acres of federal waters eligible for oil and gas leasing.” At the same time, Trump’s executive order directed the secretary of commerce to cease designating new marine sanctuaries or expanding any that already exist. According to USA Today, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is also “directed to review all designations and expansions of marine monuments or sanctuaries designated under the Antiquities Act within the last 10 years.” The Post says this “includes Hawaii’s Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, which Obama quadrupled in size last year, and the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts off Massachusetts.” Although these reviews could take some time to complete, they put in motion a bid to favor extraction industries like oil and gas mining. “Today, we’re unleashing American energy and clearing the way for thousands and thousands of high-paying energy jobs,” Trump reportedly told the Associated Press.

Submission + - Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from Pleistocene sediments (theatlantic.com)

ISayWeOnlyToBePolite writes: The Atlantic reports https://www.theatlantic.com/sc... that Viviane Slon from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and her colleagues have now managed to extract and sequence the DNA of ancient animals from sediment thatâ(TM)s up to 240,000 years old. By creating a molecule that binds to mammal DNA they have been able to sort out Denisovan, Neanderhal, mammoths, woolly rhinos, and cave bears from cave sediments at a previously unprecidented scale. Paywalled science article http://science.sciencemag.org/...

Submission + - NASA officially delays SLS first flight to 2019 (arstechnica.com)

schwit1 writes: Despite spending almost $19 billion and more than thirteen years of development, NASA today admitted that it will have to delay the first test flight of the SLS rocket from late 2018 to sometime in 2019.

“We agree with the GAO that maintaining a November 2018 launch readiness date is not in the best interest of the program, and we are in the process of establishing a new target in 2019,” wrote William Gerstenmaier, chief of NASA’s human spaceflight program. “Caution should be used in referencing the report on the specific technical issues, but the overall conclusions are valid.”

The competition between the big government SLS/Orion program and private commercial space is downright embarrassing to the government. While SLS continues to be delayed, even after more than a decade of work and billions of wasted dollars, SpaceX is gearing up for the first flight of Falcon Heavy this year. And they will be doing it despite the fact that Congress took money from the commercial private space effort, delaying its progress, in order to throw more money at SLS/Orion.

Submission + - DNA-Based Test Can Spot Cancer Recurrence a Year Before Conventional Scans (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A revolutionary blood test has been shown to diagnose the recurrence of cancer up to a year in advance of conventional scans in a major lung cancer trial. The test, known as a liquid biopsy, could buy crucial time for doctors by indicating that cancer is growing in the body when tumors are not yet detectable on CT scans and long before the patient becomes aware of physical symptoms. It works by detecting free-floating mutated DNA, released into the bloodstream by dying cancer cells. In the trial of 100 lung cancer patients, scientists saw precipitous rises in tumor DNA in the blood of patients who would go on to relapse months, or even a year, later. In the latest trial, reported in the journal Nature, 100 patients with non-small cell lung cancer were followed from diagnosis through surgery and chemotherapy, having blood tests every six to eight weeks. By analyzing the patchwork of genetic faults in cells across each tumor, scientists created personalized genomic templates for each patient. This was then compared to the DNA floating in their blood, to assess whether a fraction of it matched that seen in their tumor.

Comment Britain is the surveillance capital of the West (Score 3, Insightful) 89

Theresa May passed what Snowden called "the most extreme surveillance in the history of western democracy. It goes further than many autocracies."

Before this, airports were making 3D models of flyers' faces without their knowledge or permission, and attaching such to their passport records. This happens if you go through the 'inbound' e-passport aisle. I saw this with my own eyes at Bristol Airport before a security guard shouted at me. There is no law against such data collection.

I don't know if you can get a ticket with cash but otherwise you can bet these facial/3D scans will be added to a GCHQ database.

Submission + - New Study Suggests Humans Lived In North America 130,000 Years Ago (npr.org)

An anonymous reader writes: In 1992, archaeologists working a highway construction site in San Diego County found the partial skeleton of a mastodon, an elephant-like animal now extinct. Mastodon skeletons aren't so unusual, but there was other strange stuff with it. "The remains were in association with a number of sharply broken rocks and broken bones," says Tom Demere, a paleontologist at the San Diego Natural History Museum. He says the rocks showed clear marks of having been used as hammers and an anvil. And some of the mastodon bones as well as a tooth showed fractures characteristic of being whacked, apparently with those stones. It looked like the work of humans. Yet there were no cut marks on the bones showing that the animal was butchered for meat. Demere thinks these people were after something else. "The suggestion is that this site is strictly for breaking bone," Demere says, "to produce blank material, raw material to make bone tools or to extract marrow." Marrow is a rich source of fatty calories. The scientists knew they'd uncovered something rare. But they didn't realize just how rare for years, until they got a reliable date on how old the bones were by using a uranium-thorium dating technology that didn't exist in the 1990s. The bones were 130,000 years old. That's a jaw-dropping date, as other evidence shows that the earliest humans got to the Americas about 15,000 to 20,000 years ago.

