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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Would you design a modern CPU with virtual memory support?

kruhft writes: Virtual memory[1] is useful for a number of things[2], but can takes up a large amount of die space and development time during the development of a CPU to be both efficient and correct. With the advent of 64+ bit architectures and cheap memory available today, an extended address space and paging aren't specifically needed for many tasks. Memory safe, high level languages[3] need less 'isolation' and 'protection' from a VM subsystem than traditional languages like C and C++. Page tables help the OS organize non-contiguous physical memory for applications, but is that as much an issue today, especially for symbolic and object based languages?

If one was to design a new 'high level' language CPU today, would it be seen as advantageous to include a traditional multi-level page table based virtual memory system, or could the resources be put to better use in other areas of the chip design?

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

[2] The primary benefits of virtual memory include freeing applications from having to manage a shared memory space, increased security due to memory isolation, and being able to conceptually use more memory than might be physically available, using the technique of paging.

[3] http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm...

Submission + - AMD Ryzen 7 Series Processor Independent Reviews Live, Zen Looks Strong Vs Intel (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: AMD has finally lifted the veil on independent reviews of its new Ryzen series of desktop processors that bring the company's CPU architecture back more on competitive footing versus its rival, Intel's Core series. The initial family of Ryzen processors consists of three 8-core chips, the Ryzen 7 1800X at 3.6GHz with boost to 4.1GHz, the Ryzen 7 1700X at 3.4Ghz with boost to 3.8GHz and the Ryzen 7 1700 at 3GHz with boost to 3.7GHz. Each has support for 2 threads per core, for a total of 16 threads with 16MB of L3 cache on-board, 512K of L2 and TDPs that range from 65 watts for the Ryzen 7 1700 at the low-end, on up to 95 watts for the 1700X and 1800X. In comparison to AMD's long-standing A-series APUs and FX-series processors, the new architecture is significantly more efficient and performant than any of AMD's previous desktop processor offerings. AMD designed the Zen microarchitecture at the heart of Ryzen with performance, throughput, and efficiency in mind. Initially, AMD had reported a 40% target for IPC (instructions per clock) improvement with Zen but actually realized about a 52% lift in overall performance. In the general compute workloads, rendering, and clock-for-clock comparisons, the Ryzen 7 1800X either outperformed or gives Intel's much more expensive Core i7-6900K a run for its money. The lower clock speeds of the Ryzen 7 1700X and 1700 obviously resulted in performance a notch behind the flagship 1800X, but those processors also performed quite well. Ryzen was especially strong in heavily threaded workloads like 3D rendering and Ray Tracing, but even in less strenuous tests like PCMark, the Ryzen 7 series competed favorably. It's not all good news, though. With some older code, audio encoding, lower-res gaming, and platform level tests, Ryzen trailed Intel – sometimes by a wide margin. There's obviously still optimization work that needs to be done – from both AMD and software developers.

Submission + - Intel Core i7-7700K Kaby Lake review: Is the desktop CPU dead? (arstechnica.co.uk)

joshtops writes: ArsTechnica has reviewed the much-anticipated Intel Core i7-7700K Kaby Lake, the recently launched desktop processor from the giant chipmaker. And it's anything but a good sign for enthusiasts who were hoping to see significant improvements in performance. From the review, "The Intel Core i7-7700K is what happens when a chip company stops trying. The i7-7700K is the first desktop Intel chip in brave new post-"tick-tock" world—which means that instead of major improvements to architecture, process, and instructions per clock (IPC), we get slightly higher clock speeds and a way to decode DRM-laden 4K streaming video. Huzzah. [sic] If you're still rocking an older Ivy Bridge or Haswell processor and weren't convinced to upgrade to Skylake, there's little reason to upgrade to Kaby Lake. Even Sandy Bridge users may want to consider other upgrades first, such as a new SSD or graphics card. The first Sandy Bridge parts were released six years ago, in January 2011. [sic] As it stands, what we have with Kaby Lake desktop is effectively Sandy Bridge polished to within an inch of its life, a once-groundbreaking CPU architecture hacked, and tweaked, and mangled into ever smaller manufacturing processes and power envelopes. Where the next major leap in desktop computing power comes from is still up for debate—but if Kaby Lake is any indication, it won't be coming from Intel.

Submission + - Worst Mass Shooting in U.S. History (cnn.com) 17

An anonymous reader writes: From CNN:

"Fifty people were killed inside Pulse, a gay nightclub, Orlando Police Chief John Mina and other officials said Sunday morning, just hours after a shooter opened fire in the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. At least 53 more people were injured, Mina said. Police have shot and killed the gunman, he told reporters.

The shooter is not from the Orlando area, Mina said. He has been identified as Omar Saddiqui Mateen, 29, of Fort Pierce, about 120 miles southeast of Orlando, two law enforcement officials tell CNN.
Orlando authorities said they consider the violence an act of domestic terror. The FBI is involved. While investigators are exploring all angles, they "have suggestions the individual has leanings towards (Islamic terrorism), but right now we can't say definitely," said Ron Hopper, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI's Orlando bureau."

Submission + - Graphene Light Bulb Coming To Stores Soon (bbc.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A light bulb made from graphene — said by its UK developers to be the first commercially viable consumer product using the super-strong carbon — is to go on sale later this year. The dimmable LED bulb with a graphene-coated filament was designed at Manchester University, where the material was discovered in 2004. It is said to cut energy use by 10% and last longer owing to its conductivity. It is expected to be priced lower than current LED bulbs, which cost about £15 each.

