Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:easily made up in peripherals. (Score 1) 416

Speaking as an admin, the number of mac users that request elegant peripherals is not trivial.

No doubt, but a business is allowed to say 'no' to those requests, if it feels it's not worth the money to buy the elegant peripherals.

I imagine a lot of businesses probably don't care though, since compared to their ongoing salary costs, the cost of an occasional frou-frou trackpad is rounding error. If a one-time $80 purchase makes a $3000/week employee happier and/or more productive, why not?

Comment Re:Were the users randomized? (Score 1) 416

Tried that. It didn't work because the technically inept parent still had just as much problem with the Apple product. It turns out that you can't idiot proof something.

Sometimes you gotta up the dose. If a Mac isn't simple enough, switch them to an iPad. If they can't handle the iPad, then there's no hope, you'll need to migrate them back to pen-and-paper.

Comment Re:Were the users randomized? (Score 1) 416

it's a hidden cost that is virtually impossible to tally on a spreadsheet: your productivity is lost while you fix that problem. Did it take you an hour, where a tech might have taken 10 minutes?

Not really an issue at my employer, where the IT department will always take at least 48 hours to respond, followed by an additional 8 hours to diagnose, only to conclude that my Mac "must have come down with a virus" and recommend that I reinstall Windows on it.

(only mostly kidding)

Comment Re: Ignores the issue (Score 1) 113

Why would the Clinton campaign risk doing anything now, when they're already cruising towards a landslide victory? Trump did a fantastic job of disqualifying himself at the debates; now all they have to do is run out he clock. To try some "October surprise" at this point would gain them very little, but if it went wrong somehow it could hurt them greatly.

Comment Re:In all honesty... (Score 1) 233

They should have let him continue. It's not like he was contributing anything except masses of data for the cool-aid drinkers to misrepresent. And discrediting himself in the process. Now those cool-aid drinkers will have something unfair to point to.

On a side note, I'll point out that he's been dumping on Hillary with impunity, but as soon as he got into what the banks consider their private business someone gave Ecuador a call.

Comment Under what circumstances would a user notice? (Score 2) 155

Are there situations where a user would notice a slower flash write speed on their cell phone?

The only time I can think of where a phone would need to write massive amounts to flash is during an OS upgrade (which is hopefully a rare thing) -- even during an app install, the user is likely to be bounded by their network's download speed, not by the speed of writing to flash. Similarly, while recording live video, the phone only needs to write at the bandwidth of the video stream, no faster.

Is there some use case I'm missing?

Comment Re:They lost me at Goldman Sachs (Score 1) 234

There's at least two reasons here why GS would be interested:
1. High frequency trading, if you control the software and make it as fast as possible, then all that is left is the networking between you and the exchange. Controlling the networking is the next step, this is total control, total integration
2. Limit backdoors; if you own the system totally and completely, you can nearly guarantee your system has no backdoors from state actors.
If you're as big as GS, you definitely don't want to own any american made networking hardware, and building it from the ground up is a cheap hedge against whatever lawsuits come down the line

Comment Re:small problem (Score 2) 227

The main problem is that the sun does not produce a whole lot of energy that can be captured on the night side of the earth, and we happen to consume a lot of energy when it's dark. If you overbuild capacity for daytime generation, nighttime generation is mostly solved, the big problem now is not cheap renewable energy, but rather, how to store it. Even if converting water and CO2 in to Ethanol is only 15% efficiency, you're still able to store 15% of your excess grid energy, whereas before you could only store 0% of excess grid energy. These guys are claiming 60% in the lab, which probably means 20-30% at industrial scale, perhaps 40% within our lifetime. It's not 85-90% hydro-electric efficient, but that's pretty dang good for a fuel which has so many uses, stores well for long periods of time and works with existing combustion engines.

Comment Re:Clinton, Podesta, Putin and Trump (Score 3, Funny) 435

Respected Avatar or NPC,

We notice that you are vigorously trying to overcorrect for your simulation's liberal bias. If you are unhappy in your simulation you can submit petition KB3035583 to request being moved to another simulation with a different bias.

The Operators

Comment Re:For them theoretically hacking a private org? (Score 1) 352

Do you have any sources? Election systems shouldn't be hackable. They should be networked but not on the internet. That's really poor planning.

I only saw the bit about 32 states on yesterday's CBS Evening News. They focused on Arizona, where IIRC the state voter registration database was breached (but supposedly not downloaded or tampered with).

They said there had been something like 190,000 attacks and probes, of which 11,000 considered serious. Unfortunately I didn't get the context for that (i.e., whether it was just election infrastructure, or what the time frame was).

You're right though - neither the election infrastructure nor any other part of our national infrastructure (public and private) should be exposed to attacks via the internet.

Comment Re:Who cares? (Score 1) 313

A good chunk of that is executive and engineering salaries, R&D costs etc etc
If they fired all but a skeleton crew and ran it out of AWS they could definitely do what was proposed.
The problem is that they've been in "perpetual growth mode" for 8 years or so, but haven't been able to show any growth for 2-3 years. They've been trapped at about 320 million users for well over one year, soon to be two years. Due to... Silicon Valley mentality + brand name appeal(?) they've continued to attract business dollars but I suspect when they do hard analysis of how many engaged human (not bots, not automated scripts) users they have, they realize it's a skeleton service like PR Wire or whatever, that marketers buy in to and the business/journalism community uses as a read-only service, but there's no "social networking" happening by anyone with any money (i.e. adults and college students).
My guess is that Sales Force, etc sign a NDA, do their due diligence and find out that they have less than 150 million engaged verifiably human users. That certainly devalues the stock. Eventually it'll come out, it's only a matter of time.

Slashdot Top Deals

Scientists will study your brain to learn more about your distant cousin, Man.