Comment Re:Save 30%, retire early (Score 1) 544

No, the math's not hard, but achieving it is getting tougher all the time. Save 30%? Starting when exactly, given that the generation in question is almost certainly going to be stuck with either low paying jobs or having to pay off student loan debts before they can even think about sorting out a place of their own? Maybe one of the fortunate few that gets a big break with a successful startup or has the connections/skills/talent to reach the upper levels of their chosen career can still pull it off, but the rest are basically screwed and will absolutely have to work longer to reach a point they can retire in comfort.

Also, don't forget that pensions also take into account things like expected lifespans published in arcturial tables. Even if the retirement age and inflation adjusted pension pot remained constant, if your post-retirement life expectancy is eleven years instead of ten, you've got (more or less) 10% less to live on each month - adjust accordingly if medical science advances that to twelve or more years. Factor in the ever decreasing social security budgets, the rising age at whch you can qualify for it, and how poorly many pension funds are currently performing, and the prospects of early retirement seem much slimmer than for the previous few generations.

Submission + - FCC Announces Plan To Reverse Title II Net Neutrality (theverge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Federal Communications Commission is cracking open the net neutrality debate again with a proposal to undo the 2015 rules that implemented net neutrality with Title II classification. FCC chairman Ajit Pai called the rules “heavy handed” and said their implementation was “all about politics.” He argued that they hurt investment and said that small internet providers don’t have “the means or the margins” to withstand the regulatory onslaught. “Earlier today I shared with my fellow commissioners a proposal to reverse the mistake of Title II and return to the light touch framework that served us so well during the Clinton administration, Bush administration, and first six years of the Obama administration,” Pai said today. His proposal will do three things: first, it’ll reclassify internet providers as Title I information services; second, it’ll prevent the FCC from adapting any net neutrality rules to practices that internet providers haven’t thought up yet; and third, it’ll open questions about what to do with several key net neutrality rules — like no blocking or throttling of apps and websites — that were implemented in 2015.

Submission + - Pirate Site Blockades Violate Free Speech, Mexico's Supreme Court Rules (torrentfreak.com)

happyfeet2000 writes: Broad pirate sites blockades are disproportional, Mexico's Supreme Court of Justice has ruled. The Government can't order ISPs to block websites that link to copyright-infringing material because that would also restrict access to legitimate content and violate the public's freedom of expression. The ruling is a win for local ISP Alestra, which successfully protested the Government's blocking efforts.

Comment Re: Yet another case for VPN tunnels (Score 1) 93

Any remote management protocol can be exploited if the implementation is bad - regardless of whether it's console style via SSH, web via HTTPS, or a dedicated device management protocol like SNMP or TR-069. Firmware bugs in authentication and exploits aside, it shouldn't matter what protocol you use provided that it is properly authenticated with a non-default password, uses an encrypted protocol, and (most critically of all) access is limited to a specific management network. The trick is to assume things will get broken, then put multiple layers of defence in place so that even when something inevitably does break the rest will keep things secure while you implement a fix - ignoring it is not an option either.

People have been chanting the "defence in depth" mantra for decades, some people have been *doing* it for decades and publishing HOWTO guides to help others do the same, and yet other people are also still getting burned by failing to do it. Ultimately, it's just the consequence of another three way choice where you only get to pick two options; the choices are "cheap", "easy" and "secure", and this is what happens when you don't include "secure" in your selection - cheap and easy both end up going down the toilet as well.

Comment Re:Crook? (Score 2) 93

My view too. Janit0r is absolutely a vigilante, but currently BrickerBot (and the less destructive Hajime) are only active "solutions" to the various IoT botnets such as Mirai and, from their posts, I believe (s)he would stand down as soon as more active steps were taken by the vendors, ISPs, and owners. Far from ideal but, until those in a position to do something about it in a less disruptive manner step up to the plate, if that's the only option for the rest of us caught in the firing line, then I'll live with it. Keep calm, and carry on bricking!

As for this specific incident, although Zyxel has to take some blame for shipping broken routers in the first place, I'd say the main culprit here is actually SierraTel, both for their failure to implement secure central management of their modems in the first place, but mostly for failing to learn from Deutsche Telekom's experience and remediating that error, despite having *six months* to do so. Clearly that has now cost them financially and in customer satisfacation, which should hopefully server as a wake up call to anyone else in a similar situation and dragging their feet over deploying a solution. Somehow, I don't think SierraTel is going to be the only ISP to have this kind of problem though.

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