Submission + - Fatwa forbids Muslims from traveling to Mars (cnet.com) 2

PolygamousRanchKid writes: The Khaleej Times of Dubai reports that a fatwa committee has forbidden Muslims from taking a one-way trip to the Red Planet. At the moment, there is no technology available that would allow for a return trip from Mars, so it is truly a one-way ticket for the colonists, who may also become reality TV stars in the process. The committee of the General Authority of Islamic Affairs and Endowment in the United Arab Emirates that issued the fatwa against such a journey doesn't have anything against space exploration,Elon Musk's Mars visions, or anything like that. Rather, the religious leaders argue that making the trip would be tantamount to committing suicide, which all religions tend to frown upon.

Professor Farooq Hamada, who presided over the committee, explained, "Protecting life against all possible dangers and keeping it safe is an issue agreed upon by all religions and is clearly stipulated in verse 4/29 of the Holy Quran: Do not kill yourselves or one another. Indeed, Allah is to you ever Merciful." Hundreds of Saudis and other Arabs have applied to Mars One, and the committee suspects some may be interested in the trip "for escaping punishment or standing before Almighty Allah for judgment," according to the Khaleej Times.

The committee stood firm in its belief that this approach would be a waste of time and one very long trip: "This is an absolutely baseless and unacceptable belief because not even an atom falls outside the purview of Allah, the Creator of everything."

Submission + - How Iron Maiden found its worst music pirates -- then went and played for them (citeworld.com)

mattydread23 writes: Iron Maiden, the heavy metal band, was suffering the same kinds of losses to piracy as other classic acts. So the band used data from Musicmetric to see where its biggest fans were — including the biggest pirates of its music. Turns out, some of the biggest fans live in South America, so Maiden booked a bunch of tours there, and made millions. The results helped Iron Maiden LLC become one of six music firms in the UK to outperform the music sector as a whole. Plus, made a lot of heshers happy.

Submission + - Hostess Brands closing for good, end of the Twinkie (cnn.com)

who_stole_my_kidneys writes: Hostess Brands — the maker of such iconic baked goods as Twinkies, Devil Dogs and Wonder Bread — announced Friday that it is asking a federal bankruptcy court for permission to close its operations, blaming a strike by bakers protesting a new contract imposed on them. "We deeply regret the necessity of today's decision, but we do not have the financial resources to weather an extended nationwide strike," said CEO Gregory Rayburn in a statement.

now what are people supposed to eat on a 8 hour raid / frag session?

Apple

Submission + - Apple join the growing number of Nokia licensees (bbc.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Apple & Nokia ended their 2 year old law suit about mobile technology patents. It seems that Nokia had the strongest arguments as Apple paid an undisclosed amount of money (according to the Dutch NOS news enough to add approx 30% to Nokia's profit for 2011) and both agreed upon using each other's contested patents...
Science

Submission + - Airbus' Vision for 2050. Where's the Cockpit? (wsj.com)

pbahra writes: "Airbus have shed light on what the aircraft of the future will look like and how that could change passengers’ experiences when they fly in 2050 with a flashy computer generated video. Of course, it’s a plane they hope one day to build. So, what does the future hold in the eyes of one of the world’s biggest aircraft manufacturers and would any airline actually buy into an idea where space is provided on an aircraft to play virtual golf? From the video it appears that the cabin crew which greet you and guide you towards the correct aisle have disappeared. Instead, they are replaced by hand-print scanners that check you in and then show images of where your seats are. Airbus believes the futuristic web-like roof, providing panoramic views, will be strong enough to withhold the pressures associated with flight. But have Aibus forgotten one really important feature? None of the video images seem to show where the cockpit may be situated. Perhaps there’s no need for them in Airbus’ eyes, but we think it might be quite important."

Submission + - UK's 4G Spectrum Sale Designed To Preserve Players (eweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "the UK regulator Ofcom has announced plans to auction spectrum for 4G mobile broadband. By imposing maximum and minimum limits to what any operator can buy, the regulator hopes the UK can keep four mobile operators — just as the US looks like losing one. The UK operator 3 had warned an open auction might put it out of business, but has welcomed Ofcom's published plans ."
Power

Submission + - University switches to DC workstations (bath.ac.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers at the University of Bath, UK are undertaking an in-depth study of energy consumption within the new network, with the aim of demonstrating that running a large network of devices on DC rather than AC is both more secure and more energy efficient. AC electric power from the grid is converted to DC and runs 50 specially adapted computers in the University Library. Students using the system have noticed that the new computers are more compact and much quieter than the previous systems. The immediate advantages of the new system are not only for the user but for the energy bill payer and the environment.
The Internet

Submission + - Why I'm Posting Bail Money for Julian Assange (huffingtonpost.com) 3

digitaldc writes: Yesterday, in the Westminster Magistrates Court in London, the lawyers for WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange presented to the judge a document from me stating that I have put up $20,000 of my own money to help bail Mr. Assange out of jail.

Furthermore, I (Michael Moore) am publicly offering the assistance of my website, my servers, my domain names and anything else I can do to keep WikiLeaks alive and thriving as it continues its work to expose the crimes that were concocted in secret and carried out in our name and with our tax dollars.

Google

Submission + - Google OS Announced 12

shystershep writes: "Rumors have been floating around for years that Google was planning an OS to compete with Window. As of Tuesday night, it is official: "So today, we're announcing a new project that's a natural extension of Google Chrome — the Google Chrome Operating System. It's our attempt to re-think what operating systems should be. Google Chrome OS is an open source, lightweight operating system that will initially be targeted at netbooks. Later this year we will open-source its code, and netbooks running Google Chrome OS will be available for consumers in the second half of 2010." It is separate from the Android mobile OS, will run on both x86 and ARM processors, and is aimed primarily at web use. Other than that, details are scarce."